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MacKenzie, Robert, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-8182
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Valizade, D., Cook, H., Forde, C. & MacKenzie, R. (2023). Do union strategic influence, job security and the industrial relations climate matter for the adoption of high performance work systems?. Journal of Organizational Effectiveness
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do union strategic influence, job security and the industrial relations climate matter for the adoption of high performance work systems?
2023 (English)In: Journal of Organizational Effectiveness, ISSN 2051-6614, E-ISSN 2051-6622Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The paper aims to explore the role of union strategic influence on the adoption of High Performance Work Systems (HPWS) in organisations and examines how the effects of job security and then in turn the industrial relations climate, mediate this relationship in a serial manner. Design/methodology/approach: The research analyses an original quantitative survey of union negotiators and representatives in 382 workplaces in England. The analysis employs structural equation modelling techniques to examine the relationships between union influence, job security, industrial relations climate and HPWS. Findings: Union strategic influence has a positive effect on the take up of HPWS in unionised workplaces. Job security and the industrial relations climate demonstrate a serial mediation effect between union strategic influence and the take up of HPWS: union strategic influence has a positive effect on job security, which in turn positively impacts the industrial relations climate, thereby increasing the likelihood of the adoption of HPWS. The findings for the industrial relations climate are particularly strong. Practical implications: Findings suggest that organisations will benefit from focussing on the development of positive industrial relations, where unions have genuine strategic influence, because this maximises the likelihood that HPWS can be adopted and sustained. Originality/value: The paper provides a novel focus on the take up of HPWS within unionised workplaces. It focusses on the role of union strategic influence and the mediating effects of job security and the industrial relations climate, which are contextual factors that have been underexplored in the HPWS literature to date.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
High-performance work systems, Unions, Industrial relations climate, Strategic influence, Serial mediation
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96752 (URN)10.1108/JOEPP-09-2022-0278 (DOI)001106099200001 ()2-s2.0-85169560111 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-19 Created: 2023-09-19 Last updated: 2023-12-21Bibliographically approved
Basahal, A., Forde, C. & MacKenzie, R. (2023). Labour market localisation policies and organizational responses: an analysis of the aims and effects of the Saudi Nitaqat reforms. International Journal of Organizational Analysis, 31(4), 1024-1036
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labour market localisation policies and organizational responses: an analysis of the aims and effects of the Saudi Nitaqat reforms
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Organizational Analysis, ISSN 1934-8835, E-ISSN 1758-8561, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 1024-1036Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to understand the degree to which the intended outcomes of Saudi's Nitaqat labour market policy corresponds to the actual responses from private companies. Second, to investigate how these gaps between policy intentions and actual outcomes have informed recent changes to Nitaqat policy. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses a qualitative approach with a case study design and thematic analysis procedures. Data were obtained from the following three sources: semi-structured interviews completed during the early stage of Nitaqat in 2013-2014 with nine policymakers and 44 key stakeholders from six private Saudi companies; policy documents and gray literature on the aims and effects of the Nitaqat program; and available peer-reviewed literature on the subject. Findings This paper sets out and analyses the following four main goals of Nitaqat: First, to increase the Saudi national employment rate, second, increase company efficiency, third, improve human resource capabilities, and fourth, increase female labour participation. This paper reveals that although Nitaqat has certainly resulted in a positive change in some of these areas, in other areas, there remain gaps between the intentions and the actual effects of Nitaqat. This paper analyses recent changes to Nitaqat and argues that further changes may be needed to achieve the full goals of Nitaqat. Originality/value This paper's originality lies in its analysis of the aims of labour market policies and organisational responses. It highlights the reasons for disconnections between the policy aims and organisational practices and explores how policymakers react and respond to these implementation gaps.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2023
Keywords
Saudi Arabia, Localisation, Nitaqat, Labour market regulations, Organisational responses, Policy outcomes
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-85995 (URN)10.1108/IJOA-03-2021-2681 (DOI)000692760500001 ()2-s2.0-85114194390 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-09-22 Created: 2021-09-22 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Scholz, F., Oliver, L., Tomlinson, J., MacKenzie, R. & Ingold, J. (2023). Old norms in the new normal: Exploring and resisting the rise of the ideal pandemic worker. Gender, Work and Organization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Old norms in the new normal: Exploring and resisting the rise of the ideal pandemic worker
