Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Assarsson, R., Petersen, S., Högberg, B., Strandh, M. & Johansson, K. (2019). Gender inequality and adolescent suicide ideation across Africa, Asia, the South Pacific and Latin America: A cross-sectional study based on the Global School Health Survey (GSHS). Global Health Action, 11(sup3), 1-10, Article ID 1663619.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender inequality and adolescent suicide ideation across Africa, Asia, the South Pacific and Latin America: A cross-sectional study based on the Global School Health Survey (GSHS)
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, no sup3, p. 1-10, article id 1663619Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Suicide ideation is a health issue affecting adolescents worldwide. There are significant variations in suicide ideation between countries and genders, which have not been fully explained. Research is especially lacking in countries outside Europe and North America. Gender equality has been shown to matter in other aspects of adolescent mental health, such as life satisfaction, but has not been researched in relation to suicide ideation at national level.

Objective: To investigate how national gender inequality is related to self-reported suicide ideation among adolescents, and whether this association differs between boys and girls.

Methods: This is a cross-national, cross-sectional study using individual survey data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey, a survey in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the South Pacific, developed and supported by among others the WHO and the CDC; connecting this to national data: the gender inequality index from the UNDP; controlling for GDP per capita and secondary school enrolment. The data was analysed using a multilevel logistic regression method and included 149,306 students from 37 countries.

Results: Higher national gender inequality, as measured by the gender inequality index, was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of suicide ideation in both girls and boys (odds ratio: 1.38 p-value: 0.015), but for girls and both sexes this was only after adjusting for selection bias due to secondary school enrolment (as well as GDP/capita). Interaction models showed that this association was stronger in boys than in girls.

Conclusions: National gender inequality seems to be associated with higher levels of suicide ideation among adolescents in mainly low- and middle-income countries, especially among boys.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Gender equality, adolescents, suicide ideation, global health, mental health, child, inequality, low income populations, gender, suicide
National Category
General Practice Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Family Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75382 (URN)10.1080/16549716.2019.1663619 (DOI)2-s2.0-85072558412 (Scopus ID)
Note

SPECIAL ISSUE: Gender and Health Inequality

Available from: 2019-10-15 Created: 2019-10-15 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Bortes, C., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2019). Is the effect of ill health on school achievement among Swedish adolescents gendered?. SSM - Population Health, 8, 1-8, Article ID 100408.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the effect of ill health on school achievement among Swedish adolescents gendered?
2019 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 8, p. 1-8, article id 100408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates why the relationship between health problems requiring hospitalization between the ages of 13 and 16 and school achievement (school grades in 9th grade) in Sweden was stronger for girls than for boys. We reviewed previous research on gender differences in subjective health, health care utilization and medical drug treatment to identify mechanisms responsible for this gendered effect. The relationship was analysed using retrospective observational data from several national full-population registers of individuals born in 1990 in Sweden (n = 115 196), and ordinary least squares techniques were used to test hypotheses. We found that girls had longer stays when hospitalized, which mediated 15% of the interaction effect. Variability in drug treatment between boys and girls did not explain the gendered effect of hospitalization. The main mediator of the gendered effect was instead differences in diagnoses between boys and girls. Girls’ hospitalizations were more commonly related to mental and behavioural diagnoses, which have particularly detrimental effects on school achievement. © 2019 The Authors

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Sweden, Child health, Adolescent health, Disease, Mental disorders, Academic achievement, Registries, Gender differences
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73554 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100408 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067510629 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-10 Created: 2019-07-10 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Hogberg, B., Strandh, M., Baranowska-Rataj, A. & Johansson Seva, I. (2018). Ageing, health inequalities and the welfare state: A multilevel analysis. Journal of European Social Policy, 28(4), 311-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ageing, health inequalities and the welfare state: A multilevel analysis
2018 (English)In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Comparative studies of health inequalities have largely neglected age and ageing aspects, while ageing research has often paid little attention to questions of social inequalities. This article investigates cross-country differences in gradients in self-rated health and limiting long-standing illness (LLSI) in middle-aged and in older people (aged 50-64 and 65-80years) linked to social class, and degrees to which the social health gradients are associated with minimum pension levels and expenditure on elderly care. For these purposes, data from the European Social Survey (2002-2010) are analysed using multilevel regression techniques. We find significant cross-level interaction effects between class and welfare policies: higher expenditure on elderly care and particularly more generous minimum pensions are associated with smaller health inequalities in the older age group (65-80years). It is concluded that welfare policies moderate the association between social class and health, highlighting the importance of welfare state efforts for older persons, who are strongly reliant on the welfare state and welfare state arrangements such as pensions and care policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Health equity, LLSI, social class, social gradient, subjective health
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69575 (URN)10.1177/0958928717739234 (DOI)000445639900001 ()
Available from: 2018-10-11 Created: 2018-10-11 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Namatovu, F., Strandh, M., Ivarsson, A. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 103(2), 143-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study
2018 (English)In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Coeliac disease might affect school performance due to its effect on cognitive performance and related health consequences that might increase school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with coeliac disease performed differently on completion of ninth grade in school compared with children without coeliac disease.

