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Fast, K. (2024). Who Has the Right to the Coworking Space?: Reframing Platformed Workspaces as Elite Territory in the Geomedia City. Space and Culture, 27(1), 48-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who Has the Right to the Coworking Space?: Reframing Platformed Workspaces as Elite Territory in the Geomedia City
2024 (English)In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 48-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current research suggests that coworking spaces (CWS) both respond to and legitimize work precarization. This is an important critique. Less acknowledged, however, is the fact that CWS also (re)produce eliteness. Thus, to the aim of offering perspectives that remain underrepresented in CWS research, I here scrutinize CWS as promotors of class privilege. I build my case on the premise that class privilege has to do with more than merely economic superiority and seek to dismantle, in particular, the role of geomedia technologies in the (re)production of CWS eliteness. With clues derived from a literature review as well as analyses of real-life cases, I here recognize CWS as places of elite (non-)consumption, as hubs of elite mobility, as nodes in elite networks, and, ultimately, as elite territories in the (super-)gentrified geomedia city. I end my article by reflecting on the dialectics of CWS eliteness, thereby suggesting how precariousness and eliteness are interlinked.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
Keywords
coworking space, elite, geomedia, gentrification, social stratification
National Category
Media and Communications Human Geography
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96682 (URN)10.1177/12063312221090429 (DOI)000811804000001 ()2-s2.0-85131812912 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2023-09-12 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. (2023). Coworking spaces as postdigital territories: Prospects and paradoxes of the (dis)connected workplace. In: : . Paper presented at Annual meeting. American Association of Geographers (AAG), 23-27 March 2023. Denver, Colorado, U.S.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coworking spaces as postdigital territories: Prospects and paradoxes of the (dis)connected workplace
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Denver, Colorado, U.S.: , 2023
Keywords
Work, post-digital, coworking spaces, territoriality, media, gentrification
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96932 (URN)
Conference
Annual meeting. American Association of Geographers (AAG), 23-27 March 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-01928
Available from: 2023-10-09 Created: 2023-10-09 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Enli, G. & Fast, K. (2023). Political Solutions or user Responsibilization?: How Politicians understand Problems Connected to Digital Overload. Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 29(3), 675-689
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Political Solutions or user Responsibilization?: How Politicians understand Problems Connected to Digital Overload
2023 (English)In: Convergence. The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, ISSN 1354-8565, E-ISSN 1748-7382, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 675-689Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Politicians are decision-makers responsible for policy and opinion leaders with unique powers to construct challenges and problems as political. An emerging problematic issue pertains to users’ experiences of digital overload and invasive media (Syvertsen 2020; Lomborg and Ytre-Arne, 2021). Existing studies report that users struggle to self-regulate their digital media use – or ‘disconnect’. This relates to how connectivity platforms develop increasingly advanced techniques to keep them from logging off (Karppi 2018; Zuboff, 2019; Ytre-Arne et al., 2020).

This article aims to unpack how politicians understand problems about digital overload and invasive media and to what degree they regard digital disconnection as a potential political issue. We have selected Norway as our case country because of the population’s level of digital connectivity and the tradition of media regulation in the Nordic region (Syvertsen et al., 2014). Based on 16 research interviews with politicians and think-thank experts and a document analysis of official party-political platforms, we ask to what degree the politicians experience digital overload and invasive media as problematic, and if so, whom they believe is responsible for causing and solving the problems, and what specific solutions they suggest to the issues. In addition to digital disconnection literature, we draw on theoretical perspectives from media policy, political theory, and responsibilization.

