Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 28) Show all publications
Lindblom, A., Dindar, K., Soan, S., Kärnä, E., Roos, C. & Carew, M. T. (2020). Predictors and mediators of European student teacher attitudestoward autism spectrum disorder. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 89, Article ID 102993.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors and mediators of European student teacher attitudestoward autism spectrum disorder
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, ISSN 0742-051X, Vol. 89, article id 102993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about student teacher attitudes towards pupils with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We explored the predictors and mediators of attitudes toward ASD across three groups of European student teachers (N=704), within three national settings (Sweden N=262, Finland N=251, England N=191).  Key findings suggest greater contact quality, perceptions of positive social norms towards ASD, and perceptions of competence of people with ASD individually predict more positive attitudes, whereas greater affective intergroup anxiety predicts more negative attitudes. Contact quantity or perceptions of course knowledge, were not associated with attitudes.  Implications for teacher training in the three national settings are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
student teachers’ perceptions, inclusive education, ASD, contact, social norms, affective intergroup anxiety
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76643 (URN)10.1016/j.tate.2019.102993 (DOI)000512217600007 ()
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. (2019). Decolonizing teacher education. In: : . Paper presented at Interculturality in Teacher Education and Training: Methodologies, Criticality and Sustainability.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decolonizing teacher education
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Interculturality is about enabling relations based on equity and respect between cultures. When doing research within Indigenous context, I work within an Indigenist paradigm. This means putting my Western preconceptions aside as a non-Indigenous researcher, and embracing Indigenous philosophical assumptions. A core goal is decolonization, which entails the obligation to disseminate research results to student teachers as a step in decolonizing teacher education, and the academy. Knowledge about the history and organization of the Swedish educational system is a learning objective in teacher education.  In this paper session, I would like to discuss possible implications for intercultural relations that arise from the invisibility of Sámi schools, and their history, from the content in teacher education, using my work at Karlstad University, Sweden, as an example.

Keywords
Decolonization, teacher education, Sámi schools in Sweden
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Special Education; Intercultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72911 (URN)
Conference
Interculturality in Teacher Education and Training: Methodologies, Criticality and Sustainability
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. (2019). Rebalancing power relationships in research using visual mapping: examples from a project within an Indigenist research paradigm. PRACTICE Contemporary Issues In Practitioner Education, 1(1), 53-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rebalancing power relationships in research using visual mapping: examples from a project within an Indigenist research paradigm
2019 (English)In: PRACTICE Contemporary Issues In Practitioner Education, ISSN 2578-3858, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Engaging in respectful relationships is an essential aspect of all research and educational practices. Colonial residue, and the maltreatment and misinterpretation of Indigenous peoples by researchers, puts a great responsibility on the researcher to strive for balance in power relationships within Indigenous contexts. Even more so, in research and education involving Indigenous children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This may be easier said than done. In a PhD project on the meaning of music for First Nations children diagnosed with ASD in British Columbia, Canada, visual mapping was used to rebalance the power relationships between myself as a researcher and the research partners as a step toward decolonization. The visual maps were used to summarize conversation transcripts that could be used to validate my interpretations and disseminate the research results, create a mutual focal point for negotiating consent and participation and show progress over time. Visual methods, such as visual mapping, are beneficial to individuals with autism, and can also be useful when rebalancing power relations with other research partners, such as parents. In conclusion, visual mapping can be a useful tool for rebalancing power relationships in research and educational practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
First Nations, autism spectrum disorder, visual mapping, rebalancing power relationships, Indigenist research paradigm
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71886 (URN)10.1080/25783858.2019.1589989 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-22 Created: 2019-04-22 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A., Kärnä, E., Carew, M. ., Soan, S., Dindar, K. & Roos, C. (2018). Imagining inclusive education for pupils diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In: : . Paper presented at European Conference on Educational Research – ECER. 3-7 September, 2018, Bolzano, Italy..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imagining inclusive education for pupils diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Theoretical framework, objectives and research questions

In Sweden, Finland and England, inclusive education is advocated in school legislation. Subsequently, support for children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is generally provided within the mainstream classroom. It is likely that student teachers will encounter pupils with ASD during their practical placement, and in their profession, as ASD prevalence has risen markedly worldwide, and currently stands at approximately 1 in 100 (Autism Europe, 2016).

