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MacKenzie, Robert, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-8182
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Publications (10 of 48) Show all publications
MacKenzie, R. & Lucio, M. M. (2019). Regulation, migration and the implications for industrial relations. Journal of Industrial Relations, 61(2), 176-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulation, migration and the implications for industrial relations
2019 (English)In: Journal of Industrial Relations, ISSN 0022-1856, E-ISSN 1472-9296, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 176-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The debate on migration has extended the scope of industrial relations research and brought questions of regulation to the centre. We suggest that there is a mutuality to the relationship between the debates around migration and regulation within the industrial relations literature: the study of migration has stimulated a new set of debates within industrial relations that allow us to reconsider issues of regulation; in turn, the study of regulation offers a useful perspective on issues relating to migration. The article applies an analytical framework based on the interplay of regulatory spaces and actors to the study of international migration. The framework offers a dynamic approach to mapping the wide range of actors involved in the regulation of migration and the boundaries between regulatory spaces, which may be fluid and contested. Through applying this framework, industrial relations issues relating to migration are located within a wider view of both regulation and the international movement of people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Asylum seeker, atypical employment, migrant labour, migration, refugee, regulation, regulatory actors, regulatory spaces, state, trade unions
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72122 (URN)10.1177/0022185618814280 (DOI)000466754200002 ()
Available from: 2019-05-23 Created: 2019-05-23 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
McLachlan, C. J., MacKenzie, R. & Greenwood, I. (2019). The Role of the Steelworker Occupational Community in the Internalization of Industrial Restructuring: The ‘Layering Up’ of Collective Proximal and Distal Experiences. Sociology, 53(5), 916-930
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of the Steelworker Occupational Community in the Internalization of Industrial Restructuring: The ‘Layering Up’ of Collective Proximal and Distal Experiences
2019 (English)In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 916-930Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the relationship between occupational community and restructuring at a UK steelworks. Through historic and contemporary experiences, restructuring has become an internalized feature of the steelworker identity. Zittoun and Gillespie’s framework of proximal and distal experiences is adapted to analyse the internalization process. The article argues that experiential resources associated with restructuring are transmitted via the occupational community, forming a part of a collective memory of workplace change. These experiences relate to the historical precedence of restructuring, the role of trade unions in accepting the inevitability of downsizing and prior personal and vicarious experiences of redundancy. The findings build on debates around the determinants of an occupational community, highlighting the role of ‘marginality’ and how experiences of restructuring bind steelworkers to a broader community of fate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
collective, community of fate, deindustrialization, downsizing, internalization, occupational community, occupational identity, redundancy, restructuring, steel industry
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71759 (URN)10.1177/0038038519836850 (DOI)000485289800008 ()2-s2.0-85063329221 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved
MacKenzie, R. & Marks, A. (2018). Older Workers and Occupational Identity in the Telecommunications Industry: Navigating Employment Transitions through the Life Course. Work, Employment and Society, 33(1), 39-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Workers and Occupational Identity in the Telecommunications Industry: Navigating Employment Transitions through the Life Course
2018 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 39-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article examines the relationship between restructuring and work-based identity among older workers, exploring occupational identity, occupational community and their roles in navigating transitions in the life course. Based on working-life biographical interviews with late career and retired telecoms engineers, the article explores the role of occupational identity in dealing with change prior to and following the end of careers at BT, the UK’s national telecommunications provider. Restructuring and perpetual organizational change undermined key aspects of the engineering occupational identity, inspiring many to seek alternative employment outside BT. For older workers, some seeking bridge employment in the transition to retirement, the occupational community not only served as a mechanism for finding work but also provided a sustained collective identity resource. Distinctively, the research points to a dialectical relationship between occupational identity and the navigation of change as opposed to the former simply facilitating the latter. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
bridge employment, identity, life course, occupation, occupational community, occupational identity, older workers, organizational identity, retirement
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67103 (URN)10.1177/0950017018760212 (DOI)000458198400003 ()2-s2.0-85045038415 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-20 Created: 2018-04-20 Last updated: 2019-02-21
Ciupijus, Z., MacKenzie, R. & Forde, C. (2018). The worker branch in Yorkshire as a way of organising Polish migrants: exploring the process of carving out diasporic spaces within the trade union structure. Journal of ethnic and migration studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The worker branch in Yorkshire as a way of organising Polish migrants: exploring the process of carving out diasporic spaces within the trade union structure
2018 (English)In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

