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Kim, Y. & Stattin, H. (2019). Parent-youth discussions about politics from age 13 to 28.. Journal of applied developmental psychology, 62, 249-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parent-youth discussions about politics from age 13 to 28.
2019 (English)In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 62, p. 249-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been commonly assumed that post-adolescent youth have fewer political discussions with parents than doadolescents, due to transitional events in young adulthood and the emergence of new age-appropriate socializingagents, like peers, colleagues, and romantic partners. We proposed a contrasting view that post-adolescent youthhave more frequent political discussions with parents due to their increased political interest over time. Using anaccelerated longitudinal design (n=4286), we found that neither transitional events nor political discussionswith other socializing agents decreased political discussions with parents. The long-term developmental trajectoriesfor political discussions with parents and youth's own political interest showed a linear increase fromadolescence to young adulthood. Cross-lagged models showed that youth's political interest positively predictedpolitical discussions with parents over time and vice-versa. These findings indicate a need to see political discussionswith parents as a parent-youth bidirectional process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Political discussions with parents; Political interest; Transitional events; Socializing agents; Adolescence; Young adulthood
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72060 (URN)10.1016/j.appdev.2019.04.001 (DOI)000470953900023 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M2008-0073:1-PK
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y., Evans, B. & Hagquist, C. (2019). Towards explaining time trends in adolescents’ alcohol use: A multilevel analysis of Swedish data from 1988 to 2011. European Journal of Public Health, 29(4), 729-735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards explaining time trends in adolescents’ alcohol use: A multilevel analysis of Swedish data from 1988 to 2011
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 729-735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Alcohol use has decreased among Swedish adolescents in the past few decades. We examined peer and parent factors (i.e., time spent with peers, time spent with parents, and parental monitoring) that could contribute to explaining this trend by investigating their main effects and interaction effects with investigation years on alcohol use. We furthermore examined whether municipality-level socioeconomic conditions could contribute to explaining the trend. Methods: We used data from a repeated cross-sectional study that took place eight times between 1988 and 2011. The study targeted all ninth grade students (15-to-16-year-olds) in Värmland County, Sweden. Adolescents (N = 22,257) reported their monthly alcohol use, time spent with peers and parents, and parental monitoring. Municipality-level socioeconomic conditions were based on parent education levels. Results: Logistic multilevel regression analyses showed that peer and parent factors and municipality-level socioeconomic conditions were associated with alcohol use among adolescents. The interaction effects between peer and parent factors and investigation years were not significant. The decreased trend in time spent with peers was associated with the decreased trend in frequency of alcohol use over time. Conclusion: The findings of the current study provide an indication that the decreased trend in alcohol use that has been observed in Swedish adolescents over the past few decades may be related to changes in adolescents’ social interactions with peers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent Alcohol Use; Time Trends; Parents; Peer Group; Socioeconomic Factors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71483 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckz023 (DOI)000486966400022 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012–1736
Available from: 2019-03-13 Created: 2019-03-13 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Kim, Y. (2018). Both parents and adolescents project their own values when perceiving each other’s values. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 42(1), 106-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both parents and adolescents project their own values when perceiving each other’s values
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 106-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How parents and adolescents perceive each other’s life values is a key to understanding successful value transmission. In the value socializations literature, it has been proposed that parents’ values become internalized when children correctly perceive their parents’ values and decide to adopt them as their own. In the current study, we propose that interpersonal value perception of broader life values is characterized by a perceptual bias—projection—which propels adolescents to perceive their parents’ values to be similar to their own, and propels parents to perceive their adolescents’ values to be similar to theirs. This cross-sectional study examined 518 dyads of adolescents and their parents. Adolescents rated how important different humanistic, environmental, and achievement values were to them, and how important these values were to their parents. Parents similarly rated how important these values were to them and to their adolescents. Using structural equation modeling, an interpersonal value perception model was constructed that estimated how much parents and adolescents projected their own values when perceiving each other’s values. The results supported the idea that both parents and adolescents substantially project their own values when perceiving the others’ values, and that they perceive the others’ values with low accuracy. We discuss our findings in light of value socialization in both research and practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
adolescents, interpersonal perception, life values, parents, projection, value transmission, values
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69991 (URN)10.1177/0165025417713728 (DOI)000417792400012 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2018-10-30 Created: 2018-10-30 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Hagquist, C., Evans, B. & Kim, Y. (2018). Discrepant trends for adolescent. In: : . Paper presented at The 16th International Conference on Social Stress Research, 2–4 June 2018, Athens, Greece..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discrepant trends for adolescent
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70405 (URN)
Conference
The 16th International Conference on Social Stress Research, 2–4 June 2018, Athens, Greece.
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y. & Hagquist, C. (2018). Mental health problems among economically disadvantaged adolescents in an increasingly unequal society: A Swedish study using repeated cross-sectional data from 1995 to 2011. SSM - Population Health, 6, 44-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health problems among economically disadvantaged adolescents in an increasingly unequal society: A Swedish study using repeated cross-sectional data from 1995 to 2011
2018 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 6, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing inequality in many societies highlights the importance of paying attention to differences in mental health between the economically disadvantaged adolescents and the non-disadvantaged adolescents. Also important is to understand how changing inequality in society over time influences adolescents’ mental health at the population- and individual-level. The current study examined to what extent increased societal-level income inequality over time, individual-level experiences of economic disadvantage and the cross-level interaction between the two explained Swedish adolescents’ mental health problems from 1995 to 2011. We used repeated cross-sectional data collected 6 times between 1995 and 2011 in Sweden. Each time, approximately 2,500 students in grade 9 completed a questionnaire during the spring semester. The adolescents provided self-report data on the frequency of their experiences of unaffordability of daily leisure activities (concert, movie, sports, and dance). They also reported their psychosomatic symptoms, which was used as a measure of mental health problems. We used the household equalised disposable income Gini coefficient as an indicator of societal income inequality. A real gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was controlled for in order to rule out potential effects of economic growth in the society over time. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted in which students were nested in years of investigations. Adolescents who experienced unaffordability of daily leisure activities reported more mental health problems. Societal income inequality was not directly associated with the adolescents’ mental health. However, among girls the effects of experiences of unaffordability on mental health were stronger for all but one (sports) activities, and among boys for one activity (sports) when societal-level inequality was greater. Individual-level economic disadvantage are detrimental for adolescents’ mental health, both directly and interactively with societal-level economic inequality. Some suggestions for practice and future studies are made for mental health among adolescents in societies where increasing inequality is observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Mental health problems, Inequality, Unaffordability, Economic disadvantage
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69152 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2018.08.006 (DOI)000451177600006 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012–1736
Available from: 2018-09-10 Created: 2018-09-10 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y. & Hagquist, C. (2018). Trends in adolescent mental health during economic upturns and downturns: a multilevel analysis of Swedish data 1988-2008. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 72(2), 101-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in adolescent mental health during economic upturns and downturns: a multilevel analysis of Swedish data 1988-2008
2018 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background A long-term trend of increasing mental health problems among adolescents in many Western countries indicates a great need to investigate if and how societal changes have contributed to the reported increase. Using seven waves of repeated cross-sectional data collected between 1988 and 2008 in Sweden, the current study examined if economic factors at the societal level (municipality unemployment rate) and at the individual level (worry about family finances), and their interaction could explain a secular trend in mental health problems.

