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Eriksson, Lars
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Eriksson, L. (2019). Age, cognitive load, and multimodal effects on driver response to directional warning. Applied Ergonomics, 76, 147-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age, cognitive load, and multimodal effects on driver response to directional warning
2019 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 76, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inattention can be considered a primary cause of vehicular accidents or crashes, and in-car warning signals are applied to alert the driver to take action even in automated vehicles. Because of age related decline of the older driver's abilities, in-car warning signals may need adjustment to the older driver. We therefore investigated the effects of uni-, bi- and trimodal directional warnings (i.e., light, sound, vibration) on young and older drivers' responses in a driving simulator. A young group of 15 drivers (20-25 years of age) and an older group of 16 drivers (65-79 years of age) participated. In the simulations, warning signal was presented at the left, the center, or the right in front of the participant. With a warning at the left, the center, and the right the correct response was to steer to the right, brake, and steer to the left, respectively. The main results showed the older drivers' responses were slower for each type of warning compared with the young drivers' responses. Overall, the responses were slower with an added cognitively loading task. The only multimodal type of warning inducing overall faster response than its constituent warning types was the vibration-sound, and only for the older drivers. Additionally, with the groups' responses collapsed, such a true multimodal effect on response time also showed for the center vibration-sound warning (i.e., braking response). The only multimodal warning showing clear reduction in response errors compared with its constituent warning types was the vibration-sound for the older drivers during extra cognitive load. The main conclusion is that older drivers can benefit from bimodal warning, as compared with unimodal, in terms of faster and more accurate response. The potential superiority of trimodal warning is nevertheless argued.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Multimodal, Multisensory, Bimodal, Trimodal, In-car warning
National Category
Psychology Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71231 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2019.01.002 (DOI)000457665400014 ()30642519 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-02-22Bibliographically approved
Lidestam, B., Eriksson, L. & Eriksson, O. (2019). Speed perception affected by field of view: Energy-based versus rhythm-based processing. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 65, 227-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speed perception affected by field of view: Energy-based versus rhythm-based processing
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 65, p. 227-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two experiments were carried out to test speed perception dependency on field of view (FoV), virtual road markings (VRMs), and presentation orders. The primary purpose was to examine how the extent of the optic flow (foremost peripherally–vertically) informs the driver about egospeed. A second purpose was to examine different task demands and stimulus characteristics supporting rhythm-based versus energy-based processing. A third purpose was to examine speed changes indicative of changes in motion sensitivity. Participants were tested in a car simulator, with FoV resembling low front-door windows, and with VRMs inside the car. Three main results were found. Larger FoV, both horizontally and peripherally–vertically, significantly reduced participants' speed, as did VRMs. Delineator posts and road center lines were used for participants' rhythm-based processing, when the task was to drive at target speeds. Rich motion-flow cues presented initially resulted in lower egospeed in subsequent conditions with relatively less motion-flow cues. The practical implication is that non-iconic, naturalistic and intuitive interfaces can effectively instill spontaneous speed adaptation in drivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Egospeed, Field of view, Optic flow, Speed perception, Velocity estimation, Optical flows, Road and street markings, Roads and streets, Car simulator, Field of views, Intuitive interfaces, Speed change, Target speed, Speed
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75691 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.07.016 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070488276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2020-01-17Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, S., Eriksson, L. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 19, 204-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle
2018 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 19, p. 204-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cognitive intervention programme 'New Challenges' targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle was evaluated in a pilot study. The participants were divided into a cognitive treatment group (n = 32) and a control group (n = 11). In the control group, six participants had no treatment and five participated in 12-step treatment. The participants were measured pre and post using the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS), the abridged version of sense of coherence (SOC), Positive and Negative Affect Scale, and Bergström's quality of programme delivery (QPD). The results of the treatment group showed that criminal thinking patterns dropped significantly from high values to close to normal level. SOC and positive affect increased significantly in the treatment group. Both SOC and positive affect showed positive correlation with QPD. Regarding the possible influence of the 12-step treatment, there was no difference in the control group between participants receiving 12-step treatment and those not receiving treatment. The main conclusion is that the cognitive treatment programme 'New Challenges' can contribute to reduced criminal thinking and increased SOC and positive affect, which may prove to be important precursors of reduced criminality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Criminality, crime prevention, PICTS, SOC, PANAS, client satisfaction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67398 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2018.1513202 (DOI)
Note