Key findings indicate that politicians regard digital overload and invasive media as highly problematic. However, they are reluctant to suggest political interventions as solutions to these problems but rather place responsibility on the users and the platform industries. The politicians struggle to imagine political interventions that could help users disconnect while respecting personal authority and are doubtful about their power vis-à-vis the global tech companies. The article concludes with a critical discussion about the politicians’ acceptance of the neoliberal idea of responsibilization. This ultimately produces a reluctance to discuss disconnection as a political issue, not just an individual challenge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
Digital disconnection, digital overload, invasive media, neoliberalism, responsibilization, media policy, digital platforms, media dependence, politicians
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96683 (URN)10.1177/13548565231160618 (DOI)000953436100001 ()2-s2.0-85149959531 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, Grant no. 287563The Research Council of Norway
Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2023-09-12 Last updated: 2023-09-18Bibliographically approved
Syvertsen, T. & Fast, K. (2023). Postdigital consumption: The case of the mobile phone box. In: : . Paper presented at International Communication Association, 73rd Annual Conference, Toronto, 25-29 May 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postdigital consumption: The case of the mobile phone box
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Postdigital, consumption, mobile phone box, discourse, public debate
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96966 (URN)
Conference
International Communication Association, 73rd Annual Conference, Toronto, 25-29 May 2023
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 287563
Available from: 2023-10-11 Created: 2023-10-11 Last updated: 2024-01-24Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. (2023). 'Remember to unplug': Expressions of the post-digitalization of work inside and beyond coworking spaces. In: : . Paper presented at 4th Mediatization Conference, Lublin, Poland, 17 May 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Remember to unplug': Expressions of the post-digitalization of work inside and beyond coworking spaces
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on empirical insights from two ongoing research projects, both of which are concerned with how we live and work with – or without – digital media: Hot desks in cool places: Coworking spaces as post-digital industry and movement (Karlstad University, PI André Jansson) and Intrusive media, ambivalent users, and digital detox (Digitox) (University of Oslo, PI Trine Syvertsen). With cues taken mainly from multi-sited ethnography in coworking spaces and qualitative interviews with (dis-)connected knowledge workers, I inquire about top-down and bottom-up forms of boundary work that are undertaken to produce particular workstyles and workspaces. I pay particular attention to expressions of what I shall call ’the post-digitalization of work’; that is, to the socio-spatial shaping of contemporary (knowledge) work by disconnectivity ideals and feelings of digital unease. 

Keywords
Work, post-digital, coworking spaces, territoriality, media, ethnography
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96930 (URN)
Conference
4th Mediatization Conference, Lublin, Poland, 17 May 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-01928
Available from: 2023-10-09 Created: 2023-10-09 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. & Jansson, A. (2023). The Post-Digital Self: How Transmedia Dissolves the Boundaries of Work and Tourism (1sted.). In: James Dalby, Matthew Freeman (Ed.), Transmedia Selves: Identity and Persona Creation in the Age of Mobile and Multiplatform Media (pp. 52-66). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Post-Digital Self: How Transmedia Dissolves the Boundaries of Work and Tourism
2023 (English)In: Transmedia Selves: Identity and Persona Creation in the Age of Mobile and Multiplatform Media / [ed] James Dalby, Matthew Freeman, London: Routledge, 2023, 1st, p. 52-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter assesses the social consequences of transmedia as a regime of cultural circulation through two thematic lenses: work and tourism. Based on our previous fieldwork, as well as the work of others, we hold that transmedia feeds into and provides new facets to geo-social de-differentiation as diagnosed by postmodern (or, “late-modern”) sociologists in the 1980s and 1990s. This means, above all, that social realms that used to be delimited in time and space are increasingly open-ended, which, in turn, has a profound impact on how relations between self and society are negotiated. Focusing on work and tourism, we try to show how people’s engagement with transmedia fuses realms that were once taken as the moral and social opposites. On the one hand, “transmedia work” denotes a social condition marked by the growing prominence of strategic recognition work and liquid boundaries between leisure and labour. On the other hand, “transmedia tourism” captures not just the growing presence of touristic expressivity in everyday life, but also the growing day-to-day significance of logistical practices - which ultimately constitute another kind of work - in the creation of tourism phantasmagoria. The chapter begins with a positioning of our analysis in relation to the theoretical discourses of transmedia and postmodern de-differentiation. The following two parts use empirical examples to tease out the characteristics of “transmedia work” and “transmedia tourism”, respectively, as increasingly liquid and contradictory social terrains. In the final section we bring together the discussions into an argument concerning (1) the prospects of revisiting postmodern theory as a way of conceptualizing social consequences of transmedia and (2) the relevance of strategic recognition work and logistical work as complementary perspectives for grasping the role of transmedia in the formation of contemporary selves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2023 Edition: 1st
Series
Routledge Advances in Transmedia Studies
Keywords
Transmedia, work, tourism, post-digital, identity
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96684 (URN)10.4324/9781003134015-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85174133185 (Scopus ID)9780367680572 (ISBN)9781003134015 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2023-09-12 Last updated: 2023-11-27Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Jansson, A., Lindell, J. & Bengtsson, S. (2023). “They say it has ruined their lives”: A mixed-method study of how digital natives judge their own and other people’s smartphone use. In: : . Paper presented at International Communication Association (ICA), 73rd Annual Conference, Mobile Communication Division, 25-29 May 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“They say it has ruined their lives”: A mixed-method study of how digital natives judge their own and other people’s smartphone use
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Digital natives, mobile media, media use, third-person effect, morality
National Category
Media and Communications Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96934 (URN)
Conference
International Communication Association (ICA), 73rd Annual Conference, Mobile Communication Division, 25-29 May 2023
Funder
Anne-Marie and Gustaf Anders Foundation for Media Research
Available from: 2023-10-09 Created: 2023-10-09 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. (2023). Workplace territoriality in the postdigital age: Insights from a "hot-desking" ethnography in coworking spaces. In: : . Paper presented at NOS-HS Mobility, Sociality and Digital Media Connections in Times of Crisis, Lund, 17-18 April, 2023.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace territoriality in the postdigital age: Insights from a "hot-desking" ethnography in coworking spaces
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on the concepts of territoriality and the postdigital as well as preliminary empirical insights from a multi-method study, combining discourse analysis and multi-sited ethnography in a number of coworking spaces. The paper inquires about manifestations of top-down workplace territoriality, with a focus on the role of media (non-)use in the diversification of space.  

