Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
(2019). Göteborgsregionen och klimatrisker: Klimatanpassning för dåtida och framtida bebyggelse. Karlstad: Karlstads universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Göteborgsregionen och klimatrisker: Klimatanpassning för dåtida och framtida bebyggelse
2019 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Denna rapport är slutrapporten från forskningsprojektet “Minskadeklimatrisker i framtidens bebyggelse och boende lärande från tidigarehändelser och samhällsplanering” som genomförts på Centrum förklimat och säkerhet mellan 2014 – 2018 och finansierats av StiftelsenLänsförsäkringsgruppens Forsknings- och Utvecklingsfond.Projektet har bestått av fem delstudier kring klimatriskhantering ochklimatanpassning i flera olika geografiska kontexter runt om i Sverige.Den studie av Göteborgsregionen som presenteras i denna rapport ärett sätt att skapa en syntes av de olika teoretiska och empiriskaingångarna i detta projekt genom en studie av den aktuellaproblematiken på en specifik plats.

Mikael Granberg som står som redaktör för rapporten är professor istatsvetenskap och föreståndare för Centrum för klimat och säkerhet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2019. p. 129
Series
Centrum för klimat och säkerhet, Rapport ; 2019:1
National Category
Climate Research Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71544 (URN)978-91-7063-884-8 (ISBN)978-91-7063-979-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Di Baldassarre, G., Nohrstedt, D., Mård, J., Burchardt, S., Albin, C., Bondesson, S., . . . Parker, C. F. (2018). An integrative research framework to unravel the interplay of natural hazards and vulnerabilities. Earth's Future, 6(3), 305-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An integrative research framework to unravel the interplay of natural hazards and vulnerabilities
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Disaster risk analysis and assessment, Disaster risk reduction, Flood risk, Natural hazards, Risk, Socio-hydrology, Volcanic hazards and risks, Vulnerability
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66485 (URN)10.1002/2017EF000764 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Glover, L. & Granberg, M. (2018). Climate change adaptation policy and political values. In: : . Paper presented at Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018), arbetsgrupp "Environmental Politics". Malmö University on October 3-5..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change adaptation policy and political values
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research and policy into climate change adaptation responses has expanded from the technological, financial and institutional realms into the social realms. There is a growing interest in, and awareness of, political aspects of adaptation policy and planning. This paper considers three aspects of this development and the broad issue of how contemporary political values influences adaptation responses. Firstly, a case is presented for identifying the political values in climate change adaptation policies, plans and programmes. Secondly, a range of political values and ideologies associated with public sector and NGO climate change adaptation measures are identified from contemporary scholarship. Thirdly, a number of implications of adaptation policy stemming from these political values are identified.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69521 (URN)
Conference
Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018), arbetsgrupp "Environmental Politics". Malmö University on October 3-5.
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-02-26
Moloney, S., Fünfgeld, H. & Granberg, M. (2018). Climate change responses from the global to local scale: an overview (1ed.). In: Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael (Ed.), Local action on climate change: opprtunities and constraints (pp. 1-16). Abingdon & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change responses from the global to local scale: an overview
2018 (English)In: Local action on climate change: opprtunities and constraints / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Climate Change Research
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62676 (URN)978-1-138-68152-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-17481-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Moloney, S., Fünfgeld, H. & Granberg, M. (Eds.). (2018). Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints (1ed.). Abingdon & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018. p. 156 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Climate Change Research
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62674 (URN)978-1-138-68152-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-17481-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Öjehag-Pettersson, A. & Granberg, M. (2018). Local Government and Public Procurement: Organizational Trends and the Rise of New Bureaucrats in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018) Malmö University on October 3-5..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local Government and Public Procurement: Organizational Trends and the Rise of New Bureaucrats in Sweden
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 Swedish local government play a central role in welfare production and in handling environmental issues at large. In addition, they also plan the physical use of land and water areas within its territory. Accordingly, Swedish local government are crucial actors in driving sustainable development. During the last decades reform of local government has been taking place under the umbrella of New Public Management (NPM) following a pattern seen in most parts of the world entailing market inspired logics and values that subsumes political and democratic ambitions and tasks. The political rationalities underpinning NPM continues to exist and are well researched. There are, however, significant gaps. In particular, of studies concerning the politics of public procurement. In this paper we present an analysis where public procurement is understood more broadly, as a governmental technology, an instrument of governing associated with the rationalities of marketization and competition that continues to be more or less unquestioned as virtues in contemporary society. We assume that as such a technology it is not a neutral tool, but rather designed to realize particular understandings of how to govern and with what effects. The case we present is based on interviews with civil servants, consultants and politicians working with public procurement in Swedish local government. With the perceptions of our respondents as a base, we construct a narrative where three themes emerge as important: public procurement expansion; organizational change and centralization, and: the procurer as bureaucrat. We conclude that the importance and scope of public procurement within the larger local government organization has rapidly expanded, public procurement has been centralized and, perhaps most importantly, we witness the emergence of a new bureaucrat representing values not compatible with traditional Weberian understandings.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69522 (URN)
Conference
Statsvetenskapliga förbundets årsmöte, 2018 (SWEPSA 2018) Malmö University on October 3-5.
