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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Sund, B., Bonander, C., Jakobsson, N. & Jaldell, H. (2019). Do home fire and safety checks by on-duty firefighters decrease the number of fires?: Quasi-experimental evidence from Southern Sweden. Journal of Safety Research, 70, 39-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do home fire and safety checks by on-duty firefighters decrease the number of fires?: Quasi-experimental evidence from Southern Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 70, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Fire and rescue services Syd, in the south of Sweden, started to conduct home fire and safety checks on a large scale in 2010. The goal was to reduce the damages from residential fires. Method: We estimate the effects of the intervention on the incidence of residential fires and evaluate its economic effect. We use a difference-in-kinks design to analyze time-varying intervention effects and conduct a cost–benefit analysis for the economic evaluation. Results: The results demonstrate that fires and developed fires decrease by a maximum of approximately 6% and 8% per year (assuming 100% causality)and that the intervention has positive economic effects, with the benefits estimated to be maximum 8–11 times higher than the costs. Practical applications: The results should be valuable as input when deciding whether to implement home fire and safety checks elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cost–benefit analysis, Fire prevention, Public education, Residential fires, Smoke alarms, Alarm systems, Costs, Economic analysis, Economic and social effects, Fireproofing, Fires, Housing, Smoke, Benefit analysis, Cost benefit analysis
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73332 (URN)10.1016/j.jsr.2019.04.006 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved
Grahn, T. & Jaldell, H. (2019). Households (un)willingness to perform private flood risk reduction: Results from a Swedish survey. Safety Science, 116, 127-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Households (un)willingness to perform private flood risk reduction: Results from a Swedish survey
2019 (English)In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 116, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study applies the protection motivation theory (PMT) in analysing homeowners’ flood risk perception and their risk reduction behaviour. A survey was completed by 1143 households in flood-prone residential areas in Sweden. Respondents were asked about their flood experience, their beliefs about their future private flood risk, their trust in public risk reduction and their perception of how responsibility for flood risk reduction is divided between different governmental and private institutions. This study finds that homeowners that have implemented private flood risk reduction (FRR) had to a larger extent been exposed to floods in the past and they considered public FRR to be insufficient. They also had a greater sense of responsibility and believed they had considerable knowledge on how to reduce their private flood risk. Respondents were also asked about their preferences for performing 15 specific private risk reducing measures. The most frequent answer given by homeowners was (1) they do not have the knowledge needed to evaluate the measures. (2) They have evaluated the measures and deemed that the measures will not be able to effectively reduce their private flood risk. To facilitate and exploit the flood risk reduction potential of households, this study identifies the following four areas of flood risk management that need to be better communicated to residents in vulnerable residential areas: Objective flood risk, response efficacy regarding private and public FRR measures, skills that can increase homeowners’ self-efficacy, and the actual responsibility distribution by law concerning private property flood risk reduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Flood, Protection motivation theory, Risk perception, Risk reduction, Flood control, Housing, Motivation, Risk assessment, Risk management, Surveys, Flood risk management, Flood risk reduction, Private institutions, Private property, Residential areas, Risk reductions, Self efficacy, Floods, adult, article, drug efficacy, flooding, household, human, resident, residential area, responsibility, self concept, skill, Sweden, theoretical study, trust
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71754 (URN)10.1016/j.ssci.2019.03.011 (DOI)000467669200012 ()2-s2.0-85063079890 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-05-31Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, A. & Jaldell, H. (2019). Identifying sociodemographic risk factors associated with residential fire-related fatalities: A matched case control study. Injury Prevention
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying sociodemographic risk factors associated with residential fire-related fatalities: A matched case control study
2019 (English)In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors and residential fire fatalities in Sweden. A majority of fatal fires occur in housing. An understanding of risk factors and risk groups is a must for well-Founded decisions regarding targeted prevention efforts. There is a lack of consideration of the interrelation between sociodemographic factors and fire fatalities and there is a lack of high quality large-Scale studies. Methods: In this matched case-Control study, residential fire fatalities (cases, n=850) (age above 19 years old) were identified in the national register on fatal fires. Four controls per case were randomly matched by gender and age. ORs were calculated to assess the association between different sociodemographic factors with residential fire fatalities using conditional logistic regression. Results: Having low income, receiving social allowance and receiving health-Related early retirement pension were associated with an increased risk of dying in residential fires. The results also show clearly that adults dying in residential fires to a significantly lower extent were living together with a partner, were in work, were highly educated and lived in urban areas. However, contrary to previous research, living in rented apartments appeared not to influence the risk of death. Conclusions: In this study, we show that fatalities due to residential fires in Sweden are associated with some but not all of previously published sociodemographic risk factors. The results provide valuable information that can improve the guiding and targeting of fire mortality prevention strategies in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67026 (URN)10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043062 (DOI)000446617400044 ()
Note

Artikeln ingick som manuskript i Jonssons doktorsavhandling Dödsbränder i Sverige: En analys av datakvalitet, orsaker och riskmönster.

