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Holmgren Troy, MariaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7640-0639
Publications (10 of 69) Show all publications
Holmgren Troy, M. (2019). From Sunnydale to Engelsfors and Back Again?: "Translating" Buffy and My So-Called Life across Decades, Media and National Borders. In: : . Paper presented at "ETC. Exchange Transformation Communication," Nordic Association of English Studies conference,Aarhus,Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Sunnydale to Engelsfors and Back Again?: "Translating" Buffy and My So-Called Life across Decades, Media and National Borders
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

On the publication of the first novel in the Swedish Engelsfors trilogy (2011-2013), which is about seven small-town teenage witches who have to stop the apocalypse, the two authors expressed the love they share for the ground-breaking American TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997-2003) and My So Called Life (1994-1995). These two series communicated in significant ways with Sara Elfgren and Mats Strandberg when they were teenagers in the 1990s. This paper will focus on how elements from the two American series have been adapted and translated into particular Swedish circumstances in the Engelsfors trilogy. Examining the transformations that such transcultural translation entails, I argue, adds to the understanding of the long-term influences of American productions on subsequent productions in other countries and media. Moreover, the Engelsfors trilogy has been translated into twenty-five different languages including English and may thus in turn have an impact on English-language cultural productions.

Keywords
Buffy the Vampire Slayer, My So-Called Life, the Engelsfors trilogy
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72783 (URN)
Conference
"ETC. Exchange Transformation Communication," Nordic Association of English Studies conference,Aarhus,Denmark
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-20
Holmgren Troy, M. (2019). "Strange Matings" and Cultural Encounters: Octavia Butler's Fiction as "Companion Species" to Theory. In: Birgit Spengler and Babette B. Tischleder (Ed.), An Eclectic Bestiary: Encounters in a More-than-Human World (pp. 263-275). Transcript Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Strange Matings" and Cultural Encounters: Octavia Butler's Fiction as "Companion Species" to Theory
2019 (English)In: An Eclectic Bestiary: Encounters in a More-than-Human World / [ed] Birgit Spengler and Babette B. Tischleder, Transcript Verlag, 2019, p. 263-275Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Transcript Verlag, 2019
Keywords
Octavia Butler, "Amnesty", "Bloodchild", theory, Homi Bhabha, Donna Haraway
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72785 (URN)10.14361/9783839445662 (DOI)978-3-8376-4566-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2018). Adapting Ideologies: Stephen King’s Kingdom Hospital and Matt Reeves’s Let Me In. In: : . Paper presented at Maple Leaf and Eagle conference in North American Studies,"Ideas,Ideals, and Ideologies," Helsinki, May 16-18, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adapting Ideologies: Stephen King’s Kingdom Hospital and Matt Reeves’s Let Me In
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper will draw on Linda Hutcheon’s account in A Theory of Adaptation (2013) of “transculturating” and “transcultural adaptations” in examining how two American adaptations of Nordic Gothic texts – Stephen King’s TV series Kingdom Hospital (2004) and Matt Reeves’s movie Let Me In (2010) – change what Hutcheon calls the “ideological valences” of the adapted texts: Lars von Trier’s Danish TV series Riget (1994, 1997) and John Ajvide Lindqvist’s Swedish novel Låt den rätte komma in (2004) and its subsequent 2008 Swedish film adaptation. All of these narratives introduce ghosts and/or vampires into actually existing and, to a large extent, realistically depicted late twentieth- or early twenty-first-century Scandinavian and American environments. However, I will argue that there are significant ideological differences between the Nordic and the American texts, which have an impact on both the aesthetics and the effects of these Gothic or horror narratives.

