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Borglin, Gunilla
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Forss, K. S., Persson, K. & Borglin, G. (2019). Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review. Nurse Education in Practice, 37, 97-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review
2019 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about nursing students' experiences of caring for patients from diverse cultures, which is an important factor in educational settings when it comes to understanding whether the teaching strategies applied are successful. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature, thereby synthesising existing studies to explore nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with different cultural backgrounds from theirs. A systematic article search was done in PubMed, CINAHL and ERIC. A total of 996 studies were found in the searches and finally seven studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. The analysis of the seven included studies was interpreted to represent two overarching themes, namely the challenge of communication and non-mutual language and the challenge of culture and culturally influenced behaviour, representing nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with a different cultural background from theirs. A major challenge for nursing educators appears to be creating pedagogical interventions that cultivate a humble, solicitous and caring curiosity among students, such that they do not perceive only challenges in caring for culturally diverse patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Care; Cultural diversity; Experiences; Nursing students; Patients; Scoping review
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76401 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2019.05.003 (DOI)000473840000014 ()31129531 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Borglin, G., Thach, E. H., Jeppsson, M. & Forss, K. S. (2019). Registered nurse's experiences of continence care for older people: A qualitative descriptive study. International Journal of Older People Nursing, Article ID e12275.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurse's experiences of continence care for older people: A qualitative descriptive study
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, article id e12275Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim This study aimed to illuminate nurses' experience of continence care for older people receiving home care, either in their own home or in an assisted living facility. Background Registered Nurses (RNs) have a major role to play in identifying and establishing appropriate actions regarding continence care for older people. However, the crucial nursing care pathway for continence care is commonly described as poor. Methods Interviews were conducted with 11 RNs providing home care, and the transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Result The impressions of RNs were categorised according to four themes: perceptions of continence care, an open approach to continence care, the need for personalised aid fittings and the importance of teamwork in continence care. Key findings were the importance of teamwork; the need for nurses to embrace leadership at the point of care and be more visible in terms of the provision of direct care; substantiation that evidence-based interventions, such as scheduled toileting and prompted voiding, should constitute the norm in continence care within the context of home care; and the need for nurses to support the right of older persons to receive an assessment of their continence problems, deemed to be the minimum standard of quality care. Conclusion The provision of continence care that is based on key nursing standards, such as evidence-based and person-centred care, as well as individualised continence care that is based on evidenced-based guidelines, would ensure an improvement in the continence care that is presently on offer to older people. Implications for practice Nurses need to embrace leadership at the point of care and to be more visible with the provision of direct care in order to improve continence care for older people receiving home care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
content analysis; home care; nursing; qualitative design; urinary incontinence
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76399 (URN)10.1111/opn.12275 (DOI)000488401500001 ()31577389 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Borglin, G., Rathel, K., Paulsson, H. & Forss, K. S. (2019). Registered nurses experiences of managing depressive symptoms at care centres for older people: a qualitative descriptive study. BMC Nursing, 18(1), Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurses experiences of managing depressive symptoms at care centres for older people: a qualitative descriptive study
2019 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Depressive symptoms and/or depression are commonly experienced by older people. Both are underdiagnosed, undertreated and regularly overlooked by healthcare professionals. Healthcare facilities for people aged >= 75 years have been in place in Sweden since 2015. The aim of these care centres, which are managed by registered nurses (RNs), is to offer care adjusted to cater to the complex needs and health problems of older people. Although the mental health of older people is prioritised in these centres, research into the experience of RNs of depressive symptoms and/or depression in older people in this setting is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to illuminate RNs, working at care centres for older people, experience of identifying and intervening in cases of depressive symptoms. Methods The data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected through interviews (n = 10) with RNs working at 10 care centres for older people in southern Sweden. The transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results The participants' experiences could be understood from four predominant themes: (1) challenging to identify, (2) described interventions, (3) prerequisites for identification, and (4) contextual influences. Key findings were that it was difficult to identify depression as it often manifested as physical symptoms; evidence-based nursing interventions were generally not the first-line treatment used; trust, continuity and the ability of RNs to think laterally; and the context influenced the ability of RNs to manage older people's depressive symptoms and/or depression. Conclusions The process of identifying depressive symptoms and performing an appropriate intervention was found to be complex, especially as older people were reluctant to present at the centres and provided obscure reasons for doing so. A nurse-patient relationship that was built on trust and was characterised by continuity of care was identified as a necessary prerequisite. Appropriate nursing interventions-afforded the same status as pharmacological treatment-are warranted as the first-line treatment of depression. Further research is also needed into efficacious nursing interventions targeting depressive symptoms and/or depression.