Ingick i licentiatuppsatsen som manuskript med titeln: Evaluation of the Swedish Cognitive Intervention Programme "New Challenges" Targeting Adult Men with a Criminal Lifestyle

Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, S., Eriksson, L. & Hiltunen, A. (2017). Evaluation of the Cognitive Intervention Programme "A New Direction" Targeting Young Offenders in Sweden. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 18(2), 176-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the Cognitive Intervention Programme "A New Direction" Targeting Young Offenders in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, ISSN 1404-3858, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 176-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Criminality, thinking patterns, sense of coherence, PICTS, SOC-13, cognitive intervention
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48171 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2017.1307545 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-17 Created: 2017-03-17 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L. & Lundqvist, L.-M. (2015). Age and cognitive load effects on response to multisensory warning in simulated driving. In: : . Paper presented at The 6th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, 4th International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age and cognitive load effects on response to multisensory warning in simulated driving
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38152 (URN)
Conference
The 6th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics, 4th International Conference on Human Factors in Transportation
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-08-15Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G., Patten, C., Svenson, O. & Eriksson, L. (2015). Estimated time of arrival and debiasing the time saving bias. Ergonomics (12), 1939-1946
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimated time of arrival and debiasing the time saving bias
2015 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, no 12, p. 1939-1946Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

The time saving bias predicts that the time saved when increasing speed from a high speed is overestimated, and underestimated when increasing speed from a slow speed. In a questionnaire, time saving judgements were investigated when information of estimated time to arrival was provided. In an active driving task, an alternative meter indicating the inverted speed was used to debias judgements. The simulated task was to first drive a distance at a given speed, and then drive the same distance again at the speed the driver judged was required to gain exactly 3 min in travel time compared with the first drive. A control group performed the same task with a speedometer and saved less than the targeted 3 min when increasing speed from a high speed, and more than 3 min when increasing from a low speed. Participants in the alternative meter condition were closer to the target. The two studies corroborate a time saving bias and show that biased intuitive judgements can be debiased by displaying the inverted speed.

