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Johansson, Inger
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Publications (10 of 74) Show all publications
From, I., Wilde-Larsson, B., Nordström, G. & Johansson, I. (2015). Formal caregivers' perceptions of quality of care for older people: predicting factors. BMC Research Notes, 8(623)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Formal caregivers' perceptions of quality of care for older people: predicting factors
2015 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, no 623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Despite the growing number of studies concerning quality of care for older people, there is a lack of studies depicting factors associated with good quality of care from the formal caregivers’ perspective. The aim was to describe formal caregivers’ perceptions of quality of care for older people in the community and explore factors associated with these perceptions. In total, 70 nursing assistants, 163 enrolled nurses and 198 registered nurses from 14 communities in central Sweden participated in the study. They filled out the following questionnaires: a modified version of Quality from the Patient’s Perspective, Creative Climate Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, items regarding education and competence, Health Index and Sense of coherence questionnaire. The overall response rate was 57 % (n = 431).

Results

In the perceived reality of quality of care respondents assessed the highest mean value in the dimension medical-technical competence and physical technical conditions and lower values in the dimensions; identity-oriented approach, socio-cultural atmosphere and in the context specific dimension. The caregivers estimated their competence and health rather high, had lower average values in sense of coherence and organizational climate and low values in stress of conscience.

Conclusions

The PR of quality of care were estimated higher among NA/ENs compared to RNs. Occupation, organizational climate and stress of conscience were factors associated with quality of care that explained 42 % of the variance. Competence, general health and sense of coherence were not significantly associated to quality of care. The mentioned factors explaining quality of care might be intertwined and showed that formal caregivers’ working conditions are of great importance for quality of care.

Keywords
Patient’s Perspective, Creative Climate Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-8957 (URN)10.1186/s13104-015-1597-7 (DOI)
Note

This article was published as manuscript in the thesis.

Available from: 2011-12-15 Created: 2011-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Wangensteen, S., Johansson, I. & Nordström, G. (2015). Nurse Competence Scale: Psychometric testing in a Norwegian context. Nurse Education in Practice, 15(1), 22-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse Competence Scale: Psychometric testing in a Norwegian context
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to test the construct validity of the Nurse Competence Scale. The Nurse Competence Scale has been used in hospital settings for various purposes in several countries. Despite this, confirmatory factor analyses are scarcely reported. The present study is based on re-analyses of data from 2007 (i.e. psychometric testing) and 593 newly graduated nurses working in various contexts were included. Confirmatory as well as exploratory factor analyses (Principal Component Analysis) were carried out. The original 7-factor model of the Nurse Competence Scale (73 items) was not confirmed. The exploratory factor analyses resulted in a Norwegian Nurse Competence Scale consisting of 46 items in the following competence categories: Planning and delivery of care, Teaching functions, Professional leadership, Research utilization and nursing values and Professional awareness. The results underline the needs for psychometric testing of an instrument after translation processes. The instrument is suitable for describing and comparing nurse competence for various reasons. It may also be helpful in creating competence development programs at an individual as well as at an organizational level. Further studies with a broader sample are recommended. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2015
Keywords
Nurse competence, Confirmatory factor analysis, Exploratory factor analysis, Psychometric testing
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41658 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2014.11.007 (DOI)000350519600005 ()25434831 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
Bergh, A.-L., Johansson, I., Persson, E., Karlsson, J. & Friberg, F. (2015). Nurses´ Patient Education Questionnaire: Development and validation process. Journal of Research in Nursing, 20(3), 181-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses´ Patient Education Questionnaire: Development and validation process
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Research in Nursing, ISSN 1744-9871, E-ISSN 1744-988X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 181-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conditions for nurses' daily patient education work are unclear and require clarification. The aim was to develop and validate the Nurses' Patient Education Questionnaire, a questionnaire that assesses nurses' perceptions of appropriate conditions for patient education work: what nurses say they actually do and what they think about what they do. The questionnaire was developed from a literature review, resulting in the development of five domains. This was followed by 'cognitive interviewing' with 14 nurses and dialogue with 5 pedagogical experts. The five domains were identified as significant for assessing nurses' beliefs and knowledge; education environment; health care organisation; interdisciplinary cooperation and collegial teamwork; and patient education activities. A content validity index was used for agreement of relevance and consensus of items by nurses (n = 10). The total number of items in the final questionnaire is 60, consisting of demographic items, what nurses report they do and perceptions about patient education in daily work. The questionnaire can be used by managers and nurses to identify possibilities and barriers to patient education in different care contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33453 (URN)10.1177/1744987114531583 (DOI)000355839500004 ()
Available from: 2014-08-25 Created: 2014-08-25 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Unis, B., Johansson, I. & Sällström, C. (2015). Rural High School Students' Sexual Behavior and Self-esteem. Open Journal of Nursing, 5(1), 24-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural High School Students' Sexual Behavior and Self-esteem
2015 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Negative consequences for sexual health may be caused by risky sexual behavior related to attitudes, norms and self-efficacy regarding sexuality. Research has not resulted in a consensus on the associations between self-esteem and adolescents’ sexual behavior.