Keywords
Content analysis; Care centres for older people; Nursing; Qualitative research; Registered nurses
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76400 (URN)10.1186/s12912-019-0368-5 (DOI)000484622800001 ()31516384 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Richards, D. A. & Borglin, G. (2019). 'Shitty nursing' - The new normal?. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 91, 148-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Shitty nursing' - The new normal?
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 91, p. 148-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we ask our profession to consider whether something is rotten at the core of modern nursing. We will use our own experiences as patients, together with published literature, to ask questions of our profession in perpetrating what one of our colleagues recently, and with great embarrassment, referred to as 'shitty nursing'. Our intention is most certainly not to offend any readers, for this term has been used in literature for more than one hundred years to describe bad situations, including those where events or people's behaviour are of a low standard. Our intention instead, is to challenge ourselves, the profession and you the reader by raising a measured debate which seems at present to be missing within the profession. We examine the potential idea that poor nursing care may not be the exception, but horrifyingly, may be the new normal. We are particularly concerned that patients' fundamental care needs may be falling into an ever widening gap between assistant and registered nurses. Whilst we acknowledge the potential causes of poor nursing care, causes that are often cited by nurses themselves, we come to the conclusion that a mature profession including clinicians, educators, administrators, researchers and regulators cannot continually blame contextual factors for its failings. A mature profession with an intact contract between itself and society must shoulder some of the responsibility for its own problems. We do suggest a way forward, including a mix of reconciliation, refocus and research, underpinned by what we argue is a much needed dose of professional humility. Readers may take us to task for potentially overstating the problem, ignoring non-nursing drivers, and downplaying other significant factors. You may think that there is much in nursing to glory in. However, we make no apology for presenting our views. Our lived experiences tell us something different. As professional nurses our main aim is to ensure that our adverse experiences as patients are statistical anomalies, and our future encounters with nursing care represent all that we know to be excellent in our profession. We leave you to judge and comment. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords
Nursing care; Fundamental care; Quality; Patient experience
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76402 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.12.018 (DOI)000466616700020 ()30831477 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Appelgren, M., Bahtsevani, C., Persson, K. & Borglin, G. (2018). Nurses' experiences of caring for patients with intellectual developmental disorders: a systematic review using a meta-ethnographic approach. BMC Nursing, 17, Article ID 51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' experiences of caring for patients with intellectual developmental disorders: a systematic review using a meta-ethnographic approach
2018 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundResearch suggests that registered nurses (RNs) do not feel adequately prepared to support patients with intellectual disability disorder (IDD). This is unsurprising, as few European health sciences curricula include undergraduate and graduate training courses in IDD. As RNs are often in the front line of care, eliciting in-depth knowledge about how they experience nursing this group of patients is vital. Our aim in this study was to develop a conceptual understanding about RNs' experiences of nursing patients with IDD.MethodWe undertook a systematic review and meta-ethnography to synthesise qualitative research studies found in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC databases and by manual searching to identify additional studies. We condensed translatable second-order constructs, and developed an idiomatic translation. Finally, we formulated line of argument (LOA) syntheses to capture the core of the idiomatic translations.ResultsWe included eighteen published studies from eight countries involving 190 RNs. The RNs' experience of nursing patients with IDD were reflected in 14 LOAs. Six of these reflected a tentatively more distinctive and at times unique conceptualisation of RNs' experience of nursing this group of patients. The remaining eight LOAs represented a conceptualisation of nursing per se, a conceptualisation of nursing that was interpreted as a universal experience regardless of context and patient group.ConclusionLack of awareness and knowledge are likely breeding grounds for the otherness' that still surrounds this group of patients. In encounters between patients and RNs, focusing on the person behind the disability label could be one way to secure relevant nursing care for patients with IDD. Undertaking appropriate under- and postgraduate education alongside the implementation of nursing models focusing on patient-centred care would help RNs in reducing the health and care inequalities this group of patients still face.Trial registrationPROSPERO 2017: CRD42017077703.

