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De Vin, L., Jacobsson, L. & Odhe, J. (2019). Simulator-assisted lean production training. Production & Manufacturing Research, 7(1), 433-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulator-assisted lean production training
2019 (English)In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 433-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Lean Production training and education, simulators are often used.These can take the form of for instance desktop games, computersimulations, or full-scale simulators. Many training participants perceivemodels for experiential learning and for continuous improvementprocesses as complex and abstract. Based on experiences from trainingsessions in a full-scale simulator Karlstad Lean Factory®, a unifiedmodelfor learning and improvementwork is presented. Thismodel stimulatestraining transfer and is perceived as intuitive. It also shows instructionalscaffolding as a learning method. Suggestions for future work includeinvestigating synergy with Smart Manufacturing and the use of LeanProduction simulators for innovative product realisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Lean production; training within industry; training transfer; instructional scaffolding; Karlstad Lean Factory®
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-73609 (URN)10.1080/21693277.2019.1644248 (DOI)000476615100001 ()
Projects
Karlstad Lean Factory - genomförandefas (KLF2)
Funder
European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), 20201681Region Värmland, RV2018-51
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. & Jacobsson, L. (2017). Karlstad Lean Factory: An instructional factory for game-based lean manufacturing training. Production & Manufacturing Research, 5(1), 268-283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Karlstad Lean Factory: An instructional factory for game-based lean manufacturing training
2017 (English)In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 268-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation for training lean manufacturing ranges from simple paper-based or LEGO®-based games to larger scale simulation environments, for instance push car assembly. Some models for game-based learning are discussed and a model for lean manufacturing training is adopted . Many types of simulation may be suitable for teaching some basic elements of Lean manufacturing to students, but they are often less suitable for training industry workers in applying Lean manufacturing in their work environment. The latter group is more used to intuitive learning than to formal instruction. Thus, it is important that a training environment for this group more realistically represents the work environment; otherwise training transfer will be limited. For this reason, a lean training environment that includes materials processing stations as well as assembly areas was created. The stations exhibit some realistic behaviour such as stochastic breakdowns. Based on a comparison between factory workers and university students, five hypotheses for testing in future work are proposed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
lean manufacturing; experiential learning; industrial training; serious gaming
National Category
Engineering and Technology Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-64235 (URN)10.1080/21693277.2017.1374886 (DOI)000417212900001 ()
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2019-08-02Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L., Jacobsson, L., Odhe, J. & Wickberg, A. (2017). Lean Production Training for the Manufacturing Industry: Experiences from Karlstad Lean Factory. Paper presented at 27th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2017. Procedia Manufacturing, 11, Article ID 1019-1026.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean Production Training for the Manufacturing Industry: Experiences from Karlstad Lean Factory
2017 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 11, article id 1019-1026Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both literature and manufacturing companies state that simulators for providing training in lean production to industrialemployees must be similar to the work environment. This motivated the design of Karlstad Lean Factory, which is a trainingenvironment that realistically resembles an industrial environment. It is a full-scale training facility that incorporates acombination of materials processing and assembly. Parameters such as processing times, breakdown intervals and repair typescan be set. Examples of basic and more advanced training scenarios are given. Experiences from training groups of industrialemployees are described; inhomogeneity of these groups requires some specific attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Lean Production; Serious Gaming; Industrial Training; Experiential Learning; Instructional Factory
National Category
Engineering and Technology Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Mechanical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62701 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2017.07.208 (DOI)000419072100119 ()
Conference
27th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2017
Projects
Karlstad Lean Factory - förstudie
Funder
Region Värmland, RV2016-380Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth, 20201147
Available from: 2017-08-18 Created: 2017-08-18 Last updated: 2019-08-02Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. (2015). Simulation, Models, and Results: Reflections on their Nature and Credibility. In: Chike F. Oduoza (Ed.), Proceedings of Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2015, Wolverhampton, UK: . Paper presented at Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2015, 23 - 26 June 2015 at the University of Wolverhampton, UK. (pp. 148-155). Wolverhampton, UK: The Choir Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation, Models, and Results: Reflections on their Nature and Credibility
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2015, Wolverhampton, UK / [ed] Chike F. Oduoza, Wolverhampton, UK: The Choir Press , 2015, p. 148-155Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Simulation tools are widely used across the product, process and resource domains of product- and production development. This paper discusses the nature of simulation models and the wide use of simulation models .It uses virtual manufacturing, in particular discrete event simulation project methodology, as an example to elucidate important aspects of simulation, in particular human roles and some selected project phases of which verification and validation in relation to the simulation’s intended purpose are discussed in particular. The paper uses the NASA CAS model for credibility assessment of simulations to arrive at a schematic representation of how overall credibility as composed of aspect related to the model, the data, and the model’s use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolverhampton, UK: The Choir Press, 2015
Keywords
Simulation, Modelling, Validation, Credibility
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Other Computer and Information Science Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-36894 (URN)978-1-910864-00-5 (ISBN)
Conference
Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing, FAIM2015, 23 - 26 June 2015 at the University of Wolverhampton, UK.
Available from: 2015-06-27 Created: 2015-06-27 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. & Solis, J. (Eds.). (2014). Proceedings of the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference Mechatronics 2014. Paper presented at Mechatronics 2014, The 14th Mechatronics Forum International ConferenceKarlstad, Sweden, June 16-18. Karlstad, Sweden: Karlstads universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proceedings of the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference Mechatronics 2014
2014 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad, Sweden: Karlstads universitet, 2014. p. 657
Keywords
Mechatronics
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-32316 (URN)978-91-7063-564-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Mechatronics 2014, The 14th Mechatronics Forum International ConferenceKarlstad, Sweden, June 16-18
Note