Aims and objectives: The aim of the study was to describe high school students’ sexual behavior and self-esteem, along with investigating the relationship of attitudes, norms, self-efficacy, and self-esteem to sexual risk behavior. Another aim was to describe and compare gender differences in self-esteem and sexual risk behavior in high school students in a rural context.

Methodological design: A cross-sectional design was used. The participants were 139 high school students, 16 to 18 years of age, sample size was decided by power calculation, and systematic randomized sampling was used. The students replied to a questionnaire about self-esteem, factors affecting sexual risk behavior, and sexual behavior.

Results: Swedish high school students reported having few sexual partners, a low use of alcohol along with sex, yet a low consistency in condom use. The students reported both high basic self-esteem as well as earned self-esteem. Basic self-esteem was higher for male students while earned self-esteem was higher for female students. Significant correlations were found between self-esteem and some factors affecting sexual risk behavior related to condom use.

Conclusion: High school students exhibited positive sexual behaviors and high levels of self-esteem, yet they put themselves at risk by inconsistent use of condoms Our findings can contribute  the need of  to an awareness of  the role self-esteem, attitudes, norms and self-efficacy plays in adolescents’ sexual behavior. Nurses working at the youth clinics are in a key position to discuss sexual health issues with adolescents to promote healthy outcomes in sexual health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2015
Keywords
Reproductive health, Sexual behavior, Self-esteem, Adolescent health
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-35023 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2015.51004 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-27 Created: 2015-01-27 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Björkström, M., Johansson, I. & Athlin, E. (2014). An attempt to improve nurses' interest in and use of research in clinical practice by means of network support to facilitator nurses. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 4(3), 58-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An attempt to improve nurses' interest in and use of research in clinical practice by means of network support to facilitator nurses
2014 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 58-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Scientific knowledge is expected to be used in clinical practice to ensure that patients are given evidence-based nursing care. Therefore, in order to improve nurses’ research utilisation in clinical practice a network had been provided for nurses especially interested in nursing development in eleven wards. These nurses were expected to take on the role of key person (facilitator) for nursing development in clinical practice.Aim: The study was aimed at describing nurses’ interest in nursing research, how network support to ‘facilitator nurses’ could improve development in patient care based on evidence, and what hindering factors for such development could be.Methods: One and a half years after onset of the project a follow-up study was conducted with a questionnaire answered by 75 (64%) nurses, and group interviews with nine facilitators and eleven head nurses.Findings: The nurses’ interest in research utilisation was in general high and in eight wards development work had started. The facilitator nurses had mostly worked without involving their colleagues. Hindering factors for nursing development were related to time, EBP knowledge, involvement and the interest of head nurses and colleagues. Education, work place, previous participation in research projects, and participation in the network impacted positively on nurses’ attitudes to and interest in research.Conclusion and implication for clinical practice: Providing networks to ‘facilitator nurses’ in the ward could be useful for developing nursing care based on research findings. However, support from nurse leaders, involvement of the whole nursing staff, and training in research utilisation are important factors for success.

