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Fast, K. (2018). A Discursive Approach to Mediatisation: Corporate Technology Discourse and the Trope of Media Indispensability. Media and Communication, 6(2), 15-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Discursive Approach to Mediatisation: Corporate Technology Discourse and the Trope of Media Indispensability
2018 (English)In: Media and Communication, ISSN 2083-5701, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hitherto, and mainly by way of ethnographic studies, mediatisation research has informed us regarding the relevance, influence, and role of media in various spheres of social life. Less is known, however, about how mediatisation is discursively constructed. The relevance of constructivist approaches to mediatisation has been explicated, e.g., by Krotz (2017), who calls for critical mediatisation studies that consider the economic interests of mediatisation stakeholders, including the ICT industry. Against this backdrop, this article scrutinizes what the alleged 'mobility revolution' entails according to some who would benefit most from such a revolution. More concretely, the article studies the discursive practices of three leading corporations in the mobile communications sector: IBM, Huawei,and Ericsson. Stimulated by critical mediatisation theory as well as related accounts of the (technology) discourse-reality relationship, the article asks: if mobile media changes 'everything' in life-whose lives are being changed? If mobile media are 'indispensable' to modern ways of living-what are they supposed to do? Ultimately, the article speaks to the theme of this thematic issue by interrogating how contemporary mobile technology discourse contributes to the (re-)production of social space. Findings suggest that mediatisation is constructed as the response to an internal human drive for connectivity and as an inexorable natural force. Three sub-discourses on mobile technology are identified: 'technologies of cosmos', 'technologies of self', and, ultimately, 'technologies of life'. Altogether, these sub-discourses disclose and reinforce the hegemonic nature of mediatisation by communicating the indispensability of mobile media in modern-notably, urban and privileged-lives. In addition to providing answers to the study's empirical questions, the article includes a discussion about the potential implications of existing discourse overlaps between ICT companies and mediatisation theorists, as well as a sketch for an agenda for the 'discursive turn' in mediatisation studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lisbon: Cogitatio Press, 2018
Keywords
discursive turn, media indispensability, mediatisation, mobile media, mobility revolution, technology discourse, Social Construction of Technology (SCOT), social space
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67650 (URN)10.17645/mac.v6i2.1311 (DOI)000433079800003 ()
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Jansson, A., Lindell, J., Ryan Bengtsson, L. & Tesfahuney, M. (Eds.). (2018). Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds
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2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book introduces and develops the concept of geomedia studies as the name of a particular subfield of communication geography. Despite the accelerating societal relevance of 'geomedia' technologies for the production of various spaces, mobilities, and power-relations, and the unquestionable emergence of a vibrant research field that deals with questions pertaining to such topics, the term geomedia studies remains surprisingly unestablished. By addressing imperative questions about the implications of geomedia technologies for organizations, social groups and individuals (e.g. businesses profiting from geo-surveillance, refugees or migrants moving across national borders, or artists claiming their rights to public space) the book also aims to contribute to ongoing academic and societal debates in our increasingly mediatized world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018. p. 277
National Category
Media and Communications Cultural Studies Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65497 (URN)978-1-138-22152-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Jansson, A., Lindell, J., Ryan Bengtsson, L. & Tesfahuney, M. (2018). Introducing Geomedia Studies. In: Fast, Karin; Jansson, André; Lindell, Johan; Ryan Bengtsson, Linda; Tesfahuney, Mekonnen (Ed.), Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing Geomedia Studies
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2018 (English)In: Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds / [ed] Fast, Karin; Jansson, André; Lindell, Johan; Ryan Bengtsson, Linda; Tesfahuney, Mekonnen, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65498 (URN)978-1-138-22152-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Jansson, A., Tesfahuney, M., Ryan Bengtsson, L. & Lindell, J. (2018). Introduction to Geomedia Studies. In: Fast, Karin; Jansson, André; Lindell, Johan; Ryan-Bengtsson, Linda; Tesfahuney, mekonnen (Ed.), Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds (pp. 1-18). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to Geomedia Studies
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2018 (English)In: Geomedia Studies: Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds / [ed] Fast, Karin; Jansson, André; Lindell, Johan; Ryan-Bengtsson, Linda; Tesfahuney, mekonnen, Routledge, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70053 (URN)978-1-138-22152-9 (ISBN)9781315410210 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Ryan Bengtsson, L., Edlom, J. & Fast, K. (2018). "#LookWhatYouMadeMeDo" Mobilizing fans in the contemporary music industry: - the Taylor Swift case. In: : . Paper presented at ECREA, the 7th European Communication Conference (ECC), "Centres and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation", October 31 - November 3, 2018, Lugano, Switzerland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"#LookWhatYouMadeMeDo" Mobilizing fans in the contemporary music industry: - the Taylor Swift case
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

On August 21, 2017, American superstar Taylor Swift launched an immersive marketing campaign for her upcoming album “Reputation”. Her first action consisted in a 10 second black and white film clip of a rattling snake. The clip was posted simultaneously on her personal Facebook and Instagram accounts and, generated massive response from her fans, who immediately started to speculate about Swift’s intentions with the video footage. The clip was the first of several efforts to invite consumers to participate in the album’s transmedia marketing campaign. The rattling snake video was followed by an international social media campaign effectively interconnecting diverse digital media platforms (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr). The campaign involved very few traditional media appearances, but relied all the more on fan-based content and fan-initiated events. The fan base was anticipated to co-create content and take part in different joint events, not only online but also offline through for example pop-up museums, home-visits, and pop-up stores. 

