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Berglund, Anna-Lena
Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Lindberg, N. & Berglund, A.-L. (2014). Mothers' experiences of feeding babies born with cleft lip and palate. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 28(1), 66-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mothers' experiences of feeding babies born with cleft lip and palate
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 66-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cleft lip and palate (CLP) in newborns have implications for feeding. It might impede the child's attempts to seal around the nipple and to create intraoral pressure. Parents needed support and information about feeding after birth. Mothers' own experiences and how they coped with the challenges related to feeding have not been extensively studied. The aims of this study were twofold: to describe the experiences of feeding for mothers of children born with CLP and to elucidate how the mothers cope with the challenges related to feeding. A qualitative descriptive method and phenomenographic analysis were used to analyse the narratives. Twelve mothers of babies with CLP were strategically selected and interviewed. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Ethical approval for the study was granted by the local ethical committee. The findings resulted in two main categories and five subcategories. The first main category, Being a capable and good mother, included descriptions associated with the mothers' strong desire to do what was best for the child and about how they experienced feeding. The second main category, Coping with the challenges related to feeding, included descriptions of what the mothers perceived as important in order to cope with the challenges related to feeding; of how personal resources were used; of the significance of the father and close family; and of how healthcare professionals contributed. In conclusion, mothers of children born with CLP were in need of individual information by healthcare professionals with expertise, at the time of the diagnosis and until the feeding was manageable. Furthermore, the mothers' personal resources, the fathers and immediate family were of major importance for the mothers to cope with challenges related to feeding.

Keywords
cleft lip, cleft palate, newborn, mother, feeding behaviour, breastfeeding, experience, father, coping, phenomenography
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41551 (URN)10.1111/scs.12048 (DOI)000329925600008 ()23607258 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Berglund, A.-L., Larsson, M. & Athlin, E. (2012). Patient's sexuality: A neglected area of cancer nursing?. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 16(4), 426-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient's sexuality: A neglected area of cancer nursing?
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to describe nurses' conceptions of dialogues about sexuality with cancer patients.

MethodsThe study was carried out using phenomenographic method. Ten nurses from different care contexts where nurses meet cancer patients in various phases of trajectory of care were interviewed.

ResultsThe analysis revealed one main category 'We should talk about sexuality – but we usually don't' and three descriptive categories consisting of nurses' qualitatively different conceptions of talks about sexuality: (1) nurses' attitudes, knowledge and skills are impacting, (2) patients' sexual problems are the basis for dialogues and (3) the ward environment is impacting. The main category was hierarchically ranged and could be further understood by the descriptive categories.

ConclusionThe study showed that cancer patients' need of talks about and support regarding sexuality were conceived as being low during the whole trajectory of care. Despite this the nurses conceived that they should talk about sexuality with the patients, but due to own attitudes, knowledge and skills, as well as conditions in the ward environment they usually did not. Further studies are needed to clarify how cancer patients especially with non-sex specific diagnosis describe their sexual problems and needs of support in regard to sexuality. About what, when, how and by whom, cancer patients and their partners want information and supportive care related to sexuality need to be clarified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-12137 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2011.10.003 (DOI)000308770200012 ()22036773 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-03-12 Created: 2012-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Anderberg, P. & Berglund, A.-L. (2010). Elderly persons' experiences of striving to recieve care on their own terms in nursing homes. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 16(1), 64-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elderly persons' experiences of striving to recieve care on their own terms in nursing homes
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 64-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Elderly persons' participation in and decisions about their own care need more attention. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of elderly persons' experiences of care and help, and how their lives change in nursing homes. Fifteen elderly persons living in four nursing homes were interviewed about their experiences of needing care and help in their daily life. The interviews were analysed using van Manen's phenomenological approach. Elderly persons' experiences of care and help were described as: a balance between sorrow and relief, a struggle to maintain control and connectedness, managing to live in the present and yet worrying about the future, and an attempt to hide one's vulnerability in order to be accepted and create an inner calm in an exposed situation. In conclusion, important issues were raised concerning elderly persons' perspectives on care and help in daily life in nursing homes.

Keywords
care; elderly person; nursing homes; phenomenology
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-4914 (URN)10.1111/j.1440-172X.2009.01808.x (DOI)000274177000010 ()20158550 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-11-16 Created: 2009-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Johansson, I. & Berglund, A.-L. (2010). The life as family caregiver: Utilization of respite care in the community. In: : . Paper presented at WENR conference, Rotterdam, Nederländerna.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The life as family caregiver: Utilization of respite care in the community
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11576 (URN)000281825400291 ()
Conference
WENR conference, Rotterdam, Nederländerna
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2016-02-22Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Berglund, A.-L., Larsson, M. & Athlin, E. (2009). Nurses perceptions of talking about sexuality with cancer patients. Paper presented at ICN 24th Quadrennial Congress, Leading Change: Building Heathier Nations, Durban, South Africa, 27/6-4/7-2009. Paper presented at ICN 24th Quadrennial Congress, Leading Change: Building Heathier Nations, Durban, South Africa, 27/6-4/7-2009.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses perceptions of talking about sexuality with cancer patients
2009 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-11173 (URN)
Conference
ICN 24th Quadrennial Congress, Leading Change: Building Heathier Nations, Durban, South Africa, 