Keywords
Clinical nursing, Evidence-based practice, Facilitator, Network support, Research utilisation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34729 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v4n3p58 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-12-05 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Simonsen, B. O., Daehlin, G. K., Johansson, I. & Farup, P. G. (2014). Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study. BMC Health Services Research, 14, Article ID 580.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study
2014 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 14, article id 580Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nurses experience insufficient medication knowledge; particularly in drug dose calculations, but also in drug management and pharmacology. The weak knowledge could be a result of deficiencies in the basic nursing education, or lack of continuing maintenance training during working years. The aim of this study was to compare the medication knowledge, certainty and risk of error between graduating bachelor students in nursing and experienced registered nurses. Methods: Bachelor students in closing term and registered nurses with at least one year job experience underwent a multiple choice test in pharmacology, drug management and drug dose calculations: 3x14 questions with 3-4 alternative answers (score 0-42). Certainty of each answer was recorded with score 0-3, 0-1 indicating need for assistance. Risk of error was scored 1-3, where 3 expressed high risk: being certain that a wrong answer was correct. The results are presented as mean and (SD). Results: Participants were 243 graduating students (including 29 men), aged 28.2 (7.6) years, and 203 registered nurses (including 16 men), aged 42.0 (9.3) years and with a working experience of 12.4 years (9.2). The knowledge among the nurses was found to be superior to that of the students: 68.9%(8.0) and 61.5%(7.8) correct answers, respectively, (p < 0.001). The difference was largest in drug management and dose calculations. The improvement occurred during the first working year. The nurses expressed higher degree of certainty and the risk of error was lower, both overall and for each topic (p < 0.01). Low risk of error was associated with high knowledge and high sense of coping (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The medication knowledge among experienced nurses was superior to bachelor students in nursing, but nevertheless insufficient. As much as 25% of the answers to the drug management questions would lead to high risk of error. More emphasis should be put into the basic nursing education and in the introduction to medication procedures in clinical practice to improve the nurses' medication knowledge and reduce the risk of error.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Nursing education, Medication, Safety, Pharmacology, Drug dose calculations, MCQ test
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41485 (URN)10.1186/s12913-014-0580-7 (DOI)000347343900001 ()25413244 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Simonsen, B. O., Daehlin, G. K., Johansson, I. & Farup, P. G. (2014). Improvement of drug dose calculations by classroom teaching or e-learning: a randomised controlled trial in nurses. BMJ Open, 4(10), Article ID e006025.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of drug dose calculations by classroom teaching or e-learning: a randomised controlled trial in nurses
2014 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 10, article id e006025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Insufficient skills in drug dose calculations increase the risk for medication errors. Even experienced nurses may struggle with such calculations. Learning flexibility and cost considerations make e-learning interesting as an alternative to classroom teaching. This study compared the learning outcome and risk of error after a course in drug dose calculations for nurses with the two methods. Methods: In a randomised controlled open study, nurses from hospitals and primary healthcare were randomised to either e-learning or classroom teaching. Before and after a 2-day course, the nurses underwent a multiple choice test in drug dose calculations: 14 tasks with four alternative answers (score 0-14), and a statement regarding the certainty of each answer (score 0-3). High risk of error was being certain that incorrect answer was correct. The results are given as the mean (SD). Results: 16 men and 167 women participated in the study, aged 42.0 (9.5) years with a working experience of 12.3 (9.5) years. The number of correct answers after e-learning was 11.6 (2.0) and after classroom teaching 11.9 (2.0) (p=0.18, NS); improvement were 0.5 (1.6) and 0.9 (2.2), respectively (p=0.07, NS). Classroom learning was significantly superior to e-learning among participants with a pretest score below 9. In support of e-learning was evaluation of specific value for the working situation. There was no difference in risk of error between groups after the course (p=0.77). Conclusions: The study showed no differences in learning outcome or risk of error between e-learning and classroom teaching in drug dose calculations. The overall learning outcome was small. Weak precourse knowledge was associated with better outcome after classroom teaching.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2014
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41576 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006025 (DOI)000344774500058 ()25344483 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I., Bååth, C., Wilde-Larsson, B. & Hall-Lord, M.-L. (2013). Acute confusion states, pain, health, functional status and quality of care among patients with hip fracture during hospital stay. International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 17(3), 120-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute confusion states, pain, health, functional status and quality of care among patients with hip fracture during hospital stay
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe aim of the study was to investigate: acute confusional states, pain and pain relief, physical health, psychological well-being and functional status among patients with hip fracture during hospital stay. A further aim was to describe patient's perceptions of quality of care.

