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Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Terp, U., Hjärthag, F. & Bisholt, B. (2019). Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral-Based Stress Management Program on Stress Management Competency, Self-efficacy and Self-esteem Experienced by Nursing Students. Nurse Educator, 44(1), E1-E5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a Cognitive Behavioral-Based Stress Management Program on Stress Management Competency, Self-efficacy and Self-esteem Experienced by Nursing Students
2019 (English)In: Nurse Educator, ISSN 0363-3624, E-ISSN 1538-9855, Vol. 44, no 1, p. E1-E5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nursing students' exposure to stress negatively affects both academic and clinical performance and potentially their future as professional nurses. This pilot study measured the effects of a 10-week cognitive behavioral therapy-based stress management program, using a quasi-experimental design. Independent t tests showed positive effects of the training program compared with a control group. Students' perceived stress management competency, self-efficacy, and self-esteem were higher 1 year after the intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2019
Keywords
cognitive behavioral training; group intervention, health promotion, nursing students, stress management
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70307 (URN)10.1097/NNE.0000000000000492 (DOI)000453438300001 ()29286989 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Sundler, A. J., Blomberg, K., Bisholt, B., Eklund, A. J., Windahl, J. & Larsson, M. (2019). Experiences of supervision during clinical education among specialised nursing students in Sweden: A cross-sectional study. Nurse Education Today, 79, 20-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of supervision during clinical education among specialised nursing students in Sweden: A cross-sectional study
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2019 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The importance of the clinical learning environment in nurse education has gained increasing attention over the last decades. However, there is a lack of research on the learning environment, its significance and meaning in specialist nurse education. Objective: The objectives of the study were to investigate specialised nursing students' experiences of supervision during clinical practice and to compare students who were satisfied with the supervision with those who were dissatisfied with respect to a)organisation of supervision and number of preceptors, as well as time allocated by preceptors for b)supervision, c)reflection, d)discussion of intended learning outcomes, and e)assessments of students' performance by preceptors. Design: This study used a cross-sectional design. Sample and settings: A convenience sample of specialised nursing students was derived from five Swedish universities in the years 2016 and 2017. Methods: Data were collected using a questionnaire. Statistical analyses and a qualitative conventional content analysis were performed. Results: While almost all specialised nursing students reported that there had been time for discussion on their performance assessment, almost half of the students reported not getting time for supervision, or time for reflections and discussions on intended learning outcomes with the preceptor. Students reporting having time allocated for supervision by preceptors were found to be more satisfied with supervision. It was described as important that the preceptor(s)acknowledged the students previous work experiences. Even though being a registered nurse, reflections and feedback were described as valuable for the students learning. Several preceptors were described as positive allowing a broader picture and different views regarding working as a specialist nurse. Conclusions: This study indicates that supervision, in terms of discussions and reflections, of specialised nursing students is significant for learning experiences and satisfaction during clinical placement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Clinical practice, Community health care, Graduate nursing education, Learning, Preceptorship, Primary health care, Specialist nurse education, Supervision, article, clinical education, community care, content analysis, controlled study, convenience sample, cross-sectional study, human, human experiment, nursing education, nursing student, outcome assessment, questionnaire, registered nurse, satisfaction, statistical analysis, Sweden, work experience
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72501 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2019.05.009 (DOI)000473377700004 ()2-s2.0-85065447098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Terp, U., Bisholt, B. & Hjärthag, F. (2019). Not Just Tools to Handle It: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Students' Experiences From Participating in a Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Intervention. Health Education & Behavior
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not Just Tools to Handle It: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Students' Experiences From Participating in a Cognitive Behavioral Stress Management Intervention
2019 (English)In: Health Education & Behavior, ISSN 1090-1981, E-ISSN 1552-6127Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background. Stress-related problems are an increasing challenge within nurse education since it affects learning, professional development, and mental health negatively. Despite this, knowledge is scarce regarding nursing students' experiences of being in stress management interventions. Aim. This study aimed to describe how nursing students experienced a preventive cognitive behavioral therapy-based stress management intervention. Method. Data were collected through 14 semistructured interviews with nursing students who had participated in a stress management intervention, and analyzed using inductive qualitative content analysis. Results. The analysis yielded one theme, Turning points, which consisted of four categories: (1) more in touch with reality, (2) increased self-confidence, (3) improved communication skills, and (4) a new way of reflecting. Discussion. Findings emphasize the importance of both theoretical and structural aspects when planning a stress management training intervention. A group format delivery in combination with a multicomponent cognitive behavioral intervention can be interrelated elements for positive stress-related changes. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that participants developed new and more adaptive coping strategies, which were attributed to the intervention. The participants expressed that they had increased their ability to reflect, which led to increased insight and self-reflection. The intervention constitutes an example of a contribution to stress management research and provides information for stress management training initiatives in nurse education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Thousand Oaks, CA, USA: Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
health promotion, higher education, nursing students, prevention, qualitative content analysis, stress management
National Category
Nursing Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology; Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74570 (URN)10.1177/1090198119865319 (DOI)000481300300001 ()31394927 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-29 Created: 2019-08-29 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Lindwall, L. & Bisholt, B. (2019). Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study. Nursing Open
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study
2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: During many years the operating theatre nurse's clinical competence has been describing in relation to patient safety, but the nursing care of the patient remains unclear. Therefore, we want in this study to investigate the relationship between background factors of operating theatre nurses self-rated clinical competence and describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence in perioperative nursing.Methods: A cross-sectional study with a mixed method approach was chosen. The instrument Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence was used for self-rating operating theatre nurses' clinical competence in perioperative nursing, and an open-ended question was added to describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence. In total, 1057 operating theatre nurses in Sweden were asked to participate, and 303 responded (28 %). They had different educational backgrounds and professional experiences, and were employed in universities or central/regional and district hospitals.Results: Academic degree, professional experience and place of employment were significant for the development of the operating theatre nurses' clinical competence. Academic degree appeared to affect operating theatre nurse leadership and cooperation, as well as how consultations took place with other professions about patient care. Being employed at a university hospital had a positive effect on professional development and critical thinking.Conclusions:  An academic degree influenced the operating theatre nurses' ability to act in complex situations, and along with professional experience strengthened the nurses' ability to use different problem-solving strategies and face the consequences of decisions made. Scientific knowledge and interprofessional learning and competence development in medical technologies should supplement nursing care for the development of clinical competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
mixed method, operating theatre nurse, perioperative nursing, clinical competence
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69842 (URN)10.1002/nop2.352 (DOI)000480822100001 ()
Note