Editorial: Welcome to Mechatronics 2014 in Karlstad, Sweden

With the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference, we celebrate 25 years of Mechatronics Forum conferences. Ever since the first conference in 1989 in Lancaster, the conference has succeeded in bringing together mechatronics experts, academic researchers and industrial practitioners alike, from all over the world in order to present and discuss new results and trends in mechatronics and to act as a stimulus for intensifying mechatronic approaches in research and product development. With its track record, the Mechatronics Forum conferences are the oldest series of mechatronics conferences still running.

With the 2014 event, jointly organised by Karlstad University and the University of Skövde with financial support from the City of Karlstad, the conference sets foot on Swedish soil for the second time in its history. This conference would not have been possible without the dedication en enthusiasm of many key players. Philip Moore and Andrew Plummer were among the people guiding the conference from the side of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Rudolf Scheidl, chairman of the preceding conference in Linz, provided much useful feedback and stimulated us to continue along the path of mini-symposia. Maria Kull handled all the registration issues as well as the local arrangements. Members of the International Programme Committee took various roles, not only in dedicating valuable time to actively reviewing submitted papers but also in identifying Keynote Speakers and in introducing new faces to the conference community. Through attracting new research communities and groups to the conference, the conference is continuously being renewed and enriched. This also demonstrates the high and ever increasing relevance of mechatronics as a research and applications field, which is the basis for the long-standing success of the conference series.

Mechatronics is sometimes associated with large complex systems. While such systems obviously provide some “show cases” for mechatronics, mechatronics becomes more and more important in our everyday life. Today, many consumer products are to some degree mechatronic products. Furthermore, the papers in this conference witness of the increasing role for mechatronics in environmental and social sustainability. Examples of the former are energy harvesting and minimization of energy requirements, for instance miniature sensors that harvest their own energy. Examples of the latter are many papers related to assisted living, which is important for an ageing population and for an inclusive society in which people with impairments can participate actively.

The proceedings of the 14th conference contain about 90 papers which are the result of a reviewing process that started off with over 140 abstracts submitted. This shows that the reviewing process has been rigorous to ensure that only papers of highest quality were accepted for publication and oral presentation. At the same time, many of the final papers included in the proceedings are authored or co-authored by research students, showing that the conference not only seeks to include new groups of senior researchers and industrial practitioners, but also embraces talented young researchers.

The Keynote talks will be delivered by four distinguished speakers: Prof. David Bradley will present “Mechatronics – Past, Present and Future”, Prof. Robert Gao “Intelligent Mechatronics for Advanced Manufacturing”, Prof. Shigeki Sugano “Human Symbiotic Robot - Design and Human Interaction”, and Prof. Rüdiger Dillmann “Status and recent progress towards interactive cognitive robot systems”.

The aim of this publication is to present the research results in mechatronics that are now state of the art, and indicate the possible future lines of development. The reader will appreciate the current challenges in modeling, control, actuation, sensing of mechatronics systems and the associated applications in industry and in society.

Leo J De Vin, Jorge Solis

Editors

Available from: 2014-06-05 Created: 2014-06-05 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. (2012). Credibility of Simulation Results – a Philosophical Perspective on Virtual Manufacturing. In: R.Scheidl & B. Jakoby (Ed.), Proceedings of the 13th Mechatronics Forum International Conference: . Paper presented at 13th Mechatronics Forum International Conference (pp. 784-791). Linz: TRAUNER Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Credibility of Simulation Results – a Philosophical Perspective on Virtual Manufacturing
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 13th Mechatronics Forum International Conference / [ed] R.Scheidl & B. Jakoby, Linz: TRAUNER Verlag, 2012, p. 784-791Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the factors that play a role in credibility of simulation results. It focuses on virtual manufacturing and in particular resource simulation as an example. However, a simulation model can be used in a number of different ways. Verification and validation of models is amongst other factors important for credibility. In this area, much work has been carried out in defense research. There are also some striking similarities between virtual manufacturing and information fusion, in particular in the field of human competence development related to credibility of simulations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linz: TRAUNER Verlag, 2012
Keywords
Simulation, Virtual Manufacturing
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Other Mechanical Engineering
Research subject
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14879 (URN)978-3-99033-046-3 (ISBN)
Conference
13th Mechatronics Forum International Conference
Projects
MKC
Available from: 2012-10-31 Created: 2012-09-21 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. (2012). Plagiering: en moralisk fråga eller en pedagogisk utmaning?.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plagiering: en moralisk fråga eller en pedagogisk utmaning?
2012 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Artikeln beskriver plagiat men även otillåtet samarbete. Uppfattningarna om vad som räknas till plagiat varierar dock. Plagiat är inte lika med fusk, för fusk krävs uppsåt att vilseleda. Plagiat uppstår ofta när studenter känner tidspress eller osäkerhet. Lärare brukar upptäcka indikeringar på möjligt plagiat på manga olika sätt, det är relativt sällan att antiplagieringsverktyg larmar utan att läraren redan har fått misstankar. Sättet som plagiat hanteras på beror på ett antal faktorer, till exempel om studenten vet om korrekt källhantering eller ej. Inte alla fall av plagiat blir ärenden för disciplinsnämnden. Som lärare kan man förebygga plagiat på olika sätt. Dels handlar det om information och träning för studenter, dels handlar det om utformning av examinationsuppgifter, till exempel variation av uppgifter och muntlig återkoppling.

