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Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Söderström, S., Hiltunen, A., Eriksson, L. & Lappalainen, R. (2024). Salutogenesis as a Mediator in Decreased Criminal Thinking: An Evaluation of Cognitive Programs for Juvenile and Adult Offenders. Journal of Forensic Psychology Research and Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salutogenesis as a Mediator in Decreased Criminal Thinking: An Evaluation of Cognitive Programs for Juvenile and Adult Offenders
2024 (English)In: Journal of Forensic Psychology Research and Practice, ISSN 2473-2850, E-ISSN 2473-2842Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study is based on two previous studies that showed a post-treatment decrease in total criminal thinking (PICTS) and an increase in total sense of coherence (SOC) among youths and adults. The current study investigated whether these interventions changed the sub-scales of PICTS and SOC, and whether an increase in SOC would mediate a decrease in PICTS. Among both groups, the mean value of the sub-factors of PICTS decreased by the interventions, and increased for SOC sub-factors meaningfulness and manageability. Only among the adults, the increase in total sense of coherence and the sub-factor of manageability mediated the decrease of criminal thinking. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2024
Keywords
adolescent, adult, article, cognition, cognitive therapy, controlled study, female, human, juvenile, male, offender, sense of coherence, therapy, thinking
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-98642 (URN)10.1080/24732850.2024.2310619 (DOI)001155907300001 ()2-s2.0-85184233591 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-27 Created: 2024-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, R., Lappalainen, P. & Hiltunen, A. (2022). Effects of an Online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Intervention on Children's Quality of Life. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 31, 1079-1093
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of an Online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Intervention on Children's Quality of Life
2022 (English)In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 31, p. 1079-1093Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examined if an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)-based online intervention for parents had indirect effects on their children's quality of life mediated by changes in parental well-being, psychological flexibility and mindfulness skills. Participants were 74 adults, who either received an ACT-based guided online intervention or were allocated to the wait list control group, and their children (n = 66) who had type 1 diabetes or functional disabilities. Structural equation modeling (SEM) and a bias-corrected bootstrap approach were applied to examine the indirect effects of the treatment on children's quality of life through changes in parents' well-being and psychological processes involving psychological flexibility, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness skills. Children's quality of life was assessed both by self-reports and parents' evaluations. Significant indirect effects on children's quality of life were found through improvements in parental well-being and mindfulness skills. The intervention had significant indirect effects on parents' evaluations of their children's quality of life concerning family and other social relationships, as well as on physical well-being. In regard to children's self-reported quality of life, the intervention had significant indirect effects on self-esteem, family relations, emotional well-being, and functioning at school/kindergarten. The results indicate that it is beneficial for children's quality of life to improve parents' ability to describe their experiences, being non-reactive to one's inner experiences and acting with awareness as well as cognitive defusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Children's quality of life, Parental well-being, Acceptance and commitment therapy, Online intervention
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-88753 (URN)10.1007/s10826-022-02234-z (DOI)000749143200003 ()2-s2.0-85123603195 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-25 Created: 2022-02-25 Last updated: 2022-04-21Bibliographically approved
Ekman, E., Hiltunen, A. & Gustafsson, H. (2021). Do athletes have more of a cognitive profile with ADHD criteria than non-athletes?. Sports, 9(5), Article ID 61.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do athletes have more of a cognitive profile with ADHD criteria than non-athletes?
2021 (English)In: Sports, E-ISSN 2075-4663, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study investigates the possibility that athletes have more parallel ADHD symptoms than non-athletes. High-level youth sport athletes were compared with non-athletes in leisure time (i.e., sport) and in the school in ADHD symptoms. Athletes and students were evaluated by a trained psychotherapist using Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) on activities at school and during activities in leisure/sports time. They also filled in the Autism Spectrum Questionnaire (AQ) as a self-report assessment. Results showed significant differences in ASRS-scores for athletes in school and in their sport, with high scores in school and low scores in sport. No differences were found in AQ between the groups. The findings indicate that many athletes might display a cognitive profile of parallel of ADHD criteria. Future research needs to further investigate potential benefits of the cognitive profile in athletes and how they handle different contexts including sport and school settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71859 (URN)10.3390/sports9050061 (DOI)000654546200001 ()2-s2.0-85108162894 (Scopus ID)
Note

Artikeln ingick som manuskript i Ekmans (2019) doktorsavhandling  Strengths and Weaknesses of the Cognitive Profiles of Autism and ADHD from a Cognitive Behavioral Perspective: Treatment, Prevention and the Understanding of the Comorbidity

