Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 96) Show all publications
Nysaeter, T. M., Olsson, C., Sandsdalen, T., Hov, R. & Larsson, M. (2024). Family caregivers' preferences for support when caring for a family member with cancer in late palliative phase who wish to die at home - a grounded theory study. BMC Palliative Care, 23(1), Article ID 15.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family caregivers' preferences for support when caring for a family member with cancer in late palliative phase who wish to die at home - a grounded theory study
Show others...
2024 (English)In: BMC Palliative Care, E-ISSN 1472-684X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundFamily caregivers are essential in end-of-life care for cancer patients who wish to die at home. The knowledge is still limited regarding family caregivers needs and preferences for support and whether the preferences change during the patient's illness trajectory. Therefore, the aim was to explore family caregivers' preferences for support from home care services over time when caring for a family member with cancer at the end of life who wished to die at home.MethodsA qualitative method was applied according to Grounded Theory. Data was collected longitudinally over the illness trajectory by means of repeated individual interviews (n = 22) with adult family caregivers (n = 11). Sampling, data collection and data analysis were undertaken simultaneously in line with the constant comparative method.ResultsThe findings are captured in the core category "hold out in duty and love". The categories "having control and readiness for action" and "being involved in care" describe the family caregivers' preferences for being prepared and able to handle procedures, medical treatment and care, and to be involved by the healthcare personnel in the patient's care and decision making. The categories "being seen and confirmed" and "having a respite" describe family caregivers' preferences for support according to their own needs to be able to persevere in the situation.ConclusionDespite deterioration in the patient's illness and the increasing responsibility family caregiver struggle to hold out and focus on being in the present. Over time together with deterioration in the patient's illness and changes in the situation, they expressed a need for more intense and extensive support from the home care services. To meet the family caregivers' preferences for support a systematic implementation of a person-centred care model and multicomponent psycho- educational interventions performed by nurses can be proposed. Moreover, we suggest developing a tool based on the conceptual model generated in this study to identify and map family caregivers' needs and preferences for support. Such a tool can facilitate communication and ensure person-centred interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Family caregiver preferences, Cancer, Palliative care, Home death, Grounded theory
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-98228 (URN)10.1186/s12904-024-01350-5 (DOI)001140965900002 ()38212707 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182092470 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-02 Created: 2024-02-02 Last updated: 2024-02-02Bibliographically approved
Nordaunet, O. M., Gjevjon, E. R., Olsson, C., Aagaard, H. & Borglin, G. (2024). What about the fundamentals of nursing-its interventions and its continuity among older people in need of home- or facility-based care: a scoping review. BMC Nursing, 23(1), Article ID 59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What about the fundamentals of nursing-its interventions and its continuity among older people in need of home- or facility-based care: a scoping review
Show others...
2024 (English)In: BMC Nursing, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 59Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThis scoping review investigated and descriptively summarised previous research about fundamental nursing, its focus (what care needs are described, how is it described and by whom is it described), continuity of care (is it described in relation to fundamental nursing) and possible nursing interventions or activities targeting older people's fundamentals of care needs in home- or facility-based care.MethodsThis scoping review was carried out following the steps of Arksey and O'Malley's methodology and PRISMA-ScR reporting guidelines. Searches were conducted in PubMed via NIH, CINAHL via EBSCO and PsycInfo via ProQuest for the time period between January 2002 and May 2023.ResultsForty-two studies were included where the majority had been conducted in a facility-based care context. Nutrition-or rather nutritional care activities targeting eating and drinking-was the most frequently described fundamental care needs addressed. After this came personal care such as cleansing, dressing, oral care, skin, and foot care. Few studies addressed more than one fundamental care need at the time. The nursing staff described fundamental nursing as complex, comprehensive, and demanding. Older people and relatives described a gap between the fundamental nursing provided and their perceived need for support. Less attention was given to older peoples relational and psychosocial needs. Identified nursing interventions mainly targeted physical care needs. Our findings also implied that interventions focusing on fundamental nursing were described as feasible in practice with favourable or moderate results, while long-term effects were difficult to detect. No studies were identified focusing on fundamental nursing in relation to outcomes such as continuity of care.ConclusionFundamental nursing was mainly described in relation to physical care needs, which were essentially conducted within facility-based care contexts. Interventions and activities primarily focused on one fundamental need at the time, mainly within the physical domain. No nursing interventions were identified focusing on relational and psychosocial needs where continuity of care can be viewed as a relevant outcome. Such limited focus are especially concerning as research has highlighted the importance of that older people with complex care needs can benefit from a holistic and person-centred approach i.e. fundamental nursing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2024
Keywords
Continuity of care, Interventions, Literature review, Long-term care, Nurse, Registered nurse
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-98558 (URN)10.1186/s12912-023-01675-1 (DOI)001147742300003 ()38254154 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182824917 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Karlstad University
Available from: 2024-02-19 Created: 2024-02-19 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Bergersen, E. B., Larsson, M., Kreicbergs, U. & Lövgren, M. (2023). A long-term follow-up of The Family Talk Intervention when a parent with dependent children is severely ill. In: : . Paper presented at EAPC, Rotterdam, 15-17 June.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A long-term follow-up of The Family Talk Intervention when a parent with dependent children is severely ill
Show others...