Keywords
adaptation, ideologies, Nordic Gothic, Stephen King, Matt Reeves
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67752 (URN)
Conference
Maple Leaf and Eagle conference in North American Studies,"Ideas,Ideals, and Ideologies," Helsinki, May 16-18, 2018
Available from: 2018-06-18 Created: 2018-06-18 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2018). Juliette Wells, Reading Austen in America [Review]. American Studies in Scandinavia, 50(2), 125-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Juliette Wells, Reading Austen in America
2018 (English)In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 125-128Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70631 (URN)000452941800011 ()
Available from: 2018-12-28 Created: 2018-12-28 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2018). Placing the Gothic in American Adaptations of Nordic Texts. In: : . Paper presented at 10th Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (SAAS), Stockholm, 28-30 September 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placing the Gothic in American Adaptations of Nordic Texts
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
American adaptations, Nordic Gothic
National Category
Humanities and the Arts
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69627 (URN)
Conference
10th Biennial Conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (SAAS), Stockholm, 28-30 September 2018
Available from: 2018-10-13 Created: 2018-10-13 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2016). Chronotopes in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. African American Review, 49(1), 19-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronotopes in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
2016 (English)In: African American Review, ISSN 1062-4783, E-ISSN 1945-6182, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article employs Bakhtin’s concept of the chronotope to examine the interrelatedness of different places, temporalities, characterization, and values in Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Focusing on the complex interactions of four chronotopes—Dr. Flint’s house, the provincial town, the grandmother’s house, and the garret—the article yields a deeper understanding of how Jacobs critiques antebellum American society and, at the same time, constructs the grandmother’s house as chronotope as a site of negotiation with her most obvious historical addressee: the Northern white middle-class woman.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016
Keywords
chronotopes, Bakhtin, Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, time, place
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41951 (URN)000373205800003 ()
Available from: 2016-04-30 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2016). Dealing with the Uncanny?: Cultural Adaptation in Matt Reeves’s Vampire Movie Let Me In. American Studies in Scandinavia, 48(1), 25-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dealing with the Uncanny?: Cultural Adaptation in Matt Reeves’s Vampire Movie Let Me In
2016 (English)In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to examine cultural adaptation and uncanny potential in Matt Reeves’s vampire movie Let Me In (2010), which is an adaptation of John Ajvide Lindqvist’s vampire novel Låt den rätte komma in (2004) – in English translation, Let the Right One In (2007) – and the Swedish film adaptation (2008), for which Lindqvist wrote the screenplay. The article draws on Linda Hutcheon’s theoretical account of “transculturating” and “transcultural adaptations” as well as on different discussions of the uncanny. My analysis establishes that both films evoke the uncanny by introducing horror into the familiar and ordinary as represented by the geographical setting; however, it also shows that there are significant ideological differences between the American film and the Swedish film and novel concerning gender and sexuality, particularly related to the two central figures of the boy and the vampire, but also in relationships that can be regarded as part of the general social and cultural setting. In short, gender-bending and sexual ambiguities, in addition to the uncanny aspects of the human protagonist, are omitted in the American version. In these respects, Reeves’s adaptation is less complex, less uncanny, and much more ideologically conservative than the Swedish versions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic association for American studies, 2016
Keywords
Matt Reeves, Let Me In, John Ajvide Lindqvist, Let the Right One In, cultural adaptation, the uncanny, horror film, vampire fiction  
National Category
General Literature Studies Specific Languages
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42911 (URN)000377421500003 ()
Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2016). The fact of metafiction in nineteenth-century children's literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder Book and Elizabeth Stoddard's Lolly Dinks's Doings. Nordic Journal of English Studies, 15(2), 132-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fact of metafiction in nineteenth-century children's literature: Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder Book and Elizabeth Stoddard's Lolly Dinks's Doings
2016 (English)In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines two American books for children: Nathaniel Hawthorne’s A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys (1851) and Elizabeth Stoddard’s Lolly Dinks’s Doings (1874). In both books, fairy tales or myths are framed by a contemporary American setting in which the stories is told. It is in these realistic frames with an adult storyteller and child listeners that metafictional features are found. The article shows that Hawthorne and Stoddard use a variety of metafictional elements. So, although metafiction has been regarded as a postmodernist development in children’s literature, there are in fact instances of metafiction in nineteenth-century American children’s literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborgs universitet, 2016
Keywords
metafiction, children’s literature, nineteenth-century American literature, Nathaniel Hawthorne, A Wonder Book, Elizabeth Stoddard, Lolly Dinks’s
National Category
Humanities and the Arts General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-43580 (URN)
Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. (2016). What will she give us all? Fur? Tails: Miscegenation and Medical Conditions in Octavia Butler's Science Fiction. In: : . Paper presented at European Association for American Studies Biennial Conference, Constanta, Romania, April 22-25, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What will she give us all? Fur? Tails: Miscegenation and Medical Conditions in Octavia Butler's Science Fiction
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Octavia Butler mentioned her “ongoing fascination with biology [and] medicine,” when commenting on one of her own short stories (first published in 1987) in which she has combined elements from three genetic disorders to create the premises for the story. This fascination locates much of her oeuvre at the intersection of miscegenation and the medical. In many of her novels, she addresses the racist notion of miscegenation both literally and figuratively, and in biological as well as cultural contexts. Many of her main characters are what other characters often regard as miscegenated offspring; most are placed in situations where they have to embrace, or at least accept, interracial or inter-species biological and/or cultural relations – hybrid lives – in order to survive and possibly develop. For instance, the quotation “What will she give us all? Fur? Tails?” comes from Butler’s last novel, Fledgling (2005). The protagonist of this novel is a genetic experiment, a hybrid, whose African American ancestry is the solution to a problem but, at the same time, means that her family members are murdered due to enduring racist ideas originating in American slavery, which in this speculative novel has spread to another humanoid species. In this paper, I will focus on how Butler portrays and comments on miscegenation in Clay’s Ark (1984), a science fiction novel that features a physician as one of the main characters and depicts an alien infection that changes not only people’s lives but also their offspring.

Keywords
Octavia Butler, miscegenation, medical conditions, African American literature, women writers
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41954 (URN)
Conference
European Association for American Studies Biennial Conference, Constanta, Romania, April 22-25, 2016
Available from: 2016-04-30 Created: 2016-04-30 Last updated: 2016-06-28Bibliographically approved
Holmgren Troy, M. & Ullén, M. (2015). Guest Editors' Note: Currents and Countercurrents. American Studies in Scandinavia, 47(2), 1-3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guest Editors' Note: Currents and Countercurrents
2015 (English)In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 1-3Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
English
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38898 (URN)000364606600001 ()
Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7640-0639

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