Available from: 2019-04-17 Created: 2019-04-17 Last updated: 2022-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, R., Lappalainen, P. & Hiltunen, A. (2020). Mediators of change in online acceptance and commitment therapy for psychological symptoms of parents of children with chronic conditions: An investigation of change processes. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 15, 123-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediators of change in online acceptance and commitment therapy for psychological symptoms of parents of children with chronic conditions: An investigation of change processes
2020 (English)In: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, ISSN 2212-1447, Vol. 15, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Psychology, Pliability, Psychological inflexibility
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-76619 (URN)10.1016/j.jcbs.2019.11.010 (DOI)000514809200014 ()2-s2.0-85076931266 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Värmland, c2015/327
Available from: 2020-01-30 Created: 2020-01-30 Last updated: 2020-05-08Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, R., Lappalainen, P., Kaipainen, K., Carlstedt, F., Anclair, M. & Hiltunen, A. (2019). Effectiveness of a web-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention for wellbeing of parents whose children have chronic conditions: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 13, 94-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of a web-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention for wellbeing of parents whose children have chronic conditions: A randomized controlled trial
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, ISSN 2212-1447, Vol. 13, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75029 (URN)10.1016/j.jcbs.2019.07.004 (DOI)000483320600011 ()
Available from: 2019-10-02 Created: 2019-10-02 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Anclair, M., Lappalainen, R., Muotka, J. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(1), 389-396
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Parents of children with chronic conditions often experience a crisis with serious mental health problems for themselves as a consequence. The healthcare focus is on the children; however, the parents often worry about their children's health and future but are seldom offered any counselling or guidance.

Aim

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two group-based behavioural interventions on stress and burnout among parents of children with chronic conditions.

Design, participants and setting

After a waiting list control period (n = 28), parents were offered either a cognitive behavioural (CBT, n = 10) or a mindfulness program (MF, n = 9).

Results

Both interventions decreased significantly stress and burnout. The within-group effect sizes were large in both interventions (CBT, g = 1.28–1.64; MF, g = 1.25–2.20).

Conclusions

Hence, the results of this pilot study show that treating a group using either CBT or mindfulness can be an efficient intervention for reducing stress levels and burnout in parents of children with chronic conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
stress, care giving, chronic illness, cognitive, behaviour therapy, mindfulness, nursing models, burn-out, parents of children with chronic conditions
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48332 (URN)10.1111/scs.12473 (DOI)000426524200040 ()
Available from: 2017-04-21 Created: 2017-04-21 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, S., Eriksson, L. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle. Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, 19, 204-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Criminality, thinking patterns and treatment effects: Evaluation of the Swedish cognitive intervention programme ‘new challenges’ targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle
2018 (English)In: Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention, ISSN 1404-3858, E-ISSN 1651-2340, Vol. 19, p. 204-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cognitive intervention programme 'New Challenges' targeting adult men with a criminal lifestyle was evaluated in a pilot study. The participants were divided into a cognitive treatment group (n = 32) and a control group (n = 11). In the control group, six participants had no treatment and five participated in 12-step treatment. The participants were measured pre and post using the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS), the abridged version of sense of coherence (SOC), Positive and Negative Affect Scale, and Bergström's quality of programme delivery (QPD). The results of the treatment group showed that criminal thinking patterns dropped significantly from high values to close to normal level. SOC and positive affect increased significantly in the treatment group. Both SOC and positive affect showed positive correlation with QPD. Regarding the possible influence of the 12-step treatment, there was no difference in the control group between participants receiving 12-step treatment and those not receiving treatment. The main conclusion is that the cognitive treatment programme 'New Challenges' can contribute to reduced criminal thinking and increased SOC and positive affect, which may prove to be important precursors of reduced criminality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Criminality, crime prevention, PICTS, SOC, PANAS, client satisfaction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67398 (URN)10.1080/14043858.2018.1513202 (DOI)
Note

Ingick i licentiatuppsatsen som manuskript med titeln: Evaluation of the Swedish Cognitive Intervention Programme "New Challenges" Targeting Adult Men with a Criminal Lifestyle

Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Sairanen, E., Lappalainen, P. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions. PLOS ONE, 13(7), Article ID e0201155.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological inflexibility explains distress in parents whose children have chronic conditions
2018 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness have all been associated with psychological disorders and well-being. This study investigates whether they predict psychological distress, i.e., symptoms of burnout, depression, stress and anxiety, in parents of children with chronic conditions. We hypothesized that these factors would exhibit a large degree of common variance, and that when compared to mindfulness and defusion, experiential avoidance on its own would predict a larger proportion of unique variance. 75 parents of children with chronic conditions having burnout symptoms who participated in an intervention study completed measures of burnout, stress, anxiety, depression, experiential avoidance, cognitive defusion, and mindfulness at the beginning of the intervention study (baseline). We ran several regression analyses to assess the predictive ability of these different constructs. Experiential avoidance on its own accounted for 28-48% of the variance in different psychological symptoms. Cognitive defusion and mindfulness did not make a significant contribution to explaining burnout, stress and anxiety, but cognitive defusion contributed to explaining depression. The results confirmed our hypothesis, supporting research on the importance of psychological flexibility as a central factor in understanding the occurrence of psychological distress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
Keywords
COMMITMENT THERAPY, MINDFULNESS QUESTIONNAIRE, INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, EXPERIENTIAL AVOIDANCE, CONSTRUCT-VALIDITY, ACCEPTANCE, BURNOUT
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68794 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0201155 (DOI)000439942500085 ()30044852 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050651568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-17 Created: 2018-08-17 Last updated: 2022-06-29Bibliographically approved
Ekman, E. & Hiltunen, A. (2018). The Cognitive Profile of Persons with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 14, 304-311, Article ID CPEMH-14-304.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cognitive Profile of Persons with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
2018 (English)In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, ISSN 1745-0179, E-ISSN 1745-0179, Vol. 14, p. 304-311, article id CPEMH-14-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is often comorbid with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). But to what extent can obsessional symptoms in individuals with ASD be considered “genuinely” comorbid OCD – or are there other mechanisms that are related to ASD? Which mechanisms in OCD with and without ASD share common features? People with ASD have a cognitive profile characterized by “mindblindness”; the antecedent is often referred to in terms of not knowing how to perform or behave and this is the cause of discomfort. This raises the question whether individuals with ASD and comorbid OCD share the same cognitive elements of responsibility interpretation and the same fear of causing harm as individuals who merely have OCD.

Objective: The aim of the present study is therefore to evaluate the extent of responsibility interpretation in individuals with OCD alone compared with people experiencing OCD in the context of ASD.

Methods: Two instruments, the Responsibility Attitude Scale (RAS) and the Responsibility Interpretations Questionnaire (RIQ), were administered to three groups of participants: (i) individuals diagnosed with OCD (n = 32); (ii) individuals with ASD and OCD (n = 19); and (iii) non-clinical control participants (n = 23).

Results: Results indicate significant differences in all measures of responsibility belief (interpretation of obsession and assumption of responsibility) between the OCD-only group and the two other groups.

Conclusion: The conclusion is that OCD in people with ASD is not as “genuine” as in people with only OCD, according to cognitive behavioral theory of OCD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sharjah, U.A.E.: Bentham Open, 2018
Keywords
ASD, OCD, Cognitive Profile, RAS, RIQ, Interpretation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70489 (URN)10.2174/1745017901814010304 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2019-04-17Bibliographically approved
Saxon, L., Henriksson, S., Kvarnström, A. & Hiltunen, A. (2017). Affective changes during cognitive behavioural therapy: As measured by PANAS. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 13, 115-124, Article ID CPEMH-13-115.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective changes during cognitive behavioural therapy: As measured by PANAS
2017 (English)In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, ISSN 1745-0179, E-ISSN 1745-0179, Vol. 13, p. 115-124, article id CPEMH-13-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous researches have indicated that self-reported positive affect and negative affect is changing in a healthy direction during Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).Objective:The aim of the present study was to examine how affective personality is related to psychopathology before and after CBT.

Method: A group of clients (n = 73) was measured before and after CBT, differentiated by their problem areas at pre-therapy (i.e., depressive, anxious and mixed).

Results: After therapy, clients experienced higher positive affect (p < .02, d=0.66), lower negative affect (p < .001, d=0.98) and there was a significant change in the distribution of affective personality regardless of problem area, χ2 = 8.41, df = 3, two-tailed p = .04, 99% CI [0.03, 0.04]. The change in the distribution was largest for the two most relevant personality types, self-actualization and self-destructive affective personality.

Conclusion: Results indicate that CBT can achieve changes in affect and affective personality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham open, 2017
Keywords
Affect, Affective personality, Cognitive behavioural therapy, PANAS, Psychopathology, Hypotheses
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65446 (URN)10.2174/1745017901713010115 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-19 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2024-02-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7453-5399

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