2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-99351 (URN)
Conference
EAPC, Rotterdam, 15-17 June
Available from: 2024-04-17 Created: 2024-04-17 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved
Ringnér, A., Björk, M. & Olsson, C. (2023). Effects of Person-Centered Information for Parents of Children With Cancer (the PIFBO Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing, 40(6), 369-439
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Person-Centered Information for Parents of Children With Cancer (the PIFBO Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial
2023 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nursing, ISSN 2752-7530, E-ISSN 2752-7549, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 369-439Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Conveying information to parents is a core part of pediatric oncology nursing; however, most published interventions do not tailor information to individual parental needs. Objective: To evaluate the effect on parental illness-related stress of person-centered information provided to parents of children with cancer. Methods: A multicenter, unblinded randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms recruiting parents of children diagnosed within the past two months from two tertiary children’s cancer centers in Sweden. Parents were randomized using sealed envelopes prepared and opened by an independent person. Parents in the intervention arm met four times with experienced nurses trained in the intervention, whereas controls received standard care. The effect of the intervention was measured five times regarding parents’ illness-related stress. Secondary outcomes were psychosocial states, experiences with healthcare providers, and received information. Further, we collected process data on the intervention’s content and fidelity. Results: Of the 32 parents included and analyzed in the study, 16 were randomized to the intervention, which addressed a broad variety of topics. The intervention increased parents’ knowledge about the biophysiological and functional aspects of their child’s illness, but it had no measurable effect on their distress. Discussion: Although fidelity to the intervention protocol was sufficient, the study was flawed by recruitment difficulties, primarily due to organizational factors, which may have prevented us from observing any possible effects on psychosocial distress. Having a person-centered perspective could be promising for future studies aimed at parents of children with cancer. (Registered at Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT02332226.).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
parents, person-centered information, questionnaires, randomized controlled study
National Category
Nursing Pediatrics
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-93847 (URN)10.1177/27527530221115860 (DOI)000921986100001 ()2-s2.0-85147513006 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR20130086
Available from: 2023-03-06 Created: 2023-03-06 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Lundberg, M., Orwelius, L., Klompstra, L., Schimanke, M. & Strömberg, A. (2023). Experiences and feasibility of tele-yoga for persons with post COVID 19 condition - a mixed method design. In: : . Paper presented at The Nordic Conference in Nursing Research in Reykjavík, Iceland, 2-4 October.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences and feasibility of tele-yoga for persons with post COVID 19 condition - a mixed method design
Show others...