Methods: Analysis was performed on a population of 445 669 children born in Sweden between 1991 and 1994 of whom 1767 were diagnosed with coeliac disease. School performance at ninth grade was the outcome and coeliac disease was the exposure. Other covariates included sex, Apgar score at 5 min, small for gestational age, year of birth, family type, parental education and income.

Results: There was no association between coeliac disease and school performance at ninth grade (adjusted coefficient -2.4, 95% CI 5.1 to 0.4). A weak association was established between late coeliac diagnosis and higher grades, but this disappeared after adjusting for parent socioeconomic conditions. Being small for gestational age affected performance negatively (adjusted coefficient -6.9, 95% CI 8.0 to 5.7). Grade scores were significantly lower in children living with a single parent (adjusted coefficient -20.6, 95% CI 20.9 to 20.2), compared with those with married/cohabiting parents. A positive association was found between scores at ninth grade and parental education and income.

Conclusion: Coeliac disease diagnosis during childhood is not associated with poor school performance at ninth grade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Achievement, celiac, disease, education, grades, income, performance and school
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75208 (URN)10.1136/archdischild-2017-312830 (DOI)000424019400011 ()28844065 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-16
Bortes, C., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2018). Health problems during childhood and school achievement: Exploring associations between hospitalization exposures, gender, timing, and compulsory school grades. PLoS ONE, 13(12), 1-14, Article ID e0208116.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health problems during childhood and school achievement: Exploring associations between hospitalization exposures, gender, timing, and compulsory school grades
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1-14, article id e0208116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims To investigate while accounting for health at birth 1) associations between health problems during childhood, measured as hospitalizations, and school achievement in the final year of compulsory school, measured as overall grade points and eligibility for upper secondary education, 2) if and how gender moderates the association between health problems and school achievement, 3) if and how the timing of a health problem during childhood is associated with later school achievement. Methods Analyzes were performed on a population-based cohort (n = 115 196) born in 1990 in Sweden (51.3% boys, 48.7% girls) using data from several national registries. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to analyze associations between study variables. Results Overall grade points and eligibility for continuation to upper secondary school were lower for individuals exposed to hospitalizations. Only the association between hospitalizations and overall grade points was moderated by gender and only for ages 13-16 years. Exposure close to actual grading had worst outcomes. Conclusions Health problems, measured through hospitalizations, was significantly associated with lower school achievements among Swedish children. Girls exposed to health problems requiring hospitalizations had relatively poorer school achievements as compared to boys. Health problems requiring hospitalization during junior high school had the greatest negative association with final achievement at compulsory school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco, CA, USA: Public Library Science, 2018
Keywords
Type-1 diabetes-mellitus, subjective health, cognitive-development, aged children, performance, complaints, behavior, outcomes, impact, income
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Social Work; Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70564 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0208116 (DOI)000452212400079 ()30517159 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Vossemer, J., Gebel, M., Täht, K., Unt, M., Högberg, B. & Strandh, M. (2018). The effects of unemployment and insecure jobs on well-being and health: The moderating role of labor market policies. Social Indicators Research, 138(3), 1229-1257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of unemployment and insecure jobs on well-being and health: The moderating role of labor market policies
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 1229-1257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Labor market insecurities have been growing in Europe and previous research has illustrated that unemployment and insecure jobs negatively affect individuals’ well-being and health. Although empirical evidence suggests that these effects vary substantially across different welfare states, we still know little about the moderating role of specific labor market policies. Taking a cross-national comparative perspective, this article investigates how passive and active labor market policies (PLMP, ALMP) as well as employment protection legislation (EPL) shape the experience of unemployment and insecure jobs. We complement micro data of round 1–6 (2002–2012) of the European Social Survey with time-varying macro indicators of PLMP, ALMP, and EPL. The data include about 89,000 individuals nested in 112 country-rounds and 26 countries respectively. We apply three-level random intercept models as well as pooled linear regression models including country fixed effects. The results show that labor market policies are important in shaping the experience of unemployment, but are less relevant for workers in insecure jobs. Specifically, higher unemployment benefit generosity buffers the negative effects of unemployment on well-being but not health. Moreover, we discuss different interpretations for the finding that higher ALMP expenditures are associated with more negative effects of unemployment on well-being and health. With respect to EPL it is found that in countries with high insider protection, deregulating the restrictions on the use of temporary employment increases the negative effects of unemployment on well-being and health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2018
Keywords
Unemployment, Temporary employment, Fixed-term contract, Job insecurity, Well-being, Life satisfaction, Happiness, Health, Comparative, Cross-national, Multi-level, Labor market policies, Welfare state, Institutions
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75209 (URN)10.1007/s11205-017-1697-y (DOI)000438558600017 ()2-s2.0-85025673826 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Brännlund, A., Strandh, M. & Nilsson, K. (2017). Mental-health and educational achievement: The link between poor mental-health and upper secondary school completion and grades. Journal of Mental Health, 26(4), 318-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental-health and educational achievement: The link between poor mental-health and upper secondary school completion and grades