Available from: 2018-04-17 Created: 2018-04-17 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Jaldell, H. (2019). Measuring Productive Performance Using Binary And Ordinal Output Variables: The Case of the Swedish Fire and Rescue Services. International Journal of Production Research, 57(3), 907-917
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring Productive Performance Using Binary And Ordinal Output Variables: The Case of the Swedish Fire and Rescue Services
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 907-917Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fire protection is an example of a complex production process. This study measures efficiency by constructing binary and ordinal output variables from information on residential fires in Sweden about how a fire spreads from when the fire and rescue brigade arrives to when a fire is suppressed. The motivations behind this study are that there are only a few studies trying to estimate production efficiency for fire and rescue services, that data on a more detailed level is interesting for some public services, and there is a need to be able to measure efficiency differences even if only a binary or ordinal output variable is available. Using a logit random parameter model, the random effects are interpreted as efficiency differences. The conclusions are that fire and rescue services with a more flexible fire organisation with first response persons, working in collaboration with other municipalities and with larger populations are more efficient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
qualitative output, efficiency, productivity, logit parameter model, fire departments
National Category
Economics Public Administration Studies Environmental Management Building Technologies
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68104 (URN)10.1080/00207543.2018.1489159 (DOI)000460630300015 ()
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Sund, B. & Jaldell, H. (2018). Security officers responding to residential fire alarms: Estimating the effect on survival and property damage. Fire safety journal, 97, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Security officers responding to residential fire alarms: Estimating the effect on survival and property damage
2018 (English)In: Fire safety journal, ISSN 0379-7112, E-ISSN 1873-7226, Vol. 97, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Decreasing the response time to residential fires leads to more people being saved, fewer injuries, less property damage and a lesser environmental impact. One way of reducing the response time to fires is to allow the municipal fire and rescue services to cooperate with other actors. This study evaluates a potential agreement between the fire and rescue service of a Swedish municipality (Helsingborg) and a private security officers' firm. A geographic information system (GIS) simulation is used to estimate the reduced response times. The result is combined with a statistically estimated measure of the risk of fatality for marginal changes in the response time to find the effect on survival rates and property damage. The results show that the response time is 52 s on average faster using security officers for residential fires. Combining this gain in response time with the relation to fatalities and adjusting for the fact that security officers are less effective imply a decreased death rate by 0.0105 or 1.3% per year. The project has positive economic effects with the benefits estimated to be 1.4 (saved lives) and respectively 2.3 (saved lives and property damage) times higher than the costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Community operational research, Cost benefit analysis, Residential fires, Response time, Simulation, Emergency services, Environmental impact, Fire protection, Fires, Housing, Response time (computer systems), Risk assessment, Risk perception, Death rates, Fire and rescue services, Operational research, Property damage, Security officers, Survival rate
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66544 (URN)10.1016/j.firesaf.2018.01.008 (DOI)000435047400001 ()
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Grahn, T. & Jaldell, H. (2017). Assessment of data availability for the development of landslide fatality curves. Landslides: Journal of the International Consortium on Landslides, 14(3), 1113-1126
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of data availability for the development of landslide fatality curves
2017 (English)In: Landslides: Journal of the International Consortium on Landslides, ISSN 1612-510X, E-ISSN 1612-5118, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 1113-1126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Quick clay landslides are a special feature of Norwegian and Swedish geologies. Vibrations or small initial landslides can cause a quick clay layer to collapse and liquefy, resulting in rapid landslides with little or no time for evacuation, making them a real threat to human life. Research concentrating on damages due to landslides is scarce, and analyses of loss of human lives caused by quick clay landslides in the scientific literature are, to our knowledge, non-existing. Fatality quantification can complement landslide risk assessments and serves as guidance for policy choices when evaluating efficient risk-reducing measures. The objectives of this study were to assess and analyze available damage information in an existing data set of 66 historical landslide events that occurred in Norway and Sweden between 1848 and 2009, and access its applicability for quantifying loss of human life caused by quick clay landslides. Fatality curves were estimated as functions of the number of exposed persons per landslide. Monte Carlo simulations were used to account for the uncertainties in the number of people actually exposed. The results of the study imply that the quick clay fatality curves are non-linear, indicating that the probability of losing lives increases exponentially when the number of exposed persons increases. Potential factors affecting human susceptibility to landslides (e.g., landslide-, area-, or individual-specific characteristics) could not be satisfyingly quantified based on available historical records. Future research should concentrate on quantifying susceptibility factors that can further explain human vulnerability to quick clay landslides.