Teachers require knowledge about ASD to ensure inclusion and the adequate delivery of support and intervention methods. Such knowledge could be about representations of ASD regarding social interaction and communication, which can offer challenges for the pupil in the mainstream context (Shereen & Geuts, 2015). However, previous research has mainly examined teachers’ and student teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion of pupils with ASD (e.g. McGregor & Campbell, 2001; Ross-Hill, 2009), and not investigated teachers’ in-depth understanding of ASD interactions and communications. This study aims to fill the gap through the application of an empathy-based story-writing method with student teachers.

The project represents a collaboration between researchers in Psychology and Special Education at three European universities across Sweden, Finland and England. The purpose of this presentation is to present preliminary findings of this ongoing interdisciplinary research project and obtain feedback and comments from the scientific community.

The research questions posed in this phase of the project are:

  1. How do student      teachers describe imagined interactions with pupils diagnosed with ASD?
  2. How do student teachers      describe the success or failure of interaction with pupils with ASD?
  3. Are there      differences in student teachers’ stories between Sweden, Finland, and      England?

Methodology  

The project involved a survey with a quantitative section and qualitative sections. This paper presentation will focus on introducing results from the qualitative data, which consisted of a task where student teachers were asked to write about an imagined teaching situation. The student teachers were asked to write about a positive and a negative teaching situation with a new pupil diagnosed with ASD, a method referred to as empathy-based stories. Empathy-based stories are writings that are created by participants according to an introductory script provided by a researcher (Eskola, 1998). This method is also called a passive role-play method and it is used for gathering information on the experiences and ideas embedded in narratives produced by research participants. It was originally developed in social psychology and it is a modification of active role-playing method for studying the participant’s interpretations of situations (Ginsburg, 1979; Eskola, 1997). In our study, the student teachers were first asked to write about what happened in the classroom, and then how they felt about it. Next, they were asked to write about the interaction with the pupil, and lastly, what they felt the pupil thought about them. This exercise was planned to be short, approximately 5 minutes per story. The final sample comprised 704 student teachers (Swedish N = 262, Finnish N =251, English N = 191). A coding scheme was made by the Finnish researchers, and before coding in Sweden and England, 10 negative and 10 positive stories were co-rated by the research team to ensure adequate inter-rater reliability. 

Expected outcomes

The coding and analysis process is ongoing, but we plan to have some preliminary results to report from the three countries at the ECER conference.

References

Autism Europe. Prevalence rate of autism. (2016). Available from: http://www.autismeurope.org/about-autism/prevalence-rate-of-autism/

Eskola, J. (1997). Eläytymismenetelmäopas [A guide to method of empathy-based stories].Tampere: Tampereen yliopisto.

Eskola, J. (1998). Eläytymismenetelmä sosiaalitutkimuksen tiedonhankintamenetelmänä. [The method of empathy-based stories as a method of acquiring data in social research]. Tampere: Tampereen yliopisto.

Ginsburg, G.P. (1979). The effective use of role-playing in social psychological research. In G.P. Ginsburg (ed.). Emerging strategies in social psychological research, Chichester: Wiley. 117–54.

McGregor, E. & Campbell, E. (2001). The attitudes of teachers in Scotland to the integration of children with autism into mainstream schools. Autism: The International Journal of Research and Practice, 5(2), 189–207.

Ross-Hill, R. (2009). Teacher attitude towards inclusion practices and special needs students. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 9(3), 188–198.

Scheeren, A.M., & Geuts, H.M. (2015). Research on community intergration in autism spectrum disorder: Recommendations from research on psychosis.  Research in Autims Spectrum Disorders, 17, 1-12.

Talib.T.L., & Paulson, S. (2015). Differences in competence and beliefs about autism among teacher education students. The Teacher Educator (50)4, 240-256.                             

 

Intent of publication

It is intended that findings from this phase of the project contribute to at least one peer-reviewed article, to be disseminated in a high quality journal covering this area of interest, e.g., Autism, European Journal of Special Needs Education, International Journal of Inclusive Education, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, and The Teacher Educator. Conference presentations are also intended.

