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Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Uppal, C. (2019). Over time and beyond disney-visualizing princesses through a comparative study in India, Fiji, and Sweden. Social Sciences, 8(4), Article ID 105.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Over time and beyond disney-visualizing princesses through a comparative study in India, Fiji, and Sweden
2019 (English)In: Social Sciences, ISSN 2076-0760, E-ISSN 2076-0760, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disney animated princesses are broadcasted around the world through Disney Channel and its global affliates as well as through numerous other networks that purchase distribution rights. In an attempt to provide diversity in the last 25 years, Disney has featured nonwestern princesses such as those in Aladdin (1992), Pocahontas (1995), Mulan (1998), and Moana (2016). This study examines how princesses in animated Disney movies are perceived and understood by girls (8-15 years) in three different countries, over two time-periods with a gap of nearly a decade (2009 and 2018). The primary research question, considering Disney's global reach, is how race, culture, and presence of a royal family interact with transnational access to the same media content in the perception of the princess concept and about being a girl. The selected countries provide an opportunity to explore differences in perception of Disney princesses between girls raised in countries with and without a royal family, and between girls in nonwestern and western countries. Differences in the perception are attributed to local and national cultures that allow a different lens to view the same content. A mixed method combining interviews, focus groups, and participant-generated images was used to gather data in India, Fiji, and Sweden. Results indicate Disney princesses, with their ubiquitous presence in various formats, e.g., media content, costumes and school stationery, have created a uniform idea of beauty across countries. Princesses in Disney were perceived by participants as being Caucasian and American, regardless of the race or country they represented. Girls in India and Fiji did not identify with Jasmine or Mulan, whom they considered 'American', whereas girls in Sweden considered Jasmine and Mulan as princesses of nonwestern origin. Girls in India and Fiji did not think they could be princesses because of their skin color, and did not want to lead a life 'restricted with responsibilities', but girls in Sweden considered the same question from the place of a choice, i.e., they preferred not to lead a 'boring' and regulated life like that of a princess. Participants from Fiji, with the least access to domestic programming that showed girls of their same Fijian origin, were least likely to consider themselves capable of being a princess.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
Beauty, Disney, Girls, Princess, Transnational media
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73341 (URN)10.3390/socsci8040105 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067115215 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-09-23Bibliographically approved
Cheruiyot, D. & Uppal, C. (2019). Pan-Africanism as a laughing matter: (Funny) expressions of African identity on Twitter. Journal of African Media Studies, 11(2), 257-274, Article ID 18.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pan-Africanism as a laughing matter: (Funny) expressions of African identity on Twitter
2019 (English)In: Journal of African Media Studies, ISSN 2040-199X, E-ISSN 1751-7974, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 257-274, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pan-Africanism, a concept that attempts to capture the essence of being an African, needs to be reconsidered in the age of social media. In this article, we examine how Twitter users negotiate the question of African identity through humorous hashtagdriven conversations. We specifically question whether a new kind of Pan-Africanism is emerging on Africa’s Twitterverse through the use of a popular hashtag in 2015, #IfAfricaWasABar. In our analysis of tweets linked to #IfAfricaWasABar, we conclude that Twitter provides temporary solidarity by engaging users in humorous exchanges regarding the sociocultural, political and economic issues that define the African continental condition today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Intellect Ltd., 2019
Keywords
#IfAfricaWasABar, Pan-Africanism, Twitter, globalization, humour, identity
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74492 (URN)10.1386/jams.11.2.257_1 (DOI)000482129400007 ()
Available from: 2019-08-23 Created: 2019-08-23 Last updated: 2019-09-16Bibliographically approved
Uppal, C., Sartoretto, P. & Cheruiyot, D. (2019). The case for communication rights: A rights-based approach to media development. Global Media and Communication, 1-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The case for communication rights: A rights-based approach to media development
2019 (English)In: Global Media and Communication, ISSN 1742-7665, E-ISSN 1742-7673, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

From the 1980s, international organizations have devised strategies to develop national media systems to make them more diverse and inclusive so as to both exhibit and preserve local cultures. However, these strategies have not always been successful since information has become a commodity, because the interests of private actors prevent equal access to communication rights. This article outlines a perspective on media development from a rights-based approach, derived from a critique of dominant perspectives from international organizations with a strong focus on technology provisions. The article argues for media development based on the right to communication as an alternative to commodification of information. Through examples from Brazil and Kenya, the article illustrates that viewing communication as a basic right can lead to the inclusion of more voices in the public discourse. In addition, a model for media development is proposed, suggesting that the state and national civil society play a significant role in promoting diverse national public spheres.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Brazil, communication rights, Kenya, media development, media systems
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75138 (URN)10.1177/1742766519871686 (DOI)
Note

This paper won the Top Paper Award from the Global Communication and Social Change Division of the 66th Annual International Communication Association (ICA) Conference in Fukuoka, Japan, on June 10, 2016.

Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Cheruiyot, D. & Uppal, C. (2018). Pan-Africanism as a laughing matter: (Funny) Expressions of African identity on Twitter. In: : . Paper presented at The 68th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), Prague, Czech Republic, May 24-28, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pan-Africanism as a laughing matter: (Funny) Expressions of African identity on Twitter
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pan-Africanism, a concept that attempts to capture the essence of being an African, needs to be reconsidered in the age of interactive social media. In this chapter, we look at how Twitter users negotiate the question of African identity through humourous hashtag-driven conversations. We specifically interrogate the question whether a new kind of Pan-Africanism is emerging on Africa’s Twitterverse through the use of a popular hashtag in 2015, #IfAfricaWasABar. In our analysis of tweets linked to #IfAfricaWasABar, we conclude that Twitter provides temporary solidarity by engaging users in humorous exchanges about socio-cultural, political and economic issues that define the African continental condition today. 

Keywords
#IfAfricaWasABar, globalization, humour, identity, Pan-Africanism, Twitter
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68587 (URN)
Conference
The 68th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), Prague, Czech Republic, May 24-28, 2018
Note

A version of this paper will be published as a book chapter in T. Ngomba, P.  Nielsen & J.  Gustafsson. (2019), Civic Agency in Africa: Arts of Resistances in the 21st Century by Nordicom (Gothenburg).

Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2018-07-27Bibliographically approved
Uppal, C. (2017). Claiming Their Heritage: Re-Discovering India Through Cyber-Dialogue. In: : . Paper presented at "Interventions: Communication Research and Practice" - The 67th Annual Conference of International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Division: Global Communication and Social Change.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Claiming Their Heritage: Re-Discovering India Through Cyber-Dialogue
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Citizen Mobilisation, Twitter, New Media
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64005 (URN)
Conference
"Interventions: Communication Research and Practice" - The 67th Annual Conference of International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Division: Global Communication and Social Change
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Uppal, C. (2017). Diaspora, Meaning and Assimilation: Geography, Media and Communication. In: : . Paper presented at "Interventions: Communication Research and Practice" - The 67th Annual Conference of International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Division: Global Communication and Social Change.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diaspora, Meaning and Assimilation: Geography, Media and Communication
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Diaspora, Media, Cultural assimilation
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64006 (URN)
Conference
"Interventions: Communication Research and Practice" - The 67th Annual Conference of International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, 25-29 May 2017. Division: Global Communication and Social Change
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Uppal, C. (2017). Digital Divide, Diasporic Identity, and a Spiritual Upgrade. In: Balaji, Murali (Ed.), Digital Hinduism: Dharma and Discourse in the Age of New Media. USA: Lexington Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Divide, Diasporic Identity, and a Spiritual Upgrade
2017 (English)In: Digital Hinduism: Dharma and Discourse in the Age of New Media / [ed] Balaji, Murali, USA: Lexington Books, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: Lexington Books, 2017
Series
Explorations in Indic Traditions: Theological, Ethical, and Philosophical
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63798 (URN)1498559174 (ISBN)9781498559171 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Ferrer Conill, R. & Uppal, C. (2017). Risk and trust in crisis communication: A qualitative study of information intermediaries in Ghana. In: : . Paper presented at 67th Annual Conference: Interventions: Communication Research and Practice. International Communication Association, San Diego, USA, 25-29 of Maj 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk and trust in crisis communication: A qualitative study of information intermediaries in Ghana
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62526 (URN)
Conference
67th Annual Conference: Interventions: Communication Research and Practice. International Communication Association, San Diego, USA, 25-29 of Maj 2017
Available from: 2017-07-22 Created: 2017-07-22 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Uppal, C. (2016). Claiming Their Heritage: Citizens  and Digital Communication. In: : . Paper presented at Pre-conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), June 8,Tokyo, Japan..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Claiming Their Heritage: Citizens  and Digital Communication
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45836 (URN)
Conference
Pre-conference of the International Communication Association (ICA), June 8,Tokyo, Japan.
Available from: 2016-09-10 Created: 2016-09-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Ranjan, A. & Uppal, C. (2016). Communicating a Relationship: Pakistan Through the lens of Hindi Cinema. In: Communicating with Power: 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016. Paper presented at Communicating with Power - ICA Fukuoka 2016 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicating a Relationship: Pakistan Through the lens of Hindi Cinema
2016 (English)In: Communicating with Power: 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45835 (URN)
Conference
Communicating with Power - ICA Fukuoka 2016 66th Annual International Communication Association Conference, Japan, Fukuoka, June 9-13, 2016
Available from: 2016-09-10 Created: 2016-09-10 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0009-2972

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