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Nilsson, Jan
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Jansson, J., Larsson, M. & Nilsson, J. (2019). Specialister i prehospital akutsjukvård eller generalister anpassade till ett bredare och mera varierat uppdrag. In: : . Paper presented at Forum Värmland 14 februari 2019, Karlstad.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Specialister i prehospital akutsjukvård eller generalister anpassade till ett bredare och mera varierat uppdrag
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71447 (URN)
Conference
Forum Värmland 14 februari 2019, Karlstad
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J., Engström, M., Florin, J., Gardulf, A. & Carlsson, M. (2018). A short version of the nurse professional competence scale for measuring nurses' self-reported competence. Nurse Education Today, 71, 233-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A short version of the nurse professional competence scale for measuring nurses' self-reported competence
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2018 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 71, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale with 88-items has been used to measure self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses in many national and international nursing research projects. However, a shorter version of the scale with maintained quality has been requested to further enhance its usability.

Objectives

To develop and evaluate the construct validity and internal consistency of a shorter version of the NPC Scale.

Design

A developmental and methodological design.

Participants and Settings

The study was based on a sample of 1810 nursing students at the point of graduation from 12 universities in Sweden.

Methods

The number of items in the original NPC Scale was reduced using several established research steps and then evaluated for data quality and construct validity using principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was measured as internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha.

Results

The extensive process of reducing the number of items resulted in a version with 35 items. Principal component analysis resulted in six factors explaining 53.6% of the variance: “Nursing Care”, “Value-based Nursing Care”, “Medical and Technical Care”, “Care Pedagogics”, “Documentation and Administration of Nursing Care”, and “Development, Leadership, and Organization of Nursing Care”. All factors showed Cronbach's alpha values of >0.70. The confirmative factor analysis goodness-of-fit indexes were for root mean square error of approximation 0.05 and for comparative fit index 0.89.

Conclusions

The NPC Scale Short Form (NPC Scale-SF) 35-items revealed promising results with a six-factor structure explaining 53.6% of the total variance. This 35-item scale can be an asset when used alone and together with other instruments it can provide the possibility of more complex analyses of self-reported competence among nursing students and registered nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Nurses' competence, Nursing students' competence, Professional nursing, Nursing education, Validation, Psychometric properties
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69997 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2018.09.028 (DOI)000452938200038 ()
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Frieberg, O.-P., Millqvist, E., Nilsson, J. & From, I. (2018). Development and validation of the self-administered Falun health instrument (SAFHI) using data from health promoted workplaces in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 46(7), 735-743
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of the self-administered Falun health instrument (SAFHI) using data from health promoted workplaces in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 735-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to develop and to validate the self-administered Falun health instrument. An additional aim was to test its applicability in measuring people's lifestyles linked to health. Methods: In 2002, an instrument was constructed containing questions regarding the hazardous use of alcohol, tobacco, unhealthy diets and insufficient physical activity. A pilot study using the instrument was assessed between 2002 and 2006. In Sweden, it was further expanded and tested during the years 2004-2014 among a total of 1295 people. Results: Face validity was evaluated among colleagues and experts for clarity and completeness resulting in minor adjustments of some questions. With the test-retest method, the self-administered Falun health questionnaire showed a positive and high reproducibility and high compliance. Cronbach's alpha showed a high level of consistency (average 0.86). Factor analysis demonstrated the choice of questions correlated highly to the measured lifestyle. Conclusions: This study showed that the self-administered Falun health questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument, useful for detecting individuals at risk of developing diseases that are related to individual choice of lifestyle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70954 (URN)10.1177/1403494817728668 (DOI)000452488900009 ()29027502 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Castren, M., Makinen, M., Nilsson, J. & Lindström, V. (2017). The effects of interprofessional education - Self-reported professional competence among prehospital emergency care nursing students on the point of graduation - A cross-sectional study. International Emergency Nursing, 32, 50-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of interprofessional education - Self-reported professional competence among prehospital emergency care nursing students on the point of graduation - A cross-sectional study
2017 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 32, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to investigate whether interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) during the educational program had an impact on prehospital emergency care nurses' (PECN) self-reported competence towards the end of the study program. A cross-sectional study using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale was conducted. A comparison was made between PECN students from Finland who experienced IPE and IPC in the clinical setting, and PECN students from Sweden with no IPE and a low level of IPC. Forty-one students participated (Finnish n = 19, Swedish n = 22). The self-reported competence was higher among the Swedish students. A statistically significant difference was found in one competence area; legislation in nursing and safety planning (p < 0.01). The Finnish students scored significantly higher on items related to interprofessional teamwork. Both the Swedish and Finnish students' self-reported professional competence was relatively low according to the NPC Scale. Increasing IPC and IPE in combination with offering a higher academic degree may be an option when developing the ambulance service and the study program for PECNs. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65569 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2017.02.004 (DOI)000402650700010 ()28325485 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Theander, K., Wilde-Larsson, B., Carlsson, M., Florin, J., Gardulf, A., Johansson, E., . . . Nilsson, J. (2016). Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence. Nurse Education Today, 37, 178-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: Curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence
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2016 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported. Objectives: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented. Setting: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university. Participants: In total, 119 (2011 n = 69, 2014 n = 50) nursing students responded. Methods: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students- both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Nurse competence, Professional nursing, Nursing education, Nursing curriculum, Nursing student, NPC scale
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41200 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.11.012 (DOI)000371098300029 ()26703792 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J., Johansson, E., Carlsson, M., Florin, J., Leksell, J., Lepp, M., . . . Gardulf, A. (2016). Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters. Nurse Education in Practice, 17, 102-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters
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2016 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