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2023 (English)In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
care, COVID-19 pandemic, ideal worker, inequality regimes, re-entrenchment
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-97288 (URN)10.1111/gwao.13071 (DOI)001079588600001 ()2-s2.0-85173446139 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-11-23Bibliographically approved
MacKenzie, R. & McLachlan, C. J. (2023). Restructuring, Redeployment and Job Churning within Internal Labour Markets. Work, Employment and Society, 37(6), 1480-1496
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Restructuring, Redeployment and Job Churning within Internal Labour Markets
2023 (English)In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1480-1496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the phenomenon of recurrent internal redeployment, through a case study of restructuring at a UK based steel firm. While redeployment reflected one of the key functions of the traditional internal labour market at SteelCo, frequent restructuring events meant some workers experienced redeployment on a recurrent basis. For these workers the experience of repeated redeployment was analogous to churning in and out of jobs on the external labour market. Adapting this term to internal organisational processes, the article presents a new way of analysing recurrent redeployment through the formulation of the concept of Internal Labour Market Churn. This new contribution to internal labour market theory highlights problems with human capital development, career progression and in-work insecurity associated with internal churning, which tarnishes the sense of mutual commitment traditionally associated with and engendered by internal labour markets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
churning, internal labour markets, job insecurity, redeployment, redundancy, restructuring, steel
National Category
Work Sciences Business Administration
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-90119 (URN)10.1177/09500170221080389 (DOI)000798503100001 ()2-s2.0-85130424128 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-07 Created: 2022-06-07 Last updated: 2023-12-11Bibliographically approved
Valizade, D., Cook, H., Forde, C. & MacKenzie, R. (2022). Are bargaining concessions inevitable in recessions?: An empirical investigation into union bargaining priorities and trade-offs of pay rises for job security. Employee relations, 44(6), 1485-1503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are bargaining concessions inevitable in recessions?: An empirical investigation into union bargaining priorities and trade-offs of pay rises for job security
2022 (English)In: Employee relations, ISSN 0142-5455, E-ISSN 1758-7069, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1485-1503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose This paper examines the extent of bargaining concessions in recession through investigating the effects of union bargaining on pay, job security and workforce composition. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on an original survey (n = 400) of workplace level trade union bargaining units in England, the authors employed latent class analysis to establish three groups of bargaining units on the basis of pay outcomes achieved. Linear regression analysis with moderation effects investigated whether pay rises at or above inflation in conjunction with shifts in bargaining priorities was associated with decreases in perceived job security and changes in the composition of the workforce. Findings Around a quarter of sampled units, concentrated mostly in decentralised bargaining units in the private sector, achieved pay rises at or above the inflation rate during an economic downturn. Pay rises at or above inflation in workplaces severely affected by recession triggered changes in bargaining priorities requiring some concessions, notably in terms of employees' job security. That said, across the sample, achieving pay rises was associated with improved perception of job security and lesser use of contingent labour. Originality/value The findings uncover a subset of bargaining units able to secure positive outcomes for workers against a hostile economic tide, whilst demonstrating that concession bargaining is not inevitable but rather contingent on the micro-environments in which union bargaining takes place.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022
Keywords
Pay rises, Real wages, Recession, Concession bargaining, Job security
National Category
Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-91510 (URN)10.1108/ER-12-2021-0550 (DOI)000822436200001 ()2-s2.0-85133665475 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-19 Created: 2022-08-19 Last updated: 2023-02-01Bibliographically approved
Örnebring, H., Van Couvering, E., MacKenzie, R. & Regin Öborn, D. (2022). The mediatization of work?: Gig apps and young workers in Sweden. In: ECREA 2022 – Electronic Book of Abstracts: . Paper presented at 9th European Communication Conference, ECREA, AARHUS, Denmark, October 19-22, 2022. (pp. 544-545). Aarhus Universitetsforlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The mediatization of work?: Gig apps and young workers in Sweden
2022 (English)In: ECREA 2022 – Electronic Book of Abstracts, Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2022, p. 544-545Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2022
Keywords
gig work, mediatization, Sweden
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-96963 (URN)978-80-908364-2-6 (ISBN)
Conference
9th European Communication Conference, ECREA, AARHUS, Denmark, October 19-22, 2022.