Keywords
Landslide, Quick clay, Loss of life, Landslide fatalities, Data availability
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Risk and Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41135 (URN)10.1007/s10346-016-0775-6 (DOI)000401697900023 ()
Funder
Länsförsäkringar AB
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2019-07-12Bibliographically approved
Jaldell, H. (2017). How Important is the Time Factor? Saving Lives Using Fire and Rescue Services. Fire technology, 53(2), 695-708
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Important is the Time Factor? Saving Lives Using Fire and Rescue Services
2017 (English)In: Fire technology, ISSN 0015-2684, E-ISSN 1572-8099, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 695-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The shorter the response time of emergency services the more lives aresaved. But, how important in fact is the time factor for saving lives? The objective ofthis study is to analyse the relation between response time and fatalities, to be able tomeasure how many lives could be saved with a shorter response time. The study usesdata from reports from the fire and rescue services in Sweden for 2005–2013 for residentialfires. The time variable used is continuous and the statistical methods are non-linearregression techniques. It is found that the risk of fatality is a non-linear function ofresponse time. For a given change of response time, the increase in risk of fatality islarge for a short response time, then decreases, and eventually seems to approach zero.If it was possible to decrease the median response time by 1 min 0.00035 lives could besaved for every turn-out on average. For all turn-outs to residential homes that meansthat about two lives, or 3%, could be saved per year. The response time is most importantfor blocks of flats, nursing homes and semi-detached/terraced houses. The responsetime is more important for fires due to smoking, children playing or started intentionally(arson). The results can be used to evaluate the performance of local fire and rescueservices. The method is easy to use for other emergency services, such as ambulances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2017
Keywords
Fire department, Emergencies, Response time, Fatalities
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42015 (URN)10.1007/s10694-016-0592-4 (DOI)000393702300012 ()
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2017-09-26Bibliographically approved
Jaldell, H., Ryen, L., Sund, B. & Andersson, R. (2015). Are national injury prevention and research efforts matching the distribution of injuries across sectors?. Injury Prevention, 21(e1), e113-e115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are national injury prevention and research efforts matching the distribution of injuries across sectors?
2015 (English)In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 21, no e1, p. e113-e115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2011, 88% of all unintentional injury fatalities occurred in home and leisure environments in Sweden, while transportation fatalities accounted for 10% and work/school injuries for 2%. The corresponding proportions among non-fatal injuries were 75, 12 and 13%, respectively. However, 83% of the national governmental expenditure on unintentional injury prevention in 2011 was allocated to transportation safety, 7% to home and leisure, and 10% to the work sector including schools. Likewise, around 85% of the governmental research budget aimed for unintentional injury research was allocated to the transportation sector, 9% to home and leisure environments, and 6% to the work and school sector. Our results reveal a striking lack of correspondence between problem profile and governmental countermeasures.

National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33378 (URN)10.1136/injuryprev-2013-041120 (DOI)000351693200020 ()24599902 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-08-13 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved
Jaldell, H. (2015). HOW IMPORTANT IS THE TIME FACTOR?: SAVING LIVES USING FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICES. Value in Health, 18(7), A535-A535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HOW IMPORTANT IS THE TIME FACTOR?: SAVING LIVES USING FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICES
2015 (English)In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 18, no 7, p. A535-A535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64027 (URN)000209861300161 ()26533001 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
Jaldell, H., Lebnak, P. & Amornpetchsathaporn, A. (2014). Time Is Money, But How Much? The Monetary Value of Response Time for Thai Ambulance Emergency Services. Value in Health, 17(5), 555-560
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time Is Money, But How Much? The Monetary Value of Response Time for Thai Ambulance Emergency Services
2014 (English)In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 555-560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveTo calculate the monetary value of the time factor per minute and per year for emergency services.MethodsThe monetary values for ambulance emergency services were calculated for two different time factors, response time, which is the time from when a call is received by the emergency medical service call-taking center until the response team arrives at the emergency scene, and operational time, which includes the time to the hospital. The study was performed in two steps. First, marginal effects of reduced fatalities and injuries for a 1-minute change in the time factors were calculated. Second, the marginal effects and the monetary values were put together to find a value per minute.ResultsThe values were found to be 5.5 million Thai bath/min for fatality and 326,000 baht/min for severe injury. The total monetary value for a 1-minute improvement for each dispatch, summarized over 1 year, was 1.6 billion Thai baht using response time.ConclusionsThe calculated values could be used in a cost-benefit analysis of an investment reducing the response time. The results from similar studies could for example be compared to the cost of moving an ambulance station or investing in a new alarm system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
cost-benefit, emergency medical service, medicine, response time
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33379 (URN)10.1016/j.jval.2014.05.006 (DOI)000341084700009 ()25128048 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9667-2260

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