Methods Participants were 17 533 students of age 15–16 years (49.3% girls), from 14 municipalities in a county of Sweden. Data on adolescents’ mental health (psychosomatic problems) and worry about family finances were obtained using a self-report questionnaire. A series of multilevel regression analyses were conducted in order to explain the trends in adolescents’ mental health.

Results The results indicated that the individual-level predictor (worry about family finances) significantly explained the increasing rates of adolescents’ psychosomatic problems. This was particularly the case during the mid-1990s, which was characterised by a severe recession in Sweden with high unemployment rates. For example, after accounting for adolescents’ worry, a significant increase in psychosomatic symptoms between 1988 and 1998 among girls (b=0.112, P<0.05) disappeared (b=0.018, P>0.05) and a non-significant decrease between 1988 and 1995 among boys (b=−0.017, P>0.05) became significant (b=−0.142, P<0.05). Neither municipality unemployment rate nor its interaction with adolescents’ worry explained psychosomatic problems.

Conclusions The findings demonstrate the effects of adolescents’ worry about family finances on a secular trend in mental health problems during an economically bleak period of time. The study highlights the need for repeated measurements including a large number of time points over a long time period in order to analyse time-specific putative explanatory factors for trends in adolescent mental health problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65358 (URN)10.1136/jech-2017-209784 (DOI)000423984300003 ()29203524 (PubMedID)
Projects
Mental health, unemployment, psychosocial factors, multilevel modeling, public health
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2012–1736
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y. & Amnå, E. (2015). Civic engagement among migrant youths in Sweden: do parental norms or immigration generation matter?. In: M. Barrett & B. Zani (Ed.), Political and civic engagement: multidisciplinary perspectives (pp. 248-267). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Civic engagement among migrant youths in Sweden: do parental norms or immigration generation matter?
2015 (English)In: Political and civic engagement: multidisciplinary perspectives / [ed] M. Barrett & B. Zani, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 248-267Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2015
Keywords
civic engagement, adolescence, immigrants, Sweden
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75529 (URN)978-0-415-70467-0 (ISBN)
Projects
PIDOP
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 225282
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y., Glassman, M. & Williams, M. S. (2015). Connecting agents: engagement and motivation in online collaboration. Computers in human behavior, 49, 333-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting agents: engagement and motivation in online collaboration
2015 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 49, p. 333-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores the relationship between social engagement and motivation to share knowledge in a hybrid college class using a web infused curriculum. Online social engagement, operationalized through concepts such as connectivity, social presence and social space has been an important topic of research in web based education for more than a decade. An important sub-text of this research is that online social engagement supports higher levels of collaboration. Students who feel comfortable with and connected to their online learning community are much more likely to be active participants in that community, working together to develop and build knowledge systems. Much of this research refers to the more social/participatory based educational theories of John Dewey and L.S. Vygotsky. There is though a second component of collaboration that helps drive community building in this theoretical frameworks; motivation to engage in a shared, relevant, goal oriented activity. While most theories on social engagement assume natural relationships between online social engagement and motivation to participate in a community, this relationship is not often discussed and examined very often. This paper specifically compares the relationship between classroom connectedness and motivation to share knowledge between students in a hybrid, web infused class and a more traditionally oriented class with a small web component. Analysis did find a highly significant relationship between connectedness and motivation to share knowledge in the hybrid class but not in the traditional class, suggesting an important relationship, but one based at least partially in targeted experience. 

Keywords
Internet, Education, Collaboration
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75528 (URN)10.1016/j.chb.2015.03.015 (DOI)000355351800039 ()2-s2.0-84925687644 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Kim, Y. & Amnå, E. (2015). Internet use and political engagement in youth. In: Coleman, J. and Freelon, D. (Ed.), Handbook of digital politics: . Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet use and political engagement in youth
2015 (English)In: Handbook of digital politics / [ed] Coleman, J. and Freelon, D., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015
Keywords
youth, civic engagement, internet use, standby citizens
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75527 (URN)9781782548751 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M2008-0073:1-E
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2773-4616

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