Keywords
PUK, Pedagogiska Utvecklingskonferens, Plagiering
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-30172 (URN)
Note

Bidrag PUK 3 (3:e Pedagogiska Utvecklingskonferensen), Karlstads Universitet

Available from: 2013-11-23 Created: 2013-11-23 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Johansson, D. & De Vin, L. (2012). Towards Convergence in a Virtual Environment: Omnidirectional Movement, Physical Feedback, Social Interaction and Vision. Mechatronic Systems, 2(1), 11-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Convergence in a Virtual Environment: Omnidirectional Movement, Physical Feedback, Social Interaction and Vision
2012 (English)In: Mechatronic Systems, ISSN 1986-5147, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Movement, physical feedback, social interaction and vision are important factors for humans inthe real world, and therefore also in a virtual world whose aim is to mimic the real world. The effect of avirtual environment application could increase through the use of a human-computer interface that canmatch natural human capability in such areas, and several novel components are presented herein. Here,movement and feedback is gained through an omnidirectional walking surface that enables untetheredmovement throughout a virtual world without imposing physical restrictions. Although several differentapproaches exist to the mechanical problem of two-dimensional translation, an alternative top-downapproach can reduce complexity to one-dimensional space. Furthermore, interchange of subtle bodylanguage can be vital and achieved with a system that supports high fidelity in virtual texturerepresentation of users, which can be more powerful in some cases than virtual geometry. Also, a newapproach is taken to the design of a head mounted display with minimal weight through optics in the formof soft contact lenses, mounted directly on the eyes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Olney: InderScience Publishers, 2012
Keywords
Virtual Reality, User Interaction
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11889 (URN)
Available from: 2012-02-28 Created: 2012-02-28 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
De Vin, L. (2012). Virtual manufacturing: Theory and Practice. In: Savarese, Anthony B. (Ed.), Manufacturing Engineering. New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual manufacturing: Theory and Practice
2012 (English)In: Manufacturing Engineering / [ed] Savarese, Anthony B., New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter gives a general description of simulation and its associated system of interest. In the context of virtual manufacturing, three domains can be distinguished; product domain, process domain and resource domain. Examples of simulation in these there domains are given, as well as some examples of simulation across these domains. Typical steps/phases in a simulation project are described, as well as common pitfalls. In industrial simulation projects, usually a number of stakeholders are involved with different maturity/experience in the field of simulation. It is described how such industrial simulation projects can be supported by a handbook, developed in close collaboration with a group of companies. As one example of advanced applications, simulation-based remote monitoring and diagnostics is described. The other example of advanced applications given in the paper is that of simulation-based optimisation. Many simulation tools and projects aim at providing decision support to a human decision maker. High level information fusion, a development originating from defence research, also aims at providing decisions support. A comparison between virtual manufacturing and information fusion reveals that a popular reference model for information fusion called JDL-model is very apt to serve as a reference model for virtual manufacturing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012
Keywords
Virtual Manufacturing, Simulation
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11890 (URN)978-1-61209-987-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-02-28 Created: 2012-02-28 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
de Vin, L. (2011). Feature-based process planning for sheet metal components revisited. Paper presented at Swedish Production Symposium 2011. Paper presented at Swedish Production Symposium 2011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feature-based process planning for sheet metal components revisited
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract

The concept of form features in design and manufacturing is not new, but has in recent times received renewed attention in industry and academia. Manufacturing features play an important role in process planning. There are different ways to extract these manufacturing features from a product model, depending on how the model was generated. Problems related to feature extraction and reasoning include feature interactions and tolerances. For sheet metal components, some additional issues exist as the base material is flat sheet whereas the completed product is usually a three-dimensional structure. Feature abstractions can be used to avoid problems in manufacturing and increase flexibility in decision making. Compared to machining, some additional functions exist in sheet metal process planning such as flat wrap generation and nesting

Keywords
Features, process planning, sheet metal
National Category
Materials Engineering
Research subject
Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-10735 (URN)
Conference
Swedish Production Symposium 2011
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2019-07-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3108-6893

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