While post-2004 Polish labour migration to the UK was underpinned by diasporic spaces instrumental in facilitating social and labour market adjustments, the institutions of the host society such as trade unions also sought to establish links with migrants. The analysis of interactions between UK unions and EU migrants focused on organising strategies and specific provisions such as English language learning. However, the discussion tended to ignore the impacts of diasporic influences, from ethnicity and native languages of migrants to the outcomes of migrant worker organising. Drawing on ethnographic and qualitative data, this paper discusses how Polishness, in its ethnic, historic and linguistic manifestations, has affected the internal dynamics of a migrant worker organisation created by a major UK trade union. The explicit acknowledgement of diasporic particularities of post-2004 Polish migrants not only enabled labour organising activities but also shaped the migrant worker organisation from within. The strength of diasporic influences on one hand and the chosen form of union organising on the other created conditions for the development of diasporic spaces within the institution of the host society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Diasporic influences, language, Polish migrants, UK trade unions
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70348 (URN)10.1080/1369183X.2018.1538771 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055547474 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Holth, L., Bergman, A. & MacKenzie, R. (2017). Gender, availability and dual emancipation in the Swedish ICT sector. Work, Employment and Society, 31(2), 230-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender, availability and dual emancipation in the Swedish ICT sector
2017 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 230-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Set in the context of the Swedish state’s agenda of dual emancipation for women and men, the article shows how a global ICT consultancy company’s formal gender equality goal is undermined by competing demands. Employing the concept of availability, in preference to work–life balance, the research found women opted out of roles requiring high degrees of spatial and temporal availability for work, in favour of roles more easily combined with family responsibilities. Such choices led to poor career development, plus the loss of technological expertise and confidence.These outcomes were at odds with the company’s gender equality aims, as well as government objectives to make it easier for women and men to combine work and family, and increase the number of women within ICT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
availability, dual emancipation, gendered division of labour, ICT, IT consultants, work and family, work–life balance
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38003 (URN)10.1177/0950017016651378 (DOI)000397933200002 ()
Note

This article was published as manuscript in Line Holths doctoral thesis.

Available from: 2015-09-22 Created: 2015-09-22 Last updated: 2018-11-09Bibliographically approved
MacKenzie, R., Marks, A. & Morgan, K. (2017). Technology, affordances and occupational identity amongst older telecommunications engineers: from living machines to black-boxes. Sociology, 51(4), 732-748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technology, affordances and occupational identity amongst older telecommunications engineers: from living machines to black-boxes
2017 (English)In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 732-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the relationship between technology and occupational identity based on working-life biographical interviews with older telecommunications engineers. In the construction of their own working-life biographical narratives, participants attached great importance to the technology with which they worked. The article contends that workers’ relationship with technology can be more nuanced than either the sociology of technology literature or the sociology of work literature accommodates. Adopting the concept of affordances, it is argued that the physical nature of earlier electromechanical technology afforded engineers the opportunity to ‘fix’ things through the skilled application of tools and act as autonomous custodians of ‘living’ machines: factors that were inherent to their occupational identity. However, the change to digital technology denied the affordances to apply hands-on skill and undermined key elements of the engineering occupational identity. Rather than simply reflecting the nostalgic romanticizing of the past, the biographies captured deterioration in the material realities of work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Affordances, anthropomorphism, biographies, engineers, labour process, nostalgia, occupational identity
National Category
Social Sciences Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-46287 (URN)10.1177/0038038515616352 (DOI)000405846000002 ()
Available from: 2016-09-28 Created: 2016-09-28 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Martinez Lucio, M. & MacKenzie, R. (2017). The state and the regulation of work and employment: theoretical contributions, forgotten lessons and new forms of engagement. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28(21), 2983-3002
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The state and the regulation of work and employment: theoretical contributions, forgotten lessons and new forms of engagement
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, ISSN 0958-5192, E-ISSN 1466-4399, Vol. 28, no 21, p. 2983-3002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Within the work and employment literature there has been a tendency to conflate the concept of regulation with the legislative role of the state and the enforcement of rules through various state agencies. Yet there has been limited engagement with the question of the state and its role in more abstract terms. There has been a historic tendency to view the state as a coherent, unitary actor - a tendency repeated by various theoretical perspectives. More recently, work and employment debates on regulation have too often reduced the question of the state to a one dimensional focus on its various functions: the state as legislator; as employer; or in terms of its coercive apparatus. There has been relatively limited engagement with the role of the state in more conceptual terms. Drawing on contributions from adjacent disciplines, the paper argues that the role of the state needs to be addressed at various levels of abstraction - an approach that has been increasingly overlooked in work and employment debates. Understanding the role of the state and its regulatory function requires a nuanced analysis of the various spaces and actors involved the regulatory process. In turn, such analysis needs to be located in terms of broader socio-economic configurations so as to avoid a narrow focus on institutionalism, and a piecemeal, fragmented view of the state. While the paper draws primarily on the UK for illustration, the intention is that the argument has theoretical generalisability beyond this context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
State, regulation, work, employment, HRM, employment relations
National Category
Work Sciences Political Science
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66191 (URN)10.1080/09585192.2017.1363796 (DOI)000423300500008 ()
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2018-06-21Bibliographically approved
Cook, H., MacKenzie, R. & Forde, C. (2017). Union partnership as a facilitator to HRM: Improving implementation through oppositional engagement. International Journal of Human Resource Management
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Union partnership as a facilitator to HRM: Improving implementation through oppositional engagement
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Human Resource Management, ISSN 0958-5192, E-ISSN 1466-4399Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This paper provides a nuanced insight into the workplace level interactions between a union and HRM systems within a union-management partnership arrangement. Soft outcomes of HRM systems typically suffer from compromised implementation by managers struggling to balance competing operational priorities, but we show how a union limits this poor implementation. Qualitative and documentary data were retrieved from a major UK retailer and a trade union to examine how union activity interacts with HRM delivery. Firstly, union communication systems enhanced or replaced company systems of employee voice. Secondly, union activity policed management implementation of HRM practices to limit their subjugation to short-term productivity increases, improving outcomes for employees and the HRM system for the company. These outcomes were achieved through oppositional engagement within the context of partnership, which points towards a persisting and productive pluralism within the cooperative rhetoric.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
Keywords
Union partnership, HRM implementation, retail sector, pluralism
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66336 (URN)10.1080/09585192.2017.1399431 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Cook, H., MacKenzie, R. & Forde, C. (2016). HRM and performance: the vulnerability of soft HRM practices during recession and retrenchment. Human Resource Management Journal, 26(4), 557-571
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HRM and performance: the vulnerability of soft HRM practices during recession and retrenchment
2016 (English)In: Human Resource Management Journal, ISSN 0954-5395, E-ISSN 1748-8583, ISSN 0954-5395, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 557-571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This multi-method case explores how change in HRM implementation can impact performance metrics in a recessionary climate. Qualitative HR outcome data are mapped against financial metrics to explore adoption of hard-line HRM practices in a major UK retailer. Despite record profits throughout the recession, the organisation responded strategically to worsening conditions in the labour market, firstly to maintain operational flexibility, but then to opportunistically enlarge jobs and intensify work to help achieve immediate gains in financial metrics, including a gain of 37 per cent in profit per employee over 3 years. These gains were achieved by derailing commitment-based approaches to HRM, pointing towards the vulnerability of soft HRM systems during times of austerity or retrenchment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
financial performance, retail, recession, commitment
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-63887 (URN)10.1111/1748-8583.12122 (DOI)000393027500012 ()
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Ivarsson, L., Larsson, P. & MacKenzie, R. (2016). Management’s moral relativity regarding personal activities on company time. In: : . Paper presented at The 34th International Labour Process Conference "Working Revolutions: Revolutionising Work", 4th -6th April 2016, Berlin,Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management’s moral relativity regarding personal activities on company time
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When people are at work they are expected to work and not spend time on other things. But people do not engage exclusively in work; they also engage in a variety of non-work related activities, which Eddy et al. (2010) choose to term ‘personal activities on company time’ or PACT. What personal activities people engage in is determined by what they consider urgent in one way or another, and what is possible to do at the specific workplace (Ivarsson & Larsson, forthcoming). So far, most studies on this subject have focused on subordinated personnel (Lim 2002) but mid- and top-level managers also engage in PACT (Schou Andreassen et al. 2014; Ivarsson & Larsson 2015). However, management attitudes to PACT vary significantly between their own activities and the behaviour of their subordinates. Based on in-depth interviews with 20 high-level managers from different sectors and industries in Sweden, the paper explores the differences in attitude and presentation of PACT.