MethodForty-nine patients with hip fracture ⩾70 years old were consecutively included in the study at two hospitals in Sweden. Data were collected by interview and observation using structured questionnaires at four occasions.

ResultsThe incidence of acute confusion was 32% on admission and the day after surgery and 14% the day before discharge. Additional diagnosis and on-going medication were significantly more common among confused patients. Patients with confusion experienced more intense pain at rest on admission and the day before discharge than non-confused patients. On perceived reality in quality of care patients' reported most favourable scores with regard to respect and empathy from the nurses and less favourable scores with regard to the information of responsible persons and information after procedures. The overall subjective importance of quality of care was higher than on the perceived quality of care.

ConclusionMore attention, systematic observations and preventive actions should be taken when there are signs of acute confusion, pain and pain relief among patients with hip fracture. Patients' ratings of the subjective nature of care were higher than the perceived reality of quality of care and needs to be given attention since subjective importance reflects how the patients want their care to be.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Acute confusional states, Delirium, Hip fractures, Functional ability, Pain, Quality of care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-16210 (URN)10.1016/j.ijotn.2012.07.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
From, I., Nordström, G., Wilde-Larsson, B. & Johansson, I. (2013). Caregivers in older peoples' care: Perception of quality, working conditions, competence and personal health. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 27(3), 704-714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caregivers in older peoples' care: Perception of quality, working conditions, competence and personal health
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 704-714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-8956 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01083.x (DOI)000321625800025 ()23088213 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-12-15 Created: 2011-12-15 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Wangensteen, S., Johansson, I. S., Björkström, M. E. & Nordström, G. (2012). Newly Graduated Nurses' Perception Of Competence And Possible Predictors: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Professional Nursing, 28(3), 170-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Newly Graduated Nurses' Perception Of Competence And Possible Predictors: A Cross-Sectional Survey
2012 (English)In: Journal of Professional Nursing, ISSN 8755-7223, E-ISSN 1532-8481, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 170-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe newly graduated nurses' own perception of competence and to identify possible predictors influencing their perceptions. The target population included nurses who graduated from nursing colleges in June 2006. Data collection was carried out from October 2006 until April 2007 using the Nurse Competence Scale (NCS), the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and the Research Utilization Questionnaire. The response rate was 33% (n = 620). Pearson's chi-square test, Student t test, and regression analyses were used for statistical calculations. The respondents assessed their overall competence level as "good" and assessed themselves most competent in providing ethical and individualized nursing care. They assessed themselves least competent in evaluating outcomes and further development of patient care. Their use of competence explained between 40% (helping) and 10% (managing) of the variance within the NCS competence categories. Critical thinking (CT) was the most prominent predictor for perception of competence in all competence categories and the overall competence, alone explaining between 20% (NCS total score) and 9% (managing) of the variance. The finding that CT was a significant predictor for perception of competence may indicate that developing nursing students' CT abilities is valuable to increase newly graduated nurses' perception of competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Critical thinking, Cross-sectional, Nurse competence, Nurse education, Regression analyses
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38505 (URN)10.1016/j.profnurs.2011.11.014 (DOI)000305044800007 ()22640949 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved
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