 

The music industry utilizes transmedia marketing due to its potential to foster fan engagement, or, as we understand it in this paper – fan labour. Fans produce and circulate content and facilitate the engineering of targeted marketing initiatives. The Swift campaign is thus an up-to-date example of how contemporary transmedia marketingemploy offline and online spaces to mobilize fans across and beyond media platforms. Buthow do fans responds to transmedia marketing and how do they navigate, act and perform across these online and offline spaces?

 

This study investigates fan labour through a digital multi-method approach to the Swifttransmedia campaign. By collecting data from the artist’s social media accounts and hashtags specified by the campaign, we capture fan responses, actions, interactions and productions related to ‘laid out’ trails between the campaign’s online and offline spaces. The quantitative material allows us to map how fans move in the marketing time-space. Furthermore, the quantitative method guides us to places where more advanced forms of fan labour occur. As to deepen our understanding of how fan labour is performed within the Swiftmarketing universe, we complement the big data sampling with qualitative studies of specific transmedia places of engagement.

 

Our results show that Swift fans (or ‘Swifties’) follow the paths prepared by the marketers. By placing events in different campaign milieus and by taking full advantage of technological affordances, fans are encouraged to migrate between campaign places. We identify different forms of labour in these places; notably, fans produce and share content with campaign producers as well as within their own networks, thus giving the campaign access to their social media networks and their productions. However, our study also detects instances of fan resistance. Fans use their voice to question specific campaign activities or if they feel sidestepped. Ultimately, our paper scrutinizes the blurry interplay between industry and fan engagement in transmedia spaces and offer – much needed – spatial perspectives on fan labour.

 

National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70524 (URN)
Conference
ECREA, the 7th European Communication Conference (ECC), "Centres and Peripheries: Communication, Research, Translation", October 31 - November 3, 2018, Lugano, Switzerland
Funder
Interreg Sweden-Norway, 20200011
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Fast, K. (2018). The Longue Durée of Transmedia Work. In: : . Paper presented at AAG Annual Meeting 10-14 April New Orleans.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Longue Durée of Transmedia Work
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper deals with the transformation of work under the pressures of mediatization. Mediatization is here understood as a historical process of media-induced change that establishes tensions between emancipating forces and increasing socio-technological dependence. The paper seeks to make sense of mediatized work and its implications by covering forms of work that has either been reconfigured through changes in the media system or developed as a direct response to mediatization and the accompanying post-Fordist regime of work.

Keywords
Work, transmedia, mediatization, long durée
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69590 (URN)
Conference
AAG Annual Meeting 10-14 April New Orleans
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Örnebring, H., Karlsson, M., Fast, K. & Lindell, J. (2018). The Space of Journalistic Work: A Theoretical Model. Communication Theory, 28(04), 403-423
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Space of Journalistic Work: A Theoretical Model
2018 (English)In: Communication Theory, ISSN 1050-3293, E-ISSN 1468-2885, Vol. 28, no 04, p. 403-423Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Attempts to define journalism are often normative in nature but do not add to our theoretical understanding of what journalism is. There is a need for journalism scholarship to recognize explicitly that journalism is a space in which participants are not equal—or even similar—in terms of status, influence, work tasks, and working conditions. This paper offers a theoretical model combining the field theory of Pierre Bourdieu with recent insights from the sociology of work in order to articulate how journalistic work is stratified across three dimensions: journalistic capital, resource access, and material security. These dimensions create a space in which to place different types of journalistic work in order to make sense of contemporary journalism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
Keywords
Journalistic Work, Precarity, Field Theory, Capital, Media Organizations, Media Sociology, Citizen Journalism, News Access, Labor, Media, Rise, Pay
National Category
Social Sciences Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69587 (URN)10.1093/ct/qty006 (DOI)000452676200001 ()
Note

Founded by The Anne-Marie och Gustaf Anders Foundation for Media Research; The Ander Centre for Research on News and Opinion in the Digital Era (NODE).

Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Jansson, A. & Fast, K. (2018). Transmedia Identities: From Fan Cultures to Liquid Lives. In: Freeman, Matthew and Renira Rampazzo Gambarato (Ed.), The Routledge Companion to Transmedia Studies.: (pp. 340-349). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transmedia Identities: From Fan Cultures to Liquid Lives
2018 (English)In: The Routledge Companion to Transmedia Studies. / [ed] Freeman, Matthew and Renira Rampazzo Gambarato, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 340-349Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70059 (URN)978-1-138-48343-9 (ISBN)978-1-351-05490-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Ryan Bengtsson, L. & Ferrer Conill, R. (2017). A spatial approach to fan labor: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing. In: : . Paper presented at Locating Imagination: Popular Culture, Tourism and Belonging conference, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 5th – 7th April, 2017, Rotterdam, The Netherlands..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A spatial approach to fan labor: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo (2015) on Spotify, she mobilized her fans through an immersive marketing campaign that stretched across and beyond media platforms: an 8-bit game, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Dreamhack, and a major Swedish music festival were key campaign platforms. The campaign construction was hardly unique, but rather illustrative of current trends in cultural production, including transmedia marketing and the increasing reliance on fan labor.This paper argues that informed spatial approaches to fan labor, and business strategies aimed to cultivate such labor, are missing in the existing research on cultural production. While descriptions of our transmediatized culture often-times do include spatial metaphors, such as “flow”, “stream”, “fluid”, and “liquid”, our conviction is that a more serious engagement with geography is vital for understanding, mapping, and ultimately critiquing industry practices that potentially are exploitive, unethical, and even harmful.Therefore, this paper suggests a theoretical framework for exploring the geographies of fan labor and presents exemplifying cartographies of authentic music marketing campaigns. The framework is influenced by two recent ‘turns’ in media and communication studies: the labor turn and the spatial turn. From labor theory, we borrow the idea that consumer engagement can be read as labor that is typically unpaid, affective, and voluntarily given. Spatial theory, next, provides us with a conceptual toolbox to disentangle the spatiality of transmedia marketing, including the relationship between physical and virtual elements.The notion of ‘transmediascape’ is brought in to describe the embodiment of transmedia marketing – in mediated and non-mediated spaces and flows. Such transmediascapes, the paper argues, can be read as the perfect soil for fan labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble fan affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Due to its multifaceted connotation – pointing towards both affectivity and mobility – the term ‘mobilization’ fruitfully bridges labor theory and spatial theory and serves, ultimately, as a key concept for analyzing contemporary forms of cultural production.

Keywords
Fan labour, transmediascapes, affect, mobility, marketing
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62524 (URN)
Conference
Locating Imagination: Popular Culture, Tourism and Belonging conference, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 5th – 7th April, 2017, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Available from: 2017-07-22 Created: 2017-07-22 Last updated: 2018-03-01Bibliographically approved
Fast, K., Ryan Bengtsson, L. & Ferrer Conill, R. (2017). A spatial approach to fan labour: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing. In: : . Paper presented at Locating imagination: Popular culture, tourism and belonging. April 5-7, 2017, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Erasmus University of Rotterdam
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A spatial approach to fan labour: Conceptualizing fan mobilization in transmedia marketing
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When Swedish artist Tove Styrke released her album Kiddo (2015) on Spotify, she mobilized her fans through an immersive marketing campaign that stretched across and beyond media platforms: an 8-bit game, Spotify, Facebook, Twitter, Dreamhack, and a major Swedish music festival were key campaign platforms. The campaign construction was hardly unique, but rather illustrative of current trends in cultural production, including transmedia marketing and the increasing reliance on fan labor.This paper argues that informed spatial approaches to fan labor, and business strategies aimed to cultivate such labor, are missing in the existing research on cultural production. While descriptions of our transmediatized culture often-times do include spatial metaphors, such as “flow”, “stream”, “fluid”, and “liquid”, our conviction is that a more serious engagement with geography is vital for understanding, mapping, and ultimately critiquing industry practices that potentially are exploitive, unethical, and even harmful.Therefore, this paper suggests a theoretical framework for exploring the geographies of fan labor and presents exemplifying cartographies of authentic music marketing campaigns. The framework is influenced by two recent ‘turns’ in media and communication studies: the labor turn and the spatial turn. From labor theory, we borrow the idea that consumer engagement can be read as labor that is typically unpaid, affective, and voluntarily given. Spatial theory, next, provides us with a conceptual toolbox to disentangle the spatiality of transmedia marketing, including the relationship between physical and virtual elements.The notion of ‘transmediascape’ is brought in to describe the embodiment of transmedia marketing – in mediated and non-mediated spaces and flows. Such transmediascapes, the paper argues, can be read as the perfect soil for fan labor since they mobilize consumers in more than one respect: they assemble fan affect and, at the same time, encourage physical as well as virtual fan movement. Due to its multifaceted connotation – pointing towards both affectivity and mobility – the term ‘mobilization’ fruitfully bridges labor theory and spatial theory and serves, ultimately, as a key concept for analyzing contemporary forms of cultural production

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Erasmus University of Rotterdam, 2017
Keywords
Transmediascape, free labour, geographies, transmedia, political ecology, case study, One Direction
National Category
Media and Communications Cultural Studies Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66556 (URN)
Conference
Locating imagination: Popular culture, tourism and belonging. April 5-7, 2017, Rotterdam, Netherlands
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-07-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6309-2315

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