Keywords
Care; Idiomatic translations; Intellectual disability disorder; Line of argument synthesis; Qualitative research; Qualitative synthesis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76403 (URN)10.1186/s12912-018-0316-9 (DOI)000451843600001 ()30524202 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Wong, A. Y. L., Forss, K. S., Jakobsson, J., Schoeb, V., Kumlien, C. & Borglin, G. (2018). Older adult's experience of chronic low back pain and its implications on their daily life: Study protocol of a systematic review of qualitative research. Systematic Reviews, 7, Article ID 81.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older adult's experience of chronic low back pain and its implications on their daily life: Study protocol of a systematic review of qualitative research
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Systematic Reviews, E-ISSN 2046-4053, Vol. 7, article id 81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Of various chronic diseases, low back pain (LBP) is the most common and debilitating musculoskeletal condition among older adults aged 65 years or older. While more than 17 million older adults in the USA suffer from at least one episode of LBP annually, approximately six million of them experience chronic LBP that significantly affects their quality of life and physical function. Since many older adults with chronic LBP may also have comorbidities and are more sensitive to pain than younger counterparts, these older individuals may face unique age-related physical and psychosocial problems. While some qualitative research studies have investigated the life experiences of older adults with chronic LBP, no systematic review has integrated and synthesized the scientific knowledge regarding the influence of chronic LBP on the physical, psychological, and social aspects of lives in older adults. Without such information, it may result in unmet care needs and ineffective interventions for this vulnerable group. Therefore, the objective of this systematic review is to synthesize knowledge regarding older adults' experiences of living with chronic LBP and the implications on their daily lives. Methods/design: Candidate publications will be sought from databases: PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Qualitative research studies will be included if they are related to the experiences of older adults with chronic LBP. Two independent reviewers will screen the titles, abstracts, and full-text articles for eligibility. The reference lists of the included studies will be checked for additional relevant studies. Forward citation tracking will be conducted. Meta-ethnography will be chosen to synthesize the data from the included studies. Specifically, the second-order concepts that are deemed to be translatable by two independent reviewers will be included and synthesized to capture the core of the idiomatic translations (i.e., a translation focusing on salient categories of meaning rather than the literal translation of words or phrases). Discussion: This systematic review of qualitative evidence will enable researchers to identify potential unmet care needs, as well as to facilitate the development of effective, appropriate, person-centered health care interventions targeting this group of individuals.

Keywords
Health service research; Meta-ethnography; Meta-synthesis; Qualitative studies; Older adults; Chronic low back pain
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76405 (URN)10.1186/s13643-018-0742-5 (DOI)000450898700002 ()29793522 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Forss, K. S., Nilsson, J. & Borglin, G. (2018). Registered nurses' and older people's experiences of participation in nutritional care in nursing homes: a descriptive qualitative study. BMC Nursing, 17, Article ID 19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurses' and older people's experiences of participation in nutritional care in nursing homes: a descriptive qualitative study
2018 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 17, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The evaluation and treatment of older people's nutritional care is generally viewed as a low priority by nurses. However, given that eating and drinking are fundamental human activities, the support and enhancement of an optimal nutritional status should be regarded as a vital part of nursing. Registered nurses must therefore be viewed as having an important role in assessing and evaluating the nutritional needs of older people as well as the ability to intervene in cases of malnutrition. This study aimed to illuminate the experience of participating in nutritional care from the perspectives of older people and registered nurses. A further aim is to illuminate the latter's experience of nutritional care per se. Methods: A qualitative, descriptive design was adopted. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with eight registered nurses and four older persons (mean age 85.7 years) in a city in the southern part of Sweden. The subsequent analysis was conducted by content analysis. Result The analysis reflected three themes: 'participation in nutritional care equals information', 'nutritional care out of remit and competence' and 'nutritional care more than just choosing a flavour'. They were interpreted to illuminate the experience of participation in nutritional care from the perspective of older people and RNs, and the latter's experience of nutritional care in particular per se. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a paternalistic attitude in care as well as asymmetry in the nurse-patient relationship are still common characteristics of modern clinical nursing practice for older people. Considering that participation should be central to nursing care, and despite the RN's awareness of the importance of involving the older persons in their nutritional care this was not reflected in reality. Strategies to involve older persons in their nutritional care in a nursing home context need to take into account that for this population participation might not always be experienced as an important part of nursing care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Care; Content analysis; Interviews; Malnutrition; Nursing interventions; Older people; Patient involvement; Registered nurse
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76406 (URN)10.1186/s12912-018-0289-8 (DOI)000432251500001 ()29760582 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Richards, D. A., Hanssen, T. A. & Borglin, G. (2018). The Second Triennial Systematic Literature Review of European Nursing Research: Impact on Patient Outcomes and Implications for Evidence-Based Practice. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 15(5), 333-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Second Triennial Systematic Literature Review of European Nursing Research: Impact on Patient Outcomes and Implications for Evidence-Based Practice
