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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Anclair, M., Lappalainen, R., Muotka, J. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(1), 389-396
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Parents of children with chronic conditions often experience a crisis with serious mental health problems for themselves as a consequence. The healthcare focus is on the children; however, the parents often worry about their children's health and future but are seldom offered any counselling or guidance.

Aim

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two group-based behavioural interventions on stress and burnout among parents of children with chronic conditions.

Design, participants and setting

After a waiting list control period (n = 28), parents were offered either a cognitive behavioural (CBT, n = 10) or a mindfulness program (MF, n = 9).

Results

Both interventions decreased significantly stress and burnout. The within-group effect sizes were large in both interventions (CBT, g = 1.28–1.64; MF, g = 1.25–2.20).

Conclusions

Hence, the results of this pilot study show that treating a group using either CBT or mindfulness can be an efficient intervention for reducing stress levels and burnout in parents of children with chronic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
stress, care giving, chronic illness, cognitive, behaviour therapy, mindfulness, nursing models, burn-out, parents of children with chronic conditions
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48332 (URN)10.1111/scs.12473 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2018-03-01Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, S., Eriksson, L. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 19, 204-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle
2018 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 19, p. 204-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cognitive intervention programme 'New Challenges' targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle was evaluated in a pilot study. The participants were divided into a cognitive treatment group (n = 32) and a control group (n = 11). In the control group, six participants had no treatment and five participated in 12-step treatment. The participants were measured pre and post using the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS), the abridged version of sense of coherence (SOC), Positive and Negative Affect Scale, and Bergström's quality of programme delivery (QPD). The results of the treatment group showed that criminal thinking patterns dropped significantly from high values to close to normal level. SOC and positive affect increased significantly in the treatment group. Both SOC and positive affect showed positive correlation with QPD. Regarding the possible influence of the 12-step treatment, there was no difference in the control group between participants receiving 12-step treatment and those not receiving treatment. The main conclusion is that the cognitive treatment programme 'New Challenges' can contribute to reduced criminal thinking and increased SOC and positive affect, which may prove to be important precursors of reduced criminality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Criminality, crime prevention, PICTS, SOC, PANAS, client satisfaction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67398 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2018.1513202 (DOI)
Note

Ingick i licentiatuppsatsen som manuskript med titeln: Evaluation of the Swedish Cognitive Intervention Programme "New Challenges" Targeting Adult Men with a Criminal Lifestyle

Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, P. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions. PLoS ONE, 13(7), Article ID e0201155.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness have all been associated with psychological disorders and well-being. This study investigates whether they predict psychological distress, i.e., symptoms of burnout, depression, stress and anxiety, in parents of children with chronic conditions. We hypothesized that these factors would exhibit a large degree of common variance, and that when compared to mindfulness and defusion, experiential avoidance on its own would predict a larger proportion of unique variance. 75 parents of children with chronic conditions having burnout symptoms who participated in an intervention study completed measures of burnout, stress, anxiety, depression, experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness at the beginning of the intervention study (baseline). We ran several regression analyses to assess the predictive ability of these different constructs. Experiential avoidance on its own accounted for 28-48% of the variance in different psychological symptoms. Cognitive defusion and mindfulness did not make a significant contribution to explaining burnout, stress and anxiety, but cognitive defusion contributed to explaining depression. The results confirmed our hypothesis, supporting research on the importance of psychological flexibility as a central factor in understanding the occurrence of psychological distress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
Keywords
COMMITMENT THERAPY, MINDFULNESS QUESTIONNAIRE, INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, EXPERIENTIAL AVOIDANCE, CONSTRUCT-VALIDITY, ACCEPTANCE, BURNOUT
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68794 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0201155 (DOI)000439942500085 ()30044852 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Ekman, E. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). The Cognitive Profile of Persons with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 14, 304-311, Article ID CPEMH-14-304.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cognitive Profile of Persons with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
2018 (English)In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, ISSN 1745-0179, E-ISSN 1745-0179, Vol. 14, p. 304-311, article id CPEMH-14-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is often comorbid with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). But to what extent can obsessional symptoms in individuals with ASD be considered “genuinely” comorbid OCD – or are there other mechanisms that are related to ASD? Which mechanisms in OCD with and without ASD share common features? People with ASD have a cognitive profile characterized by “mindblindness”; the antecedent is often referred to in terms of not knowing how to perform or behave and this is the cause of discomfort. This raises the question whether individuals with ASD and comorbid OCD share the same cognitive elements of responsibility interpretation and the same fear of causing harm as individuals who merely have OCD.

Objective: The aim of the present study is therefore to evaluate the extent of responsibility interpretation in individuals with OCD alone compared with people experiencing OCD in the context of ASD.

Methods: Two instruments, the Responsibility Attitude Scale (RAS) and the Responsibility Interpretations Questionnaire (RIQ), were administered to three groups of participants: (i) individuals diagnosed with OCD (n = 32); (ii) individuals with ASD and OCD (n = 19); and (iii) non-clinical control participants (n = 23).

Results: Results indicate significant differences in all measures of responsibility belief (interpretation of obsession and assumption of responsibility) between the OCD-only group and the two other groups.