Keywords: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Student teachers, Disability Attitudes, Teacher Education, Inclusive Education

 

National Category
Educational Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Special Education; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69093 (URN)
Conference
European Conference on Educational Research – ECER. 3-7 September, 2018, Bolzano, Italy.
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. & Jannok-Nutti, Y. (2018). Special Education in Swedish Sámi Schools: A project in the Making. In: : . Paper presented at American Indigenous Research Association (AIRA) conference, Montana 11-13 Oktober 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Special Education in Swedish Sámi Schools: A project in the Making
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69629 (URN)
Conference
American Indigenous Research Association (AIRA) conference, Montana 11-13 Oktober 2018
Available from: 2018-10-14 Created: 2018-10-14 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. & Amsell, C. (2017). Autism in the Swedish school system: personal narratives. In: : . Paper presented at Asia Pacific Autism Conference 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autism in the Swedish school system: personal narratives
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, no diagnosis of any kind is required to get special support in school according to the Swedish Education Act. Furthermore, students should receive special support within the group of students they belong. As a lecturer and researcher in the field of special education, this is what I teach at Karlstad University, Sweden. Previously, I worked in a self-contained remedial classroom for young pupils with behavioral problems, who often were diagnosed with developmental disorders such as autism. There are, obviously, exceptions that are regulated in the Education Act. However, in practice, schools sometimes pressure parents to start a diagnosis process for their child, and not all pupils’ needs of special support are met. This became painfully apparent when my oldest grandchild entered the Swedish school system.

I am fifteen years old and I hate school. Teachers have never liked me, and I have always been to blame for my difficulties in school. This led to severe anxiety and social phobia. Currently, I am attending something called Not-School, which is adapted to match my needs. I have two days practicum with my step-grandfather, either in his workshop, on the farm or repairing machines. This is my fifth school. I hate school, but I like learning about things I am interested in. To compensate for my negative school experiences, my family is devoted to making my life outside of school as interesting, pleasurable and full as possible. I like playing computer/video games, riding my moto-cross, animals, working on engines, and travelling. With my grandmother I have been on vacations to Norway, Bulgaria and Greece, but also accompanied her on research related trips to Canada and the USA. This is my first autism presentation and my first visit to Australia.

 

National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63805 (URN)
Conference
Asia Pacific Autism Conference 2017
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. (2017). Exploring autism and music interventions through a First Nations lens. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship, 13(4), 202-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring autism and music interventions through a First Nations lens
2017 (English)In: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Scholarship, ISSN 1177-1801, E-ISSN 1174-1740, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 202-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research project set out to examine the meaning of music for five First Nations children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder in British Columbia, Canada. A pan-tribal framework within an Indigenist research paradigm was used. Data were collected during visits in 2013 and 2014. Five First Nations children with different tribal affiliations and living locations, their families, and professionals were engaged in the project. Methods were conversations, observations, filmed observations, interventions, and notes. It was found that current autism discourses and practices are based on a deficit model within Western paradigms, and therefore not compatible with inclusive, First Nations worldviews and perceptions of autism representations. Music is used for purposes such as relaxation, communication, and whenstudying. Indigenous music is not used in targeted music interventions. This article presents unique material, emphasizing the lack of cultural sensitivity, and colonial residue in music interventions for First Nations children with autism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
First Nations, autism, music, indigenist paradigm, Canada
National Category
Educational Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63799 (URN)10.1177/1177180117729854 (DOI)000441531700001 ()
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsLars Hierta Memorial FoundationHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. (2017). ‘It gives them a place to be proud’: Music and social inclusion. Two diverse cases of young First Nations people diagnosed with autism in British Columbia, Canada. Psychology of Music, 45(2), 268-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘It gives them a place to be proud’: Music and social inclusion. Two diverse cases of young First Nations people diagnosed with autism in British Columbia, Canada
2017 (English)In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 268-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Growing up and becoming an active participant in society can be challenging for young people. Factors such as ethnicity, disability and gender can, separately, pose difficulties. When combined, they can develop into insurmountable obstacles. The use of music interventions and activities to overcome some of these obstacles is explored in this article, using two cases of young First Nations people diagnosed with autism, in British Columbia, Canada. Although there are similarities, the differences in severity of ASD, place of residence and school situation, to mention a few factors, make a huge difference in their daily lives. Their contrasting possibilities to be present and participate in society may have implications for their social inclusion in adulthood. Results show that both traditional and contemporary music interventions can provide foundations for inclusion and they need to be carefully designed for each individual.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
autism, First Nations, music, social inclusion, young people
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-44694 (URN)10.1177/0305735616659553 (DOI)000400099100009 ()2-s2.0-85014620629 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsLars Hierta Memorial FoundationHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse
Available from: 2016-08-14 Created: 2016-08-14 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. & Toby, S. (2017). Resourceful Indigenous families of children with autism. In: : . Paper presented at Asia Pacific Autism Conference 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resourceful Indigenous families of children with autism
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a research project involving five First Nations families in British Columbia, Canada, with a child diagnosed with autism, it became apparent that autism support and diagnosis services can be difficult to access. In a pilot conversation, an Indigenous family in Australia revealed similar issues. To ensure care for their children, these families have to be creative and resourceful.