Artikeln ingick som manuskript i Blombergs doktorsavhandling.

Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Granrud, M. D., Anderzen-Carlsson, A., Bisholt, B. & Steffenak, A. K. (2019). Public health nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration related to adolescents' mental health problems in secondary schools: A phenomenographic study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(15-16), 2899-2910
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public health nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration related to adolescents' mental health problems in secondary schools: A phenomenographic study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 15-16, p. 2899-2910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To describe the variation in public health nurses' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration related to adolescents' mental health problems in secondary schools in Norway. Background: Mental health problems among adolescents account for a large portion of the global burden of disease and affect 10%–20% of adolescents worldwide. Public health nurses in school health services play an important role in disease prevention and promotion of physical and mental health. In order to serve adolescents with regard to mental health problems, public health nurses are dependent on collaboration with other professionals in schools. Design: Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 public health nurses working in the school health services. Method: A phenomenographic approach was used for interviewing and for analysing the qualitative interviews. This study is presented in line with COREQ's checklist. Result: The analysis resulted in three descriptive categories based on eight identified conceptions. The categories are as follows: “The formal structure has an impact on interprofessional collaboration”; “The public health nurse is an important, but not always self-evident, partner in interprofessional collaboration”; and “The primary players are the teachers in collaboration.”. Conclusion: The public health nurses describe that they had limited impact on collaboration and were dependent on both the school principal and the teachers for achieving good collaboration. Teachers have the power to decide whether to collaborate with the public health nurse, and public health nurses regard teachers as the most important collaborative partners. The public health nurses need to make themselves and their competence visible. Relevance to clinical practice: The findings demonstrated that public health nurses are important collaborators, but are not always included in interprofessional collaboration. This knowledge is essential to strengthen public health nurses' roles and presence in schools, which could most certainly benefit adolescents with mental health problems in secondary school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
Keywords
adolescents, interprofessional collaboration, mental health problems, phenomenography, public health nurse, secondary school
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-72498 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14881 (DOI)000476595300018 ()2-s2.0-85065186850 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Bisholt, B. & Lindwall, L. (2019). Value conflicts in perioperative practice. Nursing Ethics, 26(7-8), 2213-2224, Article ID 969733018798169.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value conflicts in perioperative practice
2019 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 26, no 7-8, p. 2213-2224, article id 969733018798169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves.

OBJECTIVES:: This study describes operating theatre nurses' experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice.

RESEARCH DESIGN:: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:: The study followed ethical principles in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and approval was granted by the local university ethics committee.

FINDINGS:: The result showed that value conflicts arose in perioperative practice when operating theatre nurses were prevented from being present in the perioperative nursing process, because of current habits in perioperative practice. The patient's care became uncaring when health professionals did not see and listen to each other and when collaboration in the surgical team was not available for the patient's best. This occurred when operating theatre nurses' competence was not taken seriously and was ignored in patient care.

