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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Koivisto, J. (2018). Navigating in the Midst of Uncertainties: Challenges in Disaster Risk Governance in Mozambique. (Doctoral dissertation). Karlstad: Karlstads universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Navigating in the Midst of Uncertainties: Challenges in Disaster Risk Governance in Mozambique
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Disasters cause heavy losses for societies and may quickly erode any development efforts. Consequently, disaster risk reduction (DRR) is an integral part of development work that should be addressed at multiple levels. Global DRR frameworks, scholars and practitioners all advocate disaster risk governance (DRG) strategies that are multi-stakeholder, polycentric and multisectoral. While various substantive knowledge gaps and questions arising from multiple risks and the crosscutting nature of DRR have been relatively well addressed, uncertainties relating to multiple DRR actors operating and collaborating at different scales have gained less attention in previous studies.

This thesis investigates the uncertainties in DRG in Mozambique, a low-income country that regularly faces natural hazards. These hazards often cause heavy loss of life and livelihoods and economic damage. The four articles that together constitute this thesis focus on different sets of uncertainties and factors that have constrained or allowed Mozambique to take major steps in this policy area. By exploring strategic and institutional uncertainties related to stakeholder involvement, coordination and policy disputes, this thesis reveals different challenges and opportunities that affect DRR policymaking in Mozambique.

This thesis concludes that Mozambique has managed to take important steps in DRR. However, as a consequence of the different challenges to DRR practice in Mozambique, policymaking can be short-sighted and makes slow progress, thus increasing the disconnect between theory, policies and practice. This thesis thus argues that DRG research and practice need to better take into account power-relations; coordination and capacity issues; and responsibilities and transparency across scales, both in Mozambique and elsewhere.

Abstract [en]