2017 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Education profoundly affects adult socioeconomic status, so it is important to ensure that all children have the capability and opportunity to achieve educational goals.Aims: The study aimed to examine the relationship between mental-health during adolescence and upper secondary school completion and grades, which has received comparatively little research attention to date.Method: Longitudinal administrative and registered data were used to analyse the relationship between school achievement and prescriptions of psycholeptic and psycho-analeptic drugs. The sample consisted of all children born in Sweden in 1990 (n=109223), who were followed from birth to age 20. Logistic and OLS regressions were performed separately for boys and girls, controlling for birth health and family characteristics.Results: A negative relationship between mental-health problems and educational outcomes was found; this result was almost independent of the controls. Only minor differences between the sexes were detected.Conclusions: Poor mental-health during childhood correlated negatively with educational attainment. Given the strong link between educational success and adult life, more resources are needed to support children with mental-health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Mental-health, education, completion, grades, upper, secondary, school, Sweden
National Category
Psychiatry Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75210 (URN)10.1080/09638237.2017.1294739 (DOI)000407207800004 ()
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, K., Hammarström, A. & Strandh, M. (2017). The relationship between work and family preferences and behaviors: A longitudinal study of gender differences in Sweden. Acta Sociologica, 60(2), 120-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between work and family preferences and behaviors: A longitudinal study of gender differences in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proposed theories to explain gender inequality in the labor market and family, such as gender specialization within families and gender segregation in the labor markets, lack consideration for individual preferences. Preference theory accounts for individual choice and gendered preferences but has been substantially criticized, indicating a need for further research. This study uses Swedish longitudinal data to explore how preferences for work and family relate to behavior. We explore three critical issues raised in previous research: gender differences in preferences; the relationship between work and family changes and subsequent preferences; how preferences relate to work and family behaviors. Our results showed small general gender differences in preferences, although women had a stronger preference for both children and work than men. Changes in work status were further related to changes in work preferences, while changes in family status were related to changes in family preferences. Moreover, preferences had poor predictive power in relation to work and family behaviors. Our results indicate that preferences do not explain gender inequality in Sweden. The relationship between preferences and behaviors seems bidirectional and preferences and behavior within the family sphere has little to do with preferences and behavior within the work sphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Gender, family, labor market, preferences, longitudinal, Sweden
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65482 (URN)10.1177/0001699316659322 (DOI)000400089400002 ()
Available from: 2017-12-29 Created: 2017-12-29 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Johansson Sevä, I., Vinberg, s., Nordenmark, M. & Strandh, M. (2016). Subjective well-being among the self-employed in Europe:macroeconomy, gender and immigrant status. Small Business Economics, 46(2), 239-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective well-being among the self-employed in Europe:macroeconomy, gender and immigrant status
2016 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research shows that the self-employed generally experience a higher degree of job satisfaction compared to regular employees. However, our knowledge of subjective well-being among the self-employed, the differences between various groups of self-employed and the potential influence of contextual factors is somewhat limited. The purpose of the present paper is to address this gap by taking macroeconomic conditions, gender and immigrant status into consideration. The results show that self-employment is positively related to subjective well-being, but there are also differences between groups of the self-employed; self-employed with employees report a higher level of life satisfaction than the self-employed without employees. Economic growth is more important for the level of life satisfaction among the self-employed than among employees. The analyses also point to different patterns for female and male self-employed without employees: only women experience a higher level of life satisfaction compared to employees. The results also show that the relationship is stronger among immigrants than natives. The results of this study confirm the importance of considering potential heterogeneity when examining subjective well-being among the self-employed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Self-employment; Subjective well-being; Life satisfaction; Economic growth; Immigrant status; Gender; Europe
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-39199 (URN)10.1007/s11187-015-9682-9 (DOI)000368738300004 ()
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, V., Johansson Sevä, I. & Strandh, M. (2016). Subjective well-being and job satisfaction among self-employed and regular employees: does personality matter differently?. Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, 28(1), 55-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective well-being and job satisfaction among self-employed and regular employees: does personality matter differently?
2016 (English)In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about the importance of personality traits for subjective well-being

(SWB) and job satisfaction among self-employed. The aim of this article is to

investigate if the Big-Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness,

conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness to experience) have different

relationships with SWB and job satisfaction among self-employed compared with

regular employees. Data come from a Swedish survey comprising representative

samples of self-employed (n D 2483) and regular employees (n D 2642). Personality

traits are measured using a 10-item personality measure. Our findings show that there

are only small differences, between self-employed and regular employees, in the

associations between personality traits and SWB. For job satisfaction, on the other

hand, we find much stronger relationships for self-employed than the regularly

employed. For self-employed, every personality trait except ‘openness to experience’

have a significant positive relationship with job satisfaction. In comparison, only

‘extraversion’ and ‘emotional stability’ are significantly correlated to job satisfaction

among regular employees. The relationship between ‘extraversion’ and job

satisfaction was furthermore substantially weaker among regular employees.

Therefore, being self-employed seems to be particularly beneficial for individuals

scoring high on ‘extraversion,’ ‘agreeableness,’ and ‘conscientiousness.’

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-39204 (URN)10.1080/08276331.2015.1115699 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6867-6205

Search in DiVA

Show all publications