CONCLUSION:: Value conflicts arose when operating theatre nurses experienced that continuity of patient care was lacking. They experienced compassion with the patient but still had the will and ability to be there and take responsibility for the patient. This led to feelings of despair, powerlessness and of having a bad conscience which could lead to dissatisfaction, and even resignations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Care ethics, perioperative practice, theatre nurses, value conflicts
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70021 (URN)10.1177/0969733018798169 (DOI)000486024000029 ()30345880 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Bisholt, B. & Lindwall, L. (2018). Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice. Nursing Open, 5(3), 414-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice
2018 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
ethic, hermeneutic text interpretation, operating theatre nurse, perioperative nursing, responsibility
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68748 (URN)10.1002/nop2.153 (DOI)000439858900022 ()30062035 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09
Abelsson, A. & Bisholt, B. (2017). Nurse students learning acute care by simulation: Focus on observation and debriefing. Nurse Education in Practice, 24, 6-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse students learning acute care by simulation: Focus on observation and debriefing
2017 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 24, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Simulation creates the possibility to experience acute situations during nursing education which cannot easily be achieved in clinical settings. Aim: To describe how nursing students learn acute care of patients through simulation exercises, based on observation and debriefing. Design: The study was designed as an observational study inspired by an ethnographic approach.MethodData was collected through observations and interviews. Data was analyzed using an interpretive qualitative content analysis.Results: Nursing students created space for reflection when needed. There was a positive learning situation when suitable patient scenarios were presented. Observations and discussions with peers gave the students opportunities to identify their own need for knowledge, while also identifying existing knowledge. Reflections could confirm or reject their preparedness for clinical practice. The importance of working in a structured manner in acute care situations became apparent. However, negative feedback to peers was avoided, which led to a loss of learning opportunity.Conclusion: High fidelity simulation training as a method plays an important part in the nursing students' learning. The teacher also plays a key role by asking difficult questions and guiding students towards accurate knowledge. This makes it possible for the students to close knowledge gaps, leading to improved patient safety.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Nurse education, Simulation, Observation, Debriefing, Content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48164 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2017.03.001 (DOI)000402020900002 ()
Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, k. & Bisholt, B. (2016). Clinical group supervision for integrating ethical reasoning: view from students and supervisors. Nursing Ethics, 23(7), 761-769
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical group supervision for integrating ethical reasoning: view from students and supervisors
2016 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 761-769Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Clinical group supervision has existed for over 20 years in nursing. However, there is a lack of studies about the role of supervision in nursing students' education and especially the focus on ethical reasoning. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe nursing students' ethical reasoning and their supervisors' experiences related to participation in clinical group supervision. Research design: The study is a qualitative interview study with interpretative description as an analysis approach. Participants and research context: A total of 17 interviews were conducted with nursing students (n = 12) who had participated in clinical group supervision in their first year of nursing education, and with their supervisors (n = 5). Ethical considerations: The study was based on the ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki, and permission was obtained from the Regional Ethical Review Board in Sweden. Findings: The analysis revealed that both the form and content of clinical group supervision stimulated reflection and discussion of handling of situations with ethical aspects. Unethical situations were identified, and the process uncovered underlying caring actions. Discussion and conclusion: Clinical group supervision is a model that can be used in nursing education to train ethical reflection and to develop an ethical competence among nursing students. Outcomes from the model could also improve nursing education itself, as well as healthcare organizations, in terms of reducing moral blindness and unethical nursing practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Caring; clinical supervision; competence; ethics; learning; nursing students
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45820 (URN)10.1177/0969733015583184 (DOI)000387749100005 ()25977518 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-09 Created: 2016-09-09 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Isaksson, A.-K., Allvin, R., Bisholt, B., Ewertsson, M., Engstrom, A. K., . . . Gustafsson, M. (2016). Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(1), 80-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim was to investigate occupational stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to the workplace and clinical group supervision. Background Being a newly graduated nurse is particularly stressful. What remains unclear is whether the workplace and clinical group supervision affect the stress. Method A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in 2012. Data were collected by means of a numerical scale measuring occupational stress, questions about workplace and clinical group supervision. One hundred and thirteen nurses who had recently graduated from three Swedish universities were included in the study. Results The stress was high among the newly graduated nurses but it differed significantly between workplaces, surgical departments generating the most stress. Nurses who had received clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. The stress between workplaces remained significant also when participation in clinical group supervision was taken into account. Conclusions Newly graduated nurses experience great stress and need support, especially those in surgical departments. Nurses participating in clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. Implications for nursing management It is important to develop strategies that help to adapt the work situation so as to give nurses the necessary support. Clinical group supervision should be considered as an option for reducing stress.

Keywords
clinical group supervision, newly graduated nurses, occupational stress, workplace
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-40999 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12274 (DOI)000368263600021 ()25421164 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-09 Created: 2016-03-09 Last updated: 2019-07-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8836-5842

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