2018 (English)In: Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, ISSN 1545-102X, E-ISSN 1741-6787, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 333-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: European research in nursing has been criticized as overwhelmingly descriptive, wasteful and with little relevance to clinical practice. This second triennial review follows our previous review of articles published in 2010, to determine whether the situation has changed.Objective: To identify, appraise, and synthesize reports of European nursing research published during 2013 in the top 20 nursing research journals.Methods: Systematic review with descriptive results synthesis.Results: We identified 2,220 reports, of which 254, from 19 European countries, were eligible for analysis; 215 (84.7%) were primary research, 36 (14.2%) secondary research, and three (1.2%) mixed primary and secondary. Forty-eight (18.9%) of studies were experimental: 24 (9.4%) randomized controlled trials, 11 (4.3%) experiments without randomization, and 13 (5.1%) experiments without control group. A total of 106 (41.7%) articles were observational: 85 (33.5%) qualitative research. The majority (158; 62.2%) were from outpatient and secondary care hospital settings. One hundred and sixty-five (65.0%) articles reported nursing intervention studies: 77 (30.3%) independent interventions, 77 (30.3%) interdependent, and 11 (4.3%) dependent. This represents a slight increase in experimental studies compared with our previous review (18.9% vs. 11.7%). The quality of reporting remained very poor.Linking Evidence to Action: European research in nursing remains overwhelmingly descriptive. We call on nursing researchers globally to raise the level of evidence and, therefore, the quality of care and patient outcomes. We urge them to replicate our study in their regions, diagnose reasons for the lack of appropriate research, identify solutions, and implement a deliberate, targeted, and systematic global effort to increase the number of experimental, high quality, and relevant studies into nursing interventions. We also call on journal editors to mandate an improvement in the standards of research reporting in nursing journals

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
evidence-based practice; nurse-midwifery; research methods; systematic review; health care reform; international health
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76404 (URN)10.1111/wvn.12320 (DOI)000446672700002 ()30129094 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
Sandstrom, B., Willman, A., Svensson, B. & Borglin, G. (2015). Perceptions of national guidelines and their (non) implementation in mental healthcare: a deductive and inductive content analysis. Implementation Science, 10, Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of national guidelines and their (non) implementation in mental healthcare: a deductive and inductive content analysis
2015 (English)In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 10, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: National guidelines are being produced at an increasing rate, and politicians and managers are expected to promote these guidelines and their implementation in clinical work. However, research seldom deals with how decision-makers can perceive these guidelines or their challenges in a cultural context. Therefore, the aim of this study was twofold: to investigate how well Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) reflected the empirical reality of mental healthcare and to gain an extended understanding of the perceptions of decision-makers operating within this context, in regard to the implementation of evidence-based guidelines. Methods: The study took place in the southeast of Sweden and employed a qualitative design. The data were collected through 23 interviews with politicians and managers working either in the county council or in the municipalities. The transcribed text was analysed iteratively and in two distinct phases, first deductively and second inductively by means of qualitative content analysis. Results: Our deductive analysis showed that the text strongly reflected two out of three categorisation matrices, i.e. evidence and context representing the PARIHS framework. However, the key element of facilitation was poorly mirrored in the text. Results from the inductive analysis can be seen in light of the main category sitting on the fence; thus, the informants' perceptions reflected ambivalence and contradiction. This was illustrated by conflicting views and differences in culture and ideology, a feeling of security in tradition, a certain amount of resistance to change and a lack of role clarity and clear directions. Together, our two analyses provide a rich description of an organisational culture that is highly unlikely to facilitate the implementation of the national guidelines, together with a distrust of the source behind such guidelines, which stands in stark contrast to the high confidence in the knowledge of experienced people in authority within the organisational context. Conclusions: Our findings have highlighted that, regardless of by whom guidelines are released, they are not likely to be utilised or implemented if those who are responsible for implementing them do not trust the source. This aspect (i.e. contextual trust) is not covered by PARIHS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Evidence-based practice; Guidelines; Implementation; Mental health; Nursing; PARIHS; Qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76411 (URN)10.1186/s13012-015-0234-0 (DOI)000352605700001 ()25888854 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Bohman, D. M., Mattsson, L. & Borglin, G. (2015). Primary healthcare nurses' experiences of physical activity referrals: an interview study. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 16(3), 270-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Primary healthcare nurses' experiences of physical activity referrals: an interview study
2015 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 270-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study is to illuminate primary health care (PHC) nurses' experiences of physical activity referrals (PARs). Background: Despite extensive knowledge about the substantial health effects physical activities can produce, fewer and fewer people in our modern society regularly engage in physical activity. Within health care and, particularly, within the PHC arena, nurses meet people on a daily basis who need help to engage in a healthier lifestyle. The possibility of issuing written prescriptions for physical activities, often referred to as PARs, has been introduced as a tool to support such lifestyles. However, even though PHC nurses can prescribe physical activities, studies investigating their experience in this type of nursing intervention are rare. Methods: For this study, 12 semi-structured interviews were conducted with PHC nurses, and the transcribed texts were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Findings: Two categories - PARs, an important nursing intervention, and PARs, the necessity of organisational support - reflected the nurses' experiences in using PARs. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that viewing the PAR as a complex intervention, with all that this entails, might be one approach to increasing the number of PARs being issued. Simpler systems, more time and the potential for testing the effectiveness of follow-ups could be possible ways of achieving this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
content analysis; interviews; nurse; nursing interventions; qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76410 (URN)10.1017/S1463423614000267 (DOI)000369928500008 ()25075720 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-28Bibliographically approved
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