Keywords
Work, post-digital, coworking spaces, territoriality, media, ethnography
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96929 (URN)
Conference
NOS-HS Mobility, Sociality and Digital Media Connections in Times of Crisis, Lund, 17-18 April, 2023
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-01928
Available from: 2023-10-09 Created: 2023-10-09 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Lindell, J., Jansson, A. & Fast, K. (2022). I'm here!: Conspicuous geomedia practices and the reproduction of social positions on social media. Information, Communication and Society (14), 2063-2082
Open this publication in new window or tab >>I'm here!: Conspicuous geomedia practices and the reproduction of social positions on social media
2022 (English)In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, no 14, p. 2063-2082Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

'Checking in' at or 'tagging' oneself to various places on social media constitute online representations that contribute to the classification, or 'making', of places. At the same time, users are also classified based on what they (show that they) do where. In this paper, we deploy Bourdieusian cultural sociology to the realm of place-exposing geomedia practices to understand social reproduction on social media. The study uses multiple correspondence analysis on a national survey deployed in Sweden (n=3,902). Various place-exposing practices are analyzed in relation to the contemporary Swedish class structure. Results reveal a connection between various forms and volumes of capital and the places that people visit and chose to put on display for online audiences. We are thus able to verify how the socio-technological regime of geomedia, with its new arenas for online exposure, extends deep-seated dynamics of socio-cultural reproduction and even reinforces the classificatory linkages between spatial appropriation and social identity work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Bourdieu, social media, media use, social class, multiple correspondence analysis
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-84105 (URN)10.1080/1369118X.2021.1925322 (DOI)000651307700001 ()2-s2.0-85106296149 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-31 Created: 2021-05-31 Last updated: 2022-12-19Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. & Abend, P. (2022). Introduction to geomedia histories. New Media and Society, 24(11), 2385-2395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to geomedia histories
2022 (English)In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 2385-2395Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The maturation of mobile, convergent, and place-contingent technologies has inspired researchers from different fields to re-imagine the relationship between geography and media. Recently, the linking of site-specific media and mediatized places culminated in the overarching concept that sits at the midpoint of this special issue: geomedia. While the majority of work within geomedia studies focuses on contemporary developments, thereby offering snapshots of geomediatization processes as these currently manifest themselves, this volume wants to address the nexus of geography and media from a decidedly historical perspective. Doing so, we hope to inspire a historical turn in geomedia studies as well as contribute to the ongoing discussion about how to define geomedia (studies) beyond (the study of) particular technologies or media genres. By boldly uprooting the geomedia concept from its contemporary, predominantly digital, framework, the contributions gathered here encourage us to map the trajectories of geomedia, to challenge "geomediatization realism," to remedy epistemological biases, and to further articulate the postdigital.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Geomedia, geomediatization, historical turn, history, place, postdigital, space
National Category
Communication Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-92281 (URN)10.1177/14614448221122168 (DOI)000865102100001 ()2-s2.0-85139515777 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-27 Created: 2022-10-27 Last updated: 2022-10-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6309-2315

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