Conclusion: The conclusion is that OCD in people with ASD is not as “genuine” as in people with only OCD, according to cognitive behavioral theory of OCD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sharjah, U.A.E.: Bentham Open, 2018
Keywords
ASD, OCD, Cognitive Profile, RAS, RIQ, Interpretation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70489 (URN)10.2174/1745017901814010304 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Saxon, L., Henriksson, S., Kvarnström, A. & Hiltunen, A. (2017). Affective changes during cognitive behavioural therapy: As measured by PANAS. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 13, 115-124, Article ID CPEMH-13-115.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective changes during cognitive behavioural therapy: As measured by PANAS
2017 (English)In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, ISSN 1745-0179, E-ISSN 1745-0179, Vol. 13, p. 115-124, article id CPEMH-13-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham open, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65446 (URN)10.2174/1745017901713010115 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Anclair, M., Hjärthag, F. & Hiltunen, A. (2017). Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for health-related quality of life: Comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions: A pilot feasibility study. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 13(1), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for health-related quality of life: Comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions: A pilot feasibility study
2017 (English)In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, ISSN 1745-0179, E-ISSN 1745-0179, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research on parents of children with chronic conditions has shown that this parent group frequently suffers from psychological problems such as deteriorating life quality and stress-related disorders. Objective: The present feasibility study focuses on Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) and life satisfaction of parents of children with chronic conditions. Method: The study was conducted using a repeated measures design and applied either group-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT; n = 10) or a group-based mindfulness programme (MF; n = 9). The study participants were wait-listed for six months. Results:The results indicate improvements for participants in both treatment groups regarding certain areas of HRQOL and life satisfaction. After eight group therapy sessions, parents in the two treatment groups significantly improved their Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores as well as their scores on the mental subscales Vitality, Social functioning, Role emotional and Mental health. In addition, some of the physical subscales, Role physical, Bodily pain and General health, showed considerable improvement for the MF group. When testing for clinical significance by comparing the samples with mean values of a norm population, the MCS scores were significantly lower at pre-measurements, but no significant differences were observed post-measurement. For the Physical component summary (PCS) scores, a significantly higher score was observed at post-measurement when compared to the norm population. Moreover, the results indicate improvement in life satisfaction regarding Spare time, Relation to child and Relation to partner. Conclusion: The study concludes that CBT and mindfulness may have a positive effect on areas of HRQOL and life satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sharjah, U.A.E: Bentham Open, 2017
Keywords
Cognitive behavioural therapy, Mindfulness, Parents of disabled children, Health-related quality of life, Life satisfaction
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-47704 (URN)10.2174/1745017901713010001 (DOI)28217146 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-24 Created: 2017-01-24 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, S., Eriksson, L. & Hiltunen, A. (2017). Evaluation of the Cognitive Intervention Programme "A New Direction" Targeting Young Offenders in Sweden. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 18(2), 176-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of the Cognitive Intervention Programme "A New Direction" Targeting Young Offenders in Sweden
2017 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, ISSN 1404-3858, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 176-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Criminality, thinking patterns, sense of coherence, PICTS, SOC-13, cognitive intervention
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48171 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2017.1307545 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-03-17 Created: 2017-03-17 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Stark, V. & Hiltunen, A. J. (2016). Affect at the different phases of cognitive behavioral therapy: An evaluation of psychotherapy provided by candidates. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 57(1), 36-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affect at the different phases of cognitive behavioral therapy: An evaluation of psychotherapy provided by candidates
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Positive affect, negative affect, PANAS, candidate therapists, cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38953 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12267 (DOI)000372356400005 ()
Available from: 2016-01-04 Created: 2016-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, S., Anclair, M. & Hiltunen, A. J. (2016). Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy on health-related quality of life: An evaluation of therapies provided by trainee therapists. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 57(3), 215-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy on health-related quality of life: An evaluation of therapies provided by trainee therapists
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study was carried out to examine the treatment effect of cognitive behavioral therapy provided by trainee therapists at a university clinic, focusing on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) optimism and symptoms. The study was conducted through a repeated measures design and included a treatment group (n = 21), which received cognitive behavioral therapy for an average of 10.7 therapy sessions and a control group (n = 14), that was put on a wait list for 8.6 weeks on average. After treatment, the treatment group improved significantly concerning general health (p = 0.028) and optimism (p = 0.027). In addition, clients improved in several areas within mental health and displayed some reduction in anxiety symptoms. Concurrently, the results also indicated some improvement within the control group, which may have been caused by the initial therapeutic contact, expectancy effects or spontaneous remission. The study concluded that cognitive behavioral therapy provided by trainee therapists may have a positive effect on areas within HRQOL and optimism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Cognitive behavioral therapy; health-related quality of life; optimism; trainee therapists
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41143 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12291 (DOI)000379940100005 ()
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-08-09Bibliographically approved
Ekman, E. & Hiltunen, A. J. (2015). Modified CBT using visualization for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), anxiety and avoidance behavior: A quasi-experimental open pilot study. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(6), 641-648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modified CBT using visualization for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), anxiety and avoidance behavior: A quasi-experimental open pilot study
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 641-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons Ltd.: , 2015
Keywords
ASD, anxiety, modified CBT, visualization, mindblindness.
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38395 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12255 (DOI)000365031100007 ()26565732 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-14 Created: 2015-11-14 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7453-5399

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