Global disaster risk reduction (DRR) frameworks, scholars and practitioners advocate multi-stakeholder, polycentric and multisectoral strategies for disaster risk governance (DRG). However, previous studies have not adequately addressed uncertainties relating to multiple DRR actors operating and collaborating at different scales. This thesis investigates the uncertainties in DRG in Mozambique, a low-income country that regularly faces natural hazards that often cause heavy loss of life and livelihoods and economic damage. The four articles that together constitute this thesis focus on different sets of uncertainties and factors that have constrained or allowed Mozambique to take major steps in this policy area. By exploring uncertainties related to stakeholder involvement, coordination and policy disputes, this thesis reveals different challenges and opportunities that affect DRR policymaking in Mozambique. This thesis concludes that Mozambique has managed to take important steps in DRR. However, as a consequence of the different challenges to DRR practice in Mozambique, policymaking can be short-sighted and makes slow progress, thus increasing the disconnect between theory, policies and practice. It thus calls for increased attention to be paid to DRG in Mozambique and elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2018. p. 83
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2018:39
Keywords
disaster risk governance, Mozambique, disaster risk reduction
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69145 (URN)978-91-7063-875-6 (ISBN)978-91-7063-970-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-10-26, Nyquistsalen, 9C 203, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-09-09 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Christenson, N., Koivisto, J., Persson, E., Hindersson, E., Gustafsson, K. & Pettersson, A. (2018). Riskville – A game for learning about disaster risks and urban planning. International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, 36(3), 238-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Riskville – A game for learning about disaster risks and urban planning
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, ISSN 0280-7270, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Education plays a key role in disaster risk reduction (DRR) and in creating resilient societies worldwide by disseminating information about risks and in improving people’s risk awareness. This, in turn, helps them to prepare, cope with and recover from possible disaster events, hence making the societies more resilient. This paper shortly presents the theoretical background and the rules of the game Riskville where the participants get to experience in a hands-on manner the connections and conflicts between urban planning, different interests and climate related risks. We conclude that Riskville promotes discussions on different perspectives on disaster risk and resilience and approaches in including them into urban planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Colorado Springs, CO: International Research Committee on Sociology of Disasters; International Sociological Association, 2018
Keywords
Risk, urban planning, higher education, disaster risk reduction, resilience
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71825 (URN)
Available from: 2019-04-12 Created: 2019-04-12 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Koivisto, J. & Nohrstedt, D. (2017). A policymaking perspective on disaster risk reduction in Mozambique. Environmental hazards, 16(3), 210-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A policymaking perspective on disaster risk reduction in Mozambique
2017 (English)In: Environmental hazards, ISSN 1464-2867, E-ISSN 1878-5697, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 210-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Academics and practitioners alike emphasise that public policy plays a key role to support efforts to reduce disaster risks and to buffer the impacts of natural hazards when they occur. This involves developing public policies to promote disaster risk reduction (DRR). However, the public policy dimension has only recently begun to receive attention in empirical research on DRR. Processes of policy change are discussed, yet less often studied, and more empirical research is needed to advance the understanding of the conditions for DRR policy change. Combining insights from adaptation research and public policy theory, this study investigates the long-term development of DRR policy in Mozambique as perceived by multiple stakeholders. The study identifies barriers and enabling factors influencing the DRR policy process over time. Using data from 37 semi-structured interviews, the study finds six main enabling factors supporting DRR policy change. Among the most important enabling factors are past disasters and broad stakeholder involvement. The study also unveils several barriers to DRR policy change, including resource insufficiency and lack of coordination among stakeholders. The study concludes with suggestions for integrating DRR and policy process research and lessons for policymaking in support of DRR over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63591 (URN)10.1080/17477891.2016.1218820 (DOI)
Projects
CNDS
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-12 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Koivisto, J. (2014). A Stakeholder Analysis of the Disaster Risk Reduction Policy Subsystem in Mozambique. Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, 5(1), 38-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Stakeholder Analysis of the Disaster Risk Reduction Policy Subsystem in Mozambique
2014 (English)In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, E-ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 38-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of climate related hazards inmany countries. Due to this, disaster risk reduction (DRR) policy has gained a lot of attention inrecent years. DRR policies address complex problems that require inputs from a variety ofstakeholders and hence a multi-stakeholder approach has been advocated widely. However, thepractice of DRR policymaking is challenging and therefore new tools are needed to better understandthe political context of DRR policymaking. This article utilizes an Advocacy Coalition Framework(ACF) approach to describe the political context of the DRR policy subsystem in Mozambique.Through a stakeholder analysis, the article seeks to empirically define subsystem boundaries and toidentify belief systems and key actors therein. The results indicate that the actors can be divided intotwo advocacy coalitions, formed around extant approaches to DRR: disaster management anddevelopment. The article concludes with reflections on the applicability of an ACF approach tostakeholder analysis and as a tool for understanding policy disputes and coordination challenges incomplex settings, such as DRR governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
Keywords
risk policy and management, disaster risk reduction, advocacy coalition framework, stakeholder analysis, Mozambique
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33723 (URN)10.1002/rhc3.12048 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-09-17 Created: 2014-09-17 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Koivisto, J. (2014). Disasters as drivers for policy changes in the context of recurrent hazards?: The case of disaster risk management in Mozambique. Paper presented at 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference: Integrative Risk Management - The Role of Science, Technology and Practice, IDRC Davos 2014 ; Conference Date: 24 August 2014 Through 28 August 2014. Proceedings of the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference: Integrative Risk Management - The Role of Science, Technology and Practice, IDRC Davos 2014, 384-387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disasters as drivers for policy changes in the context of recurrent hazards?: The case of disaster risk management in Mozambique
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 5th International Disaster and Risk Conference: Integrative Risk Management - The Role of Science, Technology and Practice, IDRC Davos 2014, p. 384-387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The development of disaster risk management (DRM) policies has gained attention in recent years but the processes leading to changes in DRM policies is still rather under-researched topic. One country where DRM has gained momentum over the last few years is Mozambique where recurrent natural disasters negatively impacts on the country’s development efforts. Drawing on policy process literature this paper scrutinises the DRM policy changes in Mozambique and the role of disasters in this process. The data for this qualitative case study was collected in early 2013 in Maputo, Mozambique mainly by interviewing a number of actors actively participating in DRM policy process. The results reveal that while disasters can play a role policy process, they alone do not explain any policy changes. While international agreements and cooperation where seen as the main drivers for change, disasters have made incremental changes possible by serving as "wake-up calls", through lessons learned and by keeping the issue high in agenda. The short return period of natural disasters directs focus and resources on disaster response and recovery, thereby overshadowing DRM, although its importance is well acknowledged in the country. The findings suggest that the Post 2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction could be a useful tool for Mozambique, in particular if it provides platforms for information exchange between the countries.

Keywords
Risk management, Disaster risk reductions; Driver; Mozambique; Natural disasters; Policy changes, Disasters
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-43227 (URN)2-s2.0-84924970636 (Scopus ID)
Conference
5th International Disaster and Risk Conference: Integrative Risk Management - The Role of Science, Technology and Practice, IDRC Davos 2014 ; Conference Date: 24 August 2014 Through 28 August 2014
Available from: 2016-06-15 Created: 2016-06-15 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Koivisto, J. Round and Round We Go: the effects of staff turnover on disaster risk governance.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Round and Round We Go: the effects of staff turnover on disaster risk governance
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69141 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-09 Created: 2018-09-09 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Koivisto, J.Whose Voice Do We Hear?: Obstacles to multi-stakeholder and multi-level disaster risk governance in Mozambique.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whose Voice Do We Hear?: Obstacles to multi-stakeholder and multi-level disaster risk governance in Mozambique
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69143 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-09 Created: 2018-09-09 Last updated: 2018-10-02Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5514-8374

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