Practitioner Summary: Previous studies have shown a cognitive bias in judgements of the time saved by increasing speed. This simulator study aims to improve driver judgements by introducing a speedometer indicating the inverted speed in active driving. The results show that the bias can be reduced by presenting the inverted speed and this finding can be used when designing in-car information systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
time saving bias, debiasing, inverted speed, estimated time of arrival, heuristic
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38149 (URN)10.1080/00140139.2015.1051592 (DOI)000367014100002 ()26230872 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Palmqvist, L., Andersson Hultgren, J., Blissing, B. & Nordin, S. (2015). Performance and presence with head-movement produced motion parallax in simulated driving. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 34, 54-64
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance and presence with head-movement produced motion parallax in simulated driving
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 34, p. 54-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Driving simulator studies can reveal relevant and valid aspects of driving behavior, but underestimation of distance and speed can negatively affect the driver’s performance, such as in performance of overtaking. One possible explanation for the underestimation of distance and speed is that two-dimensional projection of the visual scene disrupts the monocular-based illusory depth because of conflicting binocular and monocular information of depth. A possible solution might involve the strengthening of the monocular information so that the binocular information becomes less potent. In the present study, we used an advanced high-fidelity driving simulator to investigate whether adding the visual depth information of motion parallax from head movement affects sense of presence, judgment of distance and speed, and performance measures coupled with overtaking. The simulations included two types of driving scenario in which one was urban and the other was rural. The main results show no effect of this head-movement produced motion parallax on sense of presence, head movement, time to collision, distance judgment, or speed judgment. However, the results show an effect on lateral positioning. When initiating the overtaking maneuver there is a lateral positioning farther away from the road center as effect of the motion parallax in both types of scenario, which can be interpreted as indicating use of naturally occurring information that change behavior at overtaking. Nevertheless, only showing tendencies of effects, absent is any clear additional impact of this motion parallax in the simulated driving.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38150 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2015.07.013 (DOI)000362917500005 ()
Available from: 2015-10-09 Created: 2015-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G., Svenson, O. & Eriksson, L. (2013). The time-saving bias in static-cognitive and dynamic-driving judgements. In: U. Ansorge, E. Kircher, C. Lamm & H. Leder (Ed.), : . Paper presented at The 55th Tagung Experimentelle Psychologen Conference (TeaP) 24-27 Mars Wien Österrike (pp. 73).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The time-saving bias in static-cognitive and dynamic-driving judgements
2013 (English)In: / [ed] U. Ansorge, E. Kircher, C. Lamm & H. Leder, 2013, p. 73-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-28870 (URN)
Conference
The 55th Tagung Experimentelle Psychologen Conference (TeaP) 24-27 Mars Wien Österrike
Available from: 2013-09-04 Created: 2013-09-04 Last updated: 2013-12-04Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, G., Svenson, O. & Eriksson, L. (2013). The time-saving bias: Judgements, cognition and perception. Judgment and decision making, 8(4), 492-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The time-saving bias: Judgements, cognition and perception
2013 (English)In: Judgment and decision making, ISSN 1930-2975, E-ISSN 1930-2975, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 492-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biases in people's judgments of time saved by increasing the speed of an activity have been studied mainly with hypothetical scenarios (Svenson, 2008). The present study asked whether the classic time-saving bias persists as a perceptual bias when we control the speed of an activity and assess the perceived time elapsed at different speeds. Specifically, we investigated the time-saving bias in a driving simulator. Each participant was asked to first drive a distance at a given speed and then drive the same distance again at the speed she or he judged necessary to gain exactly three minutes in travel time compared to the first trip. We found that that the time-saving bias applies to active driving and that it affects the choice of driving speed. The drivers' time-saving judgements show that the perception of the time elapsed while driving does not eliminate the time-saving bias.

Keywords
time-saving bias, driving task, time perception, speed choice, time gain, mean speed
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38606 (URN)000322988500008 ()
Available from: 2015-11-30 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Oskarsson, P.-A., Eriksson, L. & Carlander, O. (2012). Enhanced perception and performance by multimodal threat cueing in simulated combat vehicle. Human Factors, 54(1), 121-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced perception and performance by multimodal threat cueing in simulated combat vehicle
2012 (English)In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 121-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective:In a simulated combat vehicle, uni-, bi-, and trimodal cueing of direction to threat were compared with the purpose to investigate whether multisensory redundant information may enhance dynamic perception and performance.                 

Background: Previous research has shown that multimodal display presentation can enhance perception of information and task performance.                 

Method: Two experiments in a simulated combat vehicle were performed under the instructions to turn the vehicle toward the threat as fast and accurately as possible after threat cue onset. In Experiment 1, direction to threat was presented by four display types: visual head-down display, tactile belt, 3-D audio, and trimodal with the three displays combined. In Experiment 2, direction to threat was presented by three display types: visual head-up display (HUD)–3-D audio, tactile belt–3-D audio, and trimodal with HUD, tactile belt, and 3-D audio combined.                 

Results: In Experiment 1, the trimodal display provided overall best performance and perception of threat direction. In Experiment 2, both the trimodal and HUD–3-D audio displays led to overall best performance, and the trimodal display provided overall the best perception of threat direction. None of the trimodal displays induced higher mental workload or secondary task interference.                 

Conclusion: The trimodal displays provided overall enhanced perception and performance in the dynamically framed threat scenario and did not entail higher mental workload or decreased spare capacity.                 

Application: Trimodal displays with redundant information may contribute to safer and more reliable peak performance in time-critical dynamic tasks and especially in more extreme and stressful situations with high perceptual or mental workload.                 

 

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-28862 (URN)10.1177/0018720811424895 (DOI)000299292200010 ()
Available from: 2013-09-03 Created: 2013-09-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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