Keywords
Disaster nursing, Nursing students, Registered nurses, NPC Scale
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42064 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2015.09.012 (DOI)000374622700017 ()26776502 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2017-08-15Bibliographically approved
Gardulf, A., Nilsson, J., Florin, J., Leksell, J., Lepp, M., Lindholm, C., . . . Johansson, E. (2016). The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation. Nurse Education Today, 36, 165-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation
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2016 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients. Objectives: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors. Methods and participants; The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1[20-56] years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated. Results: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27 years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (932% vs 875% of NSPGs). Summary and conclusion: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Nurses' competence, Professional nursing, Nursing education, Nursing students, Graduate nurses, Quality in care, Safety in care, NPC Scale
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-40990 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.09.013 (DOI)000367117000028 ()
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Bisholt, B., Jan, N. & Lillemor, L. (2015). Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(2), 361-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making the invisible visible: Operating theatre nurses’ perceptions of caring in perioperative practice
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 361-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
care, operating theatre nurse, perioperative nursing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-30605 (URN)10.1111/scs.12172 (DOI)000354260700019 ()25250842 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2018-11-01Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J., Johansson, E., Egmar, A.-C., Florin, J., Leksell, J., Lepp, M., . . . Wilde-Larsson, B. (2014). Development and validation of a new tool measuring nursesself-reported professional competence—The nurse professionalcompetence (NPC) Scale. Nurse Education Today, 2014(34), 574-580
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and validation of a new tool measuring nursesself-reported professional competence—The nurse professionalcompetence (NPC) Scale
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2014 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 2014, no 34, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competenceamong both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formalcompetence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHOguidelines.Design: A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometricproperties.Participants and settings: 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges.Results: The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88items and covering eight factors: “Nursing care”, “Value-based nursing care”, “Medical/technical care”, “Teaching/learning and support”, “Documentation and information technology”, “Legislation in nursing and safetyplanning”, “Leadership in and development of nursing care” and “Education and supervision of staff/students”.All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted intwo main themes: “Patient-related nursing” and “Nursing care organisation and development”. In addition,evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Midlothian, Scotland: Churchill Livingstone, 2014
Keywords
Nurses' competence, Professional nursing, Nursing education, Nursing students, Graduate nurses, Quality of care, Safety in healthcare, Scale development, Validation, Psychometric properties
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33841 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2013.07.016 (DOI)000333781600016 ()23938092 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-26 Created: 2014-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J. (2014). Nurse competence and its contribution to safe and high-quality patient care. In: : . Paper presented at SIGMA THETA TAU INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 2nd EUROPEAN REGIONAL CONFERENCE Leadership, Learning and Research in Nursing and Midwifery Dates 16-18 June 2014 in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse competence and its contribution to safe and high-quality patient care
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract for workshop

Background: The International Council of Nurses states that 90 % of all health-care services worldwide is delivered by nurses. In 2005 the Swedish National Board for Health and Welfare developed competence requirements for registered nurses, thereby describing the views and recommendations of the Swedish government and society with respect to nurses’ expected knowledge and skills. The competence requirements, which are in line with the Munich Declaration (2000), have the goal to contribute to safe and high-quality patient care. In order to assess the outcome of the competence requirement, a tool has been developed and validated by the Swedish Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) research project group. The tool is used for measuring self-reported competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses.

Aim/goal: To present studies conducted by the research group with focus on the use of  the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale and its potential use in research and quality improvement in nursing education and nursing practice in Sweden as well as in Europe.

Procedure: In this workshop the research group will present several studies and invite to explore and discuss its further applicability in the European context with aspects of professional nurse competence such as; (1) the establishment and use of the NPC Scale, (2) the current self-reported competence level among nurse students at 50% of the higher education institutions in Sweden, (3) the outcome of internationalization in nursing education among registered nurses and their self reported competence, (4) the level of self-reported disaster nursing competence among nurse students and graduated nurses, (5) the effect of educational interventions on nurse students self-reported competence.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33842 (URN)
Conference
SIGMA THETA TAU INTERNATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 2nd EUROPEAN REGIONAL CONFERENCE Leadership, Learning and Research in Nursing and Midwifery Dates 16-18 June 2014 in Gothenburg, Sweden
Available from: 2014-09-26 Created: 2014-09-26 Last updated: 2014-09-30Bibliographically approved
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