We explore the incidence and rationale presented for respective actions of workers and managers,    which betrays an underlying moralising theme around work ethics that echoes back through the historic concerns of the Labour Process debate. Since the days of Taylor (1911), management have moralized about the personality and the attitude among workers – their inherited laziness and their never-ending tendency to ‘soldier’ – which has led to a perceived need to keep on monitoring and controlling employees by various means. Employees who, in one way or another, withholds working capacity – for example by engagement in some non-work related activity – are believed to cause financial loss for the organization (Self & Self 2014) and are also believed to influence overall work ethic in a negative way (Kamp & Brooks 1991).

 

From the data, managers engage quite extensively in personal activities on official work time. Even though employees and managers may have similar reasons for engagement in personal activities, the managers believe that there is a big difference between the two.  The managers’ general perception is that work time should be devoted only to work. They do not approve when an employee engage in any other activity than work; to engage is PACT is presented as “stealing” time, and indicative of a flawed work ethic. Nevertheless, when managers themselves engage quite extensively in personal activities on official work time, this is presented as a benefit of an inherently good work ethic, or “borrowing” time based on a capacity for compensatory calculation. Even in cases where a narrow band of legitimate PACT activities for workers were tolerated, this compared to managements’ lack of need to justify their engagement in a near limitless range of non-work activities. There has been a lot of focus on blurring of work and non-work roles for managers and the need for boundary management (Rothbard et al, 2005). The managers in this study presented the inversion of this logic with the assumption of a lack of competing needs for non-managerial workers and any blurring of the boundary being regarded as “soldiering”.

Keywords
Personal activities on company time, organizational misbehaviour, management, moral
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41704 (URN)
Conference
The 34th International Labour Process Conference "Working Revolutions: Revolutionising Work", 4th -6th April 2016, Berlin,Germany
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-0730
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2016-07-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-8182

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