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Jernbro, C., Bonander, C. & Beckman, L. (2019). The association between disability and unintentional injuries among adolescents in a general education setting: Evidence from a Swedish population-based school survey. Disability and Health Journal, Article ID 100841.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between disability and unintentional injuries among adolescents in a general education setting: Evidence from a Swedish population-based school survey
2019 (English)In: Disability and Health Journal, ISSN 1936-6574, E-ISSN 1876-7583, article id 100841Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death among adolescents. Adolescents with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable with an increased risk of unintentional injuries. Objective: To study the association between a set of disabilities and unintentional injury risks among adolescents, accounting for comorbidity, subjective disability severity and sex. Method: Cross-sectional data from a Swedish national school survey including 4,741 students (15 and 17-year olds) conducted in 2016 was analyzed using log-binomial generalized linear models. Results: We found a 33% increased risk of injury the last 12 months and a 53% increased risk of injury leading to hospitalization for adolescents with any disability compared to their peers with no disability. The differences in injury risk were greater for girls than boys. There was a dose-response relationship between disability severity and injury risk. In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and comorbidity, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy were associated with an increased risk of injury the last 12 months, risk ratios [RR] were 1.41 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.08–2.97) and 1.79 (95% CI 1.10–1.81) respectively. Autism spectrum disorder was associated with a decreased injury risk the last 12 months (RR = 0.43, CI 0.2–0.92). ADHD, mobility impairment and visual impairment were associated with hospitalization due to injury during lifetime. Conclusions: There was an increased risk of unintentional injuries for adolescents with disabilities compared to their non-disabled peers, specifically for individuals with ADHD, epilepsy, visual impairment and mobility impairment. Injury prevention strategies may include adapting the physical environment and medical treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cognitive disabilities, Comorbidity, Epilepsy, Injury risk, Physical impairment
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75718 (URN)10.1016/j.dhjo.2019.100841 (DOI)2-s2.0-85072242310 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-11-12 Created: 2019-11-12 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Engh, L., Jernbro, C., Lin, P.-I., Bornehag, C.-G. & Eriksson, U.-B. (2018). Can school attachment modify the relation between foster care placement and school achievement?. British Journal of School Nursing, 13(4), 175-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can school attachment modify the relation between foster care placement and school achievement?
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1752-2803, E-ISSN 2052-2827, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen group, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67218 (URN)10.12968/bjsn.2018.13.4.178 (DOI)
Note

I avhandlingen med titeln Could school attachment modify the relation between foster care placement and school achievement : Results from s Swedish population-based study

Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Koivula, T., Ellonen, N., Janson, S., Jernbro, C., Huhtala, H. & Paavilainen, E. (2018). Psychological and physical violence towards children with disabilities in Finland and Sweden. Journal of Child Health Care, 22(3), 317-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological and physical violence towards children with disabilities in Finland and Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 317-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article describes psychological aggression and physical violence by Swedish and Finnish mothers (N = 3420) towards their 0- to 12-year-old children with disabilities (N = 286) by comparing such behaviour with the mothers of children without disabilities (N = 3134). The survey data are based on representative samples from Finland and Sweden of mothers’ reports of their behaviour towards their child in conflict situations. Mothers of children with disabilities reported more psychological aggression towards their child than did mothers of children without disabilities. Mothers used psychological aggression, especially towards children with neurological/psychological disabilities. However, the only significant difference regarding physical violence was repetitive use of mild physical violence. Overall, the analysis suggests that children with neurological/psychological disabilities are more exposed to both psychological and physical violence than children without disabilities or children with somatic/developmental disabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Child, disability, long-term illness, mother, violence
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66534 (URN)10.1177/1367493518757379 (DOI)000442390000003 ()2-s2.0-85041550351 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, J., Jernbro, C. & Nilson, F. (2018). There is more to Life than Risk Avoidance: Elderly Peoples Perspectives of Falls and Compliant Flooring. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13(1), 1-9, Article ID 1479586.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>There is more to Life than Risk Avoidance: Elderly Peoples Perspectives of Falls and Compliant Flooring
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-9, article id 1479586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Falls are the most common cause of injury in all ages and are especiallydifficult to prevent among residential care residents. Compliant flooring has beenproposed as a measure to prevent fall-injury, however little is known regarding theimplementation aspects in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to explore thefrail elderly person's view on falls, the risk of fall-injury, prevention in general andspecifically compliant flooring as an injury preventative measure. Methods. In this qualitative study, we used the grounded theory method and conductedin depths interviews with eight elderly people in residential care.Results. The identified categories were Falling as a part of life, Fearing theconsequences and A wish to prevent falls and injuries. Through the results is was clearthat There is more to life than risk avoidance, permeated the interviews, thereforeforming the grounded theory. The interviewees viewed falls as something common andnormal, and were uninterested in focusing on the risk of falls. Although they wanted toprevent falls, it was often difficult to integrate preventative measures into their everydaylife. They embraced the idea of an injury reducing compliant flooring, but their maininterests lie elsewhere.Conclusions. The results in this paper propose explanations on the obstacles ofimplementing fall prevention measures in an elderly frail population. The findings cangive us insights as to why interest, compliance for active fall prevention measures arelow, and on various factors that have to be taken under consideration in the process ofconstructing prevention. Compliant flooring is a passive fall injury prevention measurethat does not require the target group to make active decisions, adapt or activelyparticipate in the program. Therefore, we conclude that complaint flooring, from theperspective of the residents, can work well in residential care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Injury Prevention; Impact-Absorbing Flooring; Low-Impact Flooring; Nursing Home;
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66657 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2018.1479586 (DOI)000434312600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, 2013-4176
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Jernbro, C., Otterman, G., Tindberg, Y., Lucas, S. & Janson, S. (2017). Disclosure of maltreatment and perceived adult support among Swedish adolescents. Child Abuse Review, 26(6), 451-464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disclosure of maltreatment and perceived adult support among Swedish adolescents
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2017 (English)In: Child Abuse Review, ISSN 0952-9136, E-ISSN 1099-0852, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 451-464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38175 (URN)10.1002/car.2443 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Bonander, C. & Jernbro, C. (2017). Does gender moderate the association between intellectual ability and accidental injuries?: Evidence from the 1953 Stockholm Birth Cohort study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 106, 109-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does gender moderate the association between intellectual ability and accidental injuries?: Evidence from the 1953 Stockholm Birth Cohort study
2017 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 106, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62581 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2017.06.001 (DOI)000412964000011 ()28600987 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, J., Rahm, G., Jernbro, C. & Nilson, F. (2017). Effects of Impact-Absorbing Flooring in Residential Care from the Perspectives of Enrolled Nurses. Journal of Housing for the Elderly, 31(4), 367-381
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Impact-Absorbing Flooring in Residential Care from the Perspectives of Enrolled Nurses
2017 (English)In: Journal of Housing for the Elderly, ISSN 0276-3893, E-ISSN 1540-353X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 367-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Falls are a daily occurrence in nursing homes and few interventions for reducing fall-related injuries have proven to be effective. Impact absorbing flooring (IAF) in residential care has shown promising results in reducing fail-injuries and in the process of developing and implementing IAF all aspects are valuable to explore. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study is to describe the enrolled nurses (ENs) experiences of IAF. We carried out focus group interviews with ENs and used content analysis to process the data. The ENs experienced both negative and positive aspects with the IAF. Importantly, the ENs perceived the IAF as effective in preventing fall-injuries. They also appreciated the improvements in acoustics. Negative aspects were that the flooring initially was challenging to walk on and that it made it harder to maneuver heavy equipment. A significant and transferable finding in this study was the importance of the ENs' perceived difficulty in preventing fall-injuries amongst elderly people living in nursing homes. This seemed to be a driving force to accept the intervention. Although IAF affects the working conditions in a nursing home, ENs are willing to accept these issues given the perceived effectiveness of the intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65975 (URN)10.1080/02763893.2017.1335670 (DOI)000419504100004 ()
Note

Artikeln ingick i författarens licentiatuppsats, då med titeln Working in a nursing home with Impact Absorbing Flooring - a qualitative study on the experiences of licensed practical nurses.

Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Lucas, S., Jernbro, C., Tindberg, Y. & Janson, S. (2016). Bully, bullied and abused. Associations between violence at home and bullying in childhood. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(1), 27-35
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bully, bullied and abused. Associations between violence at home and bullying in childhood
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim was to examine experiences of bullying among Swedish adolescents and whether victims and perpetrators were also exposed to violence in the home, with particular focus on how abuse severity affected the risk of exposure to bullying. Methods: A nationally representative sample of pupils aged 14-15 responded to a questionnaire exploring exposure to corporal punishment and other types of violence. Results were analysed using Pearson's chi-square and multiple logistic regression, adjusting for factors regarding the child, the parents and the families' socioeconomic status. Results: Among the 3197 respondents, a significant proportion reported at least one incident of either bullying victimisation (girls 36%, boys 26%) or bullying perpetration (girls 24%, boys 36%). Physical and emotional violence in the home, including witnessed intimate partner violence, were significantly associated with both bullying victimisation and bullying perpetration. Odds ratios for exposure to bullying rose with increasing frequency and severity of abuse. Adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.6 for any event of abuse vs. single episodes of bullying to 20.3 for multiple types of abuse vs. many episodes of bullying. The child's gender and the presence of a chronic health condition were consistently associated with nearly all levels of abuse and bullying. Conclusions: Bullying experiences are common among youth and are clearly associated with abuse. Frequent bullying, whether as victim or perpetrator, warrants particular vigilance, as it appears to be an indicator of severe violence in the home.

Keywords
Child abuse, bullying, physical abuse, psychological abuse, intimate partner violence
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41175 (URN)10.1177/1403494815610238 (DOI)000369969000006 ()26472326 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Jernbro, C. (2016). CHILD MALTREATMENT FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE: PREVALENCE, HEALTH, DISCLOSURE AND SUPPORT. Injury Prevention, 22, A159-A159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CHILD MALTREATMENT FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE: PREVALENCE, HEALTH, DISCLOSURE AND SUPPORT
2016 (English)In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 22, p. A159-A159Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65081 (URN)10.1136/injuryprev-2016-042156.437 (DOI)000405066801123 ()
Available from: 2017-11-02 Created: 2017-11-02 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Bonander, C., Beckman, L., Janson, S. & Jernbro, C. (2016). Injury risks in schoolchildren with attention-deficit/hyperactivity or autismspectrumdisorder: Results from two school-based health surveys of 6- to 17-year-old children in Sweden. Journal of Safety Research, 58, 49-56
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury risks in schoolchildren with attention-deficit/hyperactivity or autismspectrumdisorder: Results from two school-based health surveys of 6- to 17-year-old children in Sweden
2016 (Swedish)In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 58, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Injuries are one of the leading causes of death and disability among children in Sweden and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has previously been associated with an increased risk of injury in pediatric populations elsewhere in the world. Current evidence regarding the possible link between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and injury risk appears limited, even though some potentially risk-increasing symptoms overlap. The purpose of this study was thus to study the association between both ADHD and ASD concerning the risk of injury among Swedish schoolchildren. Methods: Two samples were used: a population based register study containing data from 18,416 children ranging from the ages of 6-17 years collected by school nurses during 2012/2014 (Survey A), and a national cross-sectional study of 3202 ninth-grade children (similar to 15 years old) collected from 92 schools in 2011 (Survey B). The data were analyzed using chi(2)-tests and log binomial generalized linear models to obtain risk ratios (RR), comparing cases reportedly affected by ADHD or ASD to unaffected controls. Results: After adjusting for confounders, ADHD was associated with a 65% increased risk of injury (RR 1.65 [95% CI: 132-2.05] in Survey A, and a 57% increased risk of injury (RR 1.57 [95% CI: 1.27-1.95]) in Survey B. ASD was not significantly associated with any differences in injury risk (RR 0.81 [95% CI: 0.57-1.14]). Conclusions: The results indicate that there is an elevated injury risk among Swedish schoolchildren with ADHD but not for children with ASD. Future studies should focus on causal mechanisms mediating the association between ADHD and injuries in order to facilitate injury prevention strategies. Practical applications: Parents and teachers of schoolchildren with ADHD should be made aware of the elevated injury risks associated with the diagnosis. Safety experts and injury control professionals should consider the development of specialized prevention strategies in order to reduce these risks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science; Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45529 (URN)10.1016/j.jsr.2016.06.004 (DOI)000383934100006 ()
Available from: 2016-08-31 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4526-2752

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