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-99323 (URN)
Conference
The Nordic Conference in Nursing Research in Reykjavík, Iceland, 2-4 October
Available from: 2024-04-16 Created: 2024-04-16 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved
Eklund, A. J., Carlson, E., Sundin-Andersson, C. & Olsson, C. (2023). Experiences of the clinical learning environment in peer learning: A mixed method study from bachelor students’ and main preceptors’ perspectives. Nordic journal of nursing research, 43(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of the clinical learning environment in peer learning: A mixed method study from bachelor students’ and main preceptors’ perspectives
2023 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a lack of clinical placements for bachelor nursing students (BNS). Due to this, stringent educational models for clinical practice need to be developed. The aim was to describe bachelor nursing students’ and main preceptors’ experiences of the clinical learning environment during peer learning. This mixed method study was based on a joint project between the Karlstad University and the Region Värmland, Sweden, where peer learning was launched in two geriatric clinical education wards. A total of 23 bachelor nursing student and four main preceptors participated. The data were collected in parallel, qualitative data through focus group interviews and reflective journals, and quantitative data with the CLES + T scale between November 2017 and February 2018. A directed content analysis of all results was performed. The COREQ Checklist was used. The student–patient and the student–main preceptor relationships were important for the students’ development. The students described the educational atmosphere as comfortable and safe and that the staff were knowledgeable about them. Peer learning with close interaction between patients and all staff can create authenticity, which in turn drives the BNSs’ professional development. All staff should be involved in the supervision of the students and include them as members of the nursing team.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
clinical education, learning environment, nursing students, peer learning
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-92306 (URN)10.1177/20571585221126597 (DOI)2-s2.0-85139051455 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-27 Created: 2022-10-27 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, K., Olsson, C., Erlandsson, A., Ahlberg, K. M. & Larsson, M. (2023). Exploring Symptom Clusters and Their Measurements in Patients With Lung Cancer: A Scoping Review for Practice and Research. Oncology Nursing Forum, 50(6), 783-815
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Symptom Clusters and Their Measurements in Patients With Lung Cancer: A Scoping Review for Practice and Research
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 783-815Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: This scoping review aimed to explore symptom clusters (SCs) in patients with lung cancer and how included symptoms and symptom dimensions are measured. LITERATURE SEARCH: PubMed®, CINAHL®, Scopus®, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies published until December 31, 2021. Fifty-three articles were included. DATA EVALUATION: Data extracted included descriptive items and SC constellations. Patient-reported outcome instruments and measured symptom dimensions were described according to the middle-range theory of unpleasant symptoms. SYNTHESIS: 13 articles investigated SCs a priori and 40 de novo. Thirty-six instruments were used, mostly measuring intensity alone or in combination with timing. Qualitative articles (n = 6) provided rich descriptions within the distress, timing, and quality dimensions. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: Fatigue was the symptom found to most frequently co-occur with other symptoms in SCs. Fatigue, psychological symptoms, and nutritional aspects are emphasized as important areas for oncology nursing practice and further research to improve SC management for patients with lung cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oncology Nursing Society, 2023
Keywords
lung cancer, patient-reported outcome instruments, symptom cluster, symptom dimensions
National Category
Nursing Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97562 (URN)10.1188/23.ONF.783-815 (DOI)001165020300001 ()37874760 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175741289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-28 Created: 2023-11-28 Last updated: 2024-03-08Bibliographically approved
Edlund, S. M., Söderstrand, J. C., Åkerman, B., Hed, E., Larsson, M., Tillfors, M. & Olsson, C. (2023). Facing negative emotions: Evaluation of a brief training in validating communication for contact nurses in cancer care. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 66, Article ID 102401.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facing negative emotions: Evaluation of a brief training in validating communication for contact nurses in cancer care
Show others...
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 66, article id 102401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Contact nurses in cancer care (CNCC) often face challenges when communicating with patients and their families. The overall aim was to evaluate a brief digital validation training for CNCC, to test whether it was associated with increased validation and decreased invalidation. Associations between communication skills in validation and markers of work-related stress were also investigated. Methods: This intervention study investigated associations between the training and validation skills using a within-group design with repeated measures (at pre, post, and eight-week follow-up). Additionally, associations between the training and occupational self-efficacy, self-validation, and exhaustion symptoms were explored. Results: Seventeen CNCCs (all female with relatively long work experience) completed a five-week digital training program. Results indicated a statistically significant increase in validation and a statistically significant decrease in invalidation, showing that the nurses improved their communication skills following the training. No changes were found in markers of work-related stress. Conclusion: The results indicate that digital validation training for CNCCs is potentially beneficial by means of improving communication skills. This study further demonstrates that a brief digital training in validating communication to CNCC is associated with improved person-centered communication regarding strong negative emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Communication training, Contact nurses in cancer care, Intervention study, Invalidation, Occupational self-efficacy, Person-centered communication, Self-validation, Symptoms of exhaustion, Validation
National Category
Psychology Nursing
Research subject
Psychology; Nursing Science; Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97126 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2023.102401 (DOI)001138007100001 ()37741146 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171545148 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region VärmlandKarlstad University
Available from: 2023-10-20 Created: 2023-10-20 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Nordaunet, O. M., Gjevjon, E. R., Olsson, C., Aagaard, H. & Borglin, G. (2023). Fundamental nursing care focusing on older people’s needs and continuity of long-term care: A scoping review protocol. BMJ Open, 13(3), Article ID e069798.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fundamental nursing care focusing on older people’s needs and continuity of long-term care: A scoping review protocol
Show others...