Projects
Procurement for Sustainable Innovation in the Built Environment (ProcSIBE)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 254-2013-1837
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. (2018). Strong local government moving to the market? The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden (1ed.). In: Luque-Ayala, Andrés, Marvin, Simon och Bulkeley, Harriet (Ed.), Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strong local government moving to the market? The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden
2018 (English)In: Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City / [ed] Luque-Ayala, Andrés, Marvin, Simon och Bulkeley, Harriet, London: Routledge, 2018, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65114 (URN)9781138057401 (ISBN)9781138057357 (ISBN)9781315164779 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-11-05 Created: 2017-11-05 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M. (2018). Strong local government moving to the market?: The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden. In: Andrés Luque-Ayala, Simon Marvin and Harriet Bulkeley (Ed.), Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City (pp. 129-145). Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strong local government moving to the market?: The case of low carbon futures in the city of Örebro, Sweden
2018 (English)In: Rethinking Urban Transitions: Politics in the Low Carbon City / [ed] Andrés Luque-Ayala, Simon Marvin and Harriet Bulkeley, Taylor & Francis, 2018, p. 129-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Policy and practice at the local level is central in relating global standards and knowledge, national and regional climate change scenarios and policy decisions into particular climate action in a specific context (Bulkeley and Betsill, 2003; Elander et al., 2003; Lundqvist and Biel, 2007; Storbjörk, 2007; Storbjörk, 2010; Castán Broto and Bulkeley, 2012; van den Berg and Coenen, 2012; Romero-Lankao, 2012; Bulkeley et al., 2015). This means that cities, and their local governments, are central to understanding the implementation of international agreements (regimes), national and regional climate change policy. It needs to be stressed, however, that local governments are not just implementers of policy decision taken at higher levels of government. Local governments can, and perhaps have to, be forerunners in climate change policy and practice, as the sources and impacts of climate change are always local, national policy and international negotiations are not always successful, and national governments are not necessarily taking the lead (Gore and Robinson, 2009; Bulkeley et al., 2015; Bulkeley and Betsill, 2003). Local government action on climate change takes place in a specific local setting. It also takes place in a policy environment characterized by cross-cutting issues and cross pressure from government actors on international, national and regional levels, unfolding public sector reform, continuous policy development, and demands from businesses and citizens (Granberg et al., 2016). Accordingly, why and how cities act on climate change challenges is by no means a straightforward matter (Bulkeley et al., 2015) but, certainly, one that warrants critical research. This chapter focuses on local government low carbon action within the field of alternative energy production, zooming in on the organizational modes and on intermediary functions and actors in efforts aiming at low carbon transitions (cf. Bulkeley and Betsill, 2013; Hodson et al., 2013). In the Swedish context, low carbon transitions are of course connected to the ecological need to reduce GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions, mitigating future risks and impacts. But they are also increasingly connected to the more economic arguments connected to the concept of a carbon or fossil bubble (Schoenmaker et al., 2015; Rubin, 2015). That is, the idea that any investments made in fossil fuel-based companies are investments that will add to GHC emissions and, perhaps even more important from this perspective, fail to produce any long-term economic profits. According to this perspective, all viable investments need to be directed towards no-carbon solutions, businesses and markets or there will be serious negative economic impacts when the carbon bubble eventually bursts. The central questions of this chapter are how capacity-building for low carbon transitions evolves at the interface between state and market and what specific role local governments take in this interface. As already indicated above, this perspective is guided by the concept of intermediation through institutional experimentation (cf. Luque-Ayala et al., Chapter 2, this volume; also, Hodson and Marvin, 2009, 2012; Hodson et al., 2013). Intermediaries here are defined as entities that connect, translate and facilitate flows between different parties. The focus of the chapter is, more precisely, on systemic intermediation on a network level involving more than two parties (Hodson and Marvin, 2009). The intermediary role can be divided into facilitating, configuring and brokering (Stewart and Hyysalo, 2008). Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to study local government efforts to build low carbon capacity by describing, critically examining and analysing local government climate action. In the case studied here, we can see the local government organization intermediating indirectly by trying to facilitate flows of both experience and capital between public and private actors but also directly as a market actor through a boundary hybrid organization facilitating connections between local government and market actors. A hybrid organization (cf. Koppell, 2006) is an organization that mixes value systems and logics of various spheres such as the state and the market (cf. Erlingsson et al., 2014; Montin, 2016). More precisely, the local government uses a 'green' investment fund, facilitating public-private networking and a municipal company in their efforts to advance a low carbon transition. The case studied follows the development of local government climate change action over the last decade in the Swedish city of Örebro. The city profiles itself as a forerunner in environmental issues and has formulated ambitious reduction targets. Sweden is often considered a pioneer in environmental governance (Lidskog and Elander, 2012), combining high ambitions at a national level, strong local government and robust policy guided by ecological modernization (Lundqvist, 2000; Zannakis, 2015). It has been stated that if Sweden still holds on to a leading international position in environmental governance it is probably due to activities at the local level (Granberg and Elander, 2007; Uggla and Elander, 2009; Hjerpe et al., 2014). Accordingly, Sweden provides an interesting context for studies of local government climate change action via market mechanisms, given its combination of strong local government with high (national and local) environmental ambitions. Arguably, drawing from this, if Sweden is to be perceived as a 'least likely' case for utilizing market mechanisms due to its strong and resourceful local government (cf. Flyvbjerg, 2006), then local government action in Sweden becomes a critical case worthy of critical inquiry. In the sections that follow, this chapter elaborates aspects integral to the case studied. First, it briefiy presents the Swedish local government system and its development, highlighting the presence of strong local governments and their central role in the Swedish government system. This is followed by a presentation of Swedish policy development within the fields of climate change, energy generation and GHG mitigation, again highlighting the central role given to Swedish local government. The chapter ends with a set of conclusions aimed at an integrated analysis of the Swedish government system, national policy developments and the local component of the case study showing how these three components are, in fact, one integrated multilevel case. It is clear that the local government uses a form of institutional experimentation that mixes value systems and logics of both state and market in its strive to becoming a 'climate smart' city.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Climate Research Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67662 (URN)10.4324/9781315164779 (DOI)2-s2.0-85047530239 (Scopus ID)9781351675154 (ISBN)9781138057357 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-14 Created: 2018-06-14 Last updated: 2018-07-13Bibliographically approved
Moloney, S., Fünfgeld, H. & Granberg, M. (2018). Towards transformative action: learning from local experiences and contexts (1ed.). In: Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael (Ed.), Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints (pp. 146-156). Abingdon & New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards transformative action: learning from local experiences and contexts
2018 (English)In: Local action on climate change: opportunities and constraints / [ed] Moloney, Susie, Fünfgeld, Hartmut och Granberg, Mikael, Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 146-156-Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Advances in Climate Change Research
National Category
Climate Research
Research subject
Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62681 (URN)978-1-138-68152-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-17481-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Granberg, M., Nyberg, L. & Modh, L.-E. (2016). Understanding the local policy context of risk management: Competitiveness and adaptation to climate risks in the city of Karlstad, Sweden. Risk Management: An International Journal, 18(1), 26-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding the local policy context of risk management: Competitiveness and adaptation to climate risks in the city of Karlstad, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Risk Management: An International Journal, ISSN 1460-3799, E-ISSN 1743-4637, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 26-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To understand the situation of climate risk management we need to understand the priorities and politics of the wider policy context. The framing of potentially incompatible policy issues is important to take into account when analysing policy processes. In this article, we focus on two policy issues aiming at local adaptation to global forces: facilitating city competiveness and adapting to the impacts of global climate change. Global climate change always manifests itself in the local arena, which thus becomes a crucial site for adaptation to the risks connected to climate change. Adaptation has to correspond with the city policy agenda to build the attractive city through waterfront housing as a means to strengthen its competitiveness in a globalised economy. This article focuses on the relationship between pursuing competitiveness through waterfront housing and the needs to adapt to climate change in terms of contemporary and future flood risks.

Keywords
climate risks, policy context, competiveness, growth, climate adaptation
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41975 (URN)10.1057/rm.2015.21 (DOI)000372342100003 ()
Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5356-4112

Search in DiVA

Show all publications