The aim of this presentation is present how two First Nations families acquire services, or provide care for their child when services are not available. Furthermore, an Indigenous, Australian medical doctor and mother of a child with autism, will tell about their struggle for appropriate services and support, and present the kit she has developed.

The research project used a pan-tribal framework. To address power issues and to reflect the reciprocal relationality in Indigenous worldviews, the term research partner is used instead of participant and conversation is used instead of interview. Other methods such as observations, video-filmed observations, intuition and dream were also used.

Access to services and support varies depending on living location. Results show that the First Nations families tend to their child’s needs in different ways, such as inclusively within a multi-generational family, and accessing services through autism funding are ways that First Nations families. The Australian family relocated to access services and support, and constructed a learning kit.

Resourcefulness is essential to all families with a member diagnosed with autism when community services and support systems fail to adequately serve their needs. However, for Indigenous families, the Western deficit model is not compatible with the inclusive, reciprocal worldviews. For them, their resourcefulness may be all they have to work with. Future research should address this gap between needs and support, and address cultural sensitivity and appropriateness.

 

National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63807 (URN)
Conference
Asia Pacific Autism Conference 2017
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, A. (2017). Stepping out of the shadows of colonialism to the beat of the drum: The meaning of music for five First Nations children with autism in British Columbia, Canada. (Doctoral dissertation). Jyväskylä: Grano Oy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stepping out of the shadows of colonialism to the beat of the drum: The meaning of music for five First Nations children with autism in British Columbia, Canada
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This dissertation set out to examine the meaning of music for First Nations childrenwith autism in BC, Canada. The research questions addressed were: How can thediagnosis of ASD be seen through a First Nations lens? How do the First Nationschildren with ASD use music? In which ways is music used in different domains?In which ways is music used to facilitate inclusion? How is traditional music used?The dissertation is based on four original articles that span over the issues of under-detection of autism among First Nations children in BC, ethnographic fieldwork,and the paradigmatic shift to Indigenist research methodologies, the role of music insocial inclusion and a First Nations lens on autism, the use of Indigenous music withFirst Nations children with autism, put in context with First Nations children’s rights.Material was collected during six week periods in two consecutive years, generatingdata from conversations, follow-up conversations, observations, video-filmed observations,and notes. Post-colonial BC, Canada is the context of the research, and issuesof social inclusion and children’s rights are addressed. During the research process,a journey that began with an ethnographic approach led to an Indigenist paradigm.It was found that colonial residue and effects of historical trauma can influenceFirst Nations children being under-detected for autism. The First Nations childrendiagnosed with autism in this study use music in similar ways to typically developingchildren and non-Indigenous individuals with autism. These uses include for communicationand relaxation, for security and happiness, to soothe oneself and whenstudying. However, music interventions in school settings are not culturally sensitive.Music as a tool for inclusion is overlooked and Indigenous music not utilizedoutside of optional Aboriginal classes. The most important lesson of the study wasthe significance of reciprocal experience, emphasized by the Indigenist paradigm. Itcan be suggested that carefully designed, culturally sensitive music interventions,in collaboration with traditional knowledge holders and Elders, would be beneficialfor the development of First Nations children with autism. Consequently, culturallysensitive music interventions could have potential to ensure that the children’s rightsare respected. For these interventions to be culturally adequate, specific IndigenousKnowledge must be the foundation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jyväskylä: Grano Oy, 2017. p. 67
Series
Publications of the University of Eastern Finland. Dissertations in Education, Humanities, and Theology, ISSN 1798-5633 ; 101
Keywords
First Nations, Autism, Music, Indigenist research methodologies, Inclusion
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48442 (URN)978-952-61-2430-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-04-21, AT 100, Agora building, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu campus, Joensuu, 12:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse The Kempe FoundationsLars Hierta Memorial Foundation
Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-01 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9637-5338

Search in DiVA

Show all publications