2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e069798Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge about long-term care services ability, regardless of if the service is home-based or facility-based, to provide an optimal and comprehensive fundamental nursing care (understood as focusing on physical, relational and psychosocial needs) consistently over time is sparse. Research into nursing indicates the presence of a discontinuous and fragmented healthcare service, and that fundamental nursing care such as mobilisation, nutrition and hygiene among older people (65 years and above) seems to be, regardless of reasons, systematically rationed by nursing staff. Thus, our scoping review aims to explore the published scientific literature on fundamental nursing care and continuity of care targeting older people’s needs while also describing identified nursing interventions with the same foci in a long-term care context. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The upcoming scoping review will be conducted in accordance with Arksey and O’Malley’s methodological framework for scoping studies. Search strategies will be developed and adjusted to each database, for example, PubMed, CINAHL and PsychINFO. Searches will be limited to the years 2002-2023. Studies focusing our aim, regardless of study design, will be eligible for inclusion. Included studies will be quality assessed and data will be charted using an extraction form. Textual data will be presented through a thematic analysis and numerical data by a descriptive numerical analysis. This protocol adheres to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol checklist. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The upcoming scoping review will take into consideration ethical reporting in primary research as part of the quality assessment. The findings will be submitted to an open-access peer-reviewed journal. Under the Norwegian Act on Medical and Health-related Research, this study does not need ethical clearance by a regional ethical review authority as it will not generate any primary data or obtain sensitive data or biological samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
Methodology, Aged, Humans, Long-Term Care, Nursing Care, Research Design, Review Literature as Topic, Systematic Reviews as Topic
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-94276 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-069798 (DOI)000991985100056 ()36977539 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151108795 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-19 Created: 2023-04-19 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Granrud, M. D., Grondahl, V. A., Helgesen, A. K., Bååth, C., Olsson, C., Tillfors, M., . . . Sandsdalen, T. (2023). Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Cross-Sectional. Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, 16, 2893-2903
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health Care Personnel's Perspectives on Quality of Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic - A Cross-Sectional
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 16, p. 2893-2903Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The provision of high-quality palliative care is challenging, especially during a pandemic like COVID-19. The latter entailed major consequences for health care systems and health care personnel (HCP) in both specialist and community health care services, in Norway and worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore how the HCP perceived the quality of palliative care in nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This study had a cross-sectional design. A total of 290 HCP from Norway participated in the study (RR = 25.8%) between October and December 2021. The questionnaire comprised items concerning respondents' demographics and quality of care, the latter measured by the short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective-Palliative Care instrument, adapted for HCP. The STROBE checklist was used. Results: This study shows that the HCP scored subjective importance as higher in all dimensions, items and single items than their perception of the actual care received. This could indicate a need for improvement in all areas. Information about medication, opportunity to participate in decisions about medical and nursing care and continuity regarding receiving help from the same physician and nurse are examples of areas for improvement. Conclusion: Study results indicate that HCP from nursing homes, medical care units, and intensive care units perceived that quality of palliative care provided was not in line with what they perceived to be important for the patient. This indicate that it was challenging to provide high-quality palliative care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press, 2023
Keywords
COVID-19 pandemic, health care personnel perspective, palliative care, quality of care
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Nursing Science; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97290 (URN)10.2147/JMDH.S419442 (DOI)001079862400001 ()37790989 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174708432 (Scopus ID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, DNR 200393
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0944-5650

Search in DiVA

Show all publications