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2018-00261
Available from: 2023-10-11 Created: 2023-10-11 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
Regin Öborn, D. & MacKenzie, R. (2021). Getting On Or Getting Out: gigger platform relations in Swedish digital mediated basic service work. In: : . Paper presented at International Labour Process Conference 2021: ‘Security in Work? The workplace after COVID-19’ University of Greenwich on 12-14th April.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Getting On Or Getting Out: gigger platform relations in Swedish digital mediated basic service work
2021 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-86093 (URN)
Conference
International Labour Process Conference 2021: ‘Security in Work? The workplace after COVID-19’ University of Greenwich on 12-14th April
Projects
Swegig
Available from: 2021-10-04 Created: 2021-10-04 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
Regin Öborn, D. & MacKenzie, R. (2021). Lyckas eller lämna: en intervjustudie av relationen mellan giggare och tjänsteförmedlande plattformar inom svensk servicesektor. In: : . Paper presented at FALF 2021 Mälardalens högskola 14-16 juni.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lyckas eller lämna: en intervjustudie av relationen mellan giggare och tjänsteförmedlande plattformar inom svensk servicesektor
2021 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-86094 (URN)
Conference
FALF 2021 Mälardalens högskola 14-16 juni
Projects
Swegig
Available from: 2021-10-04 Created: 2021-10-04 Last updated: 2021-10-21Bibliographically approved
McLachlan, C. J., MacKenzie, R. & Greenwood, I. (2021). Victims, survivors and the emergence of 'endurers' as a reflection of shifting goals in the management of redeployment. Human Resource Management Journal, 1(2), 438-453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Victims, survivors and the emergence of 'endurers' as a reflection of shifting goals in the management of redeployment
2021 (English)In: Human Resource Management Journal, ISSN 0954-5395, E-ISSN 1748-8583, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 438-453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The victim and survivor debate conceptualises employees impacted by restructuring as one or the other. A key contribution of this study is the identification of a conceptually distinct category of employee impacted by restructuring, theendurer. Endurers are survivors who share many of the experiences of victims, occupying a space in-between the two and not easily understood as either. Endurers experience redundancy of role yet retention of employment. This creates specific needs that pose new challenges for the human resource (HR) function. Through examining the HR function's implementation of an internal redeployment strategy at SteelCo, the study reveals the displacement of substantive goals by institutional goals, and the impact this has on endurers. The analysis of endurers' experiences also offers a conceptual lens for understanding changes to the psychological contract in the context of restructuring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
downsizing, psychological contract, redeployment, redundancy, restructuring, steel industry, survivors, victims
National Category
Psychology Work Sciences
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-80042 (URN)10.1111/1748-8583.12314 (DOI)000557669100001 ()2-s2.0-85089143712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-16 Created: 2020-09-16 Last updated: 2021-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ciupijus, Z., Forde, C. & MacKenzie, R. (2020). Micro- and meso-regulatory spaces of labour mobility power: The role of ethnic and kinship networks in shaping work-related movements of post-2004 Central Eastern European migrants to the United Kingdom. Population, Space and Place, 26(5), Article ID e2300.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro- and meso-regulatory spaces of labour mobility power: The role of ethnic and kinship networks in shaping work-related movements of post-2004 Central Eastern European migrants to the United Kingdom
2020 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 26, no 5, article id e2300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

European Union (EU) enlargement in 2004 produced a multi-layered regulatory space structuring labour mobility between Central Eastern Europe and the United Kingdom. Building on a critical revaluation of the concept of labour mobility power as a phenomenon that cannot be reduced to earnings' maximisation, the paper contends that although post-2004 migration was nested in the macro-regulatory mechanism of EU freedom of movement of labour, kinship and ethnic networks constituted additional layers in regulating migrants' mobility trajectories. Drawing on migratory biographies, the analysis examines how these regulatory mechanisms shaped migrants' actions and intentions related to transnational exit, contributed in creating linkages through which migrants sought to actualise their labour power on a transnational scale, and provided directions for labour mobility power's use within the receiving country. By embedding labour mobility power within kinship (micro) and ethnic (meso) networks, this paper offers a complimentary understanding of labour mobility power that takes it beyond the homo economicus explanatory model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2020
Keywords
ethnic networks, EU labour migration, kinship networks, labour mobility power
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Working Life Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-77249 (URN)10.1002/psp.2300 (DOI)000513561700001 ()
Available from: 2020-03-12 Created: 2020-03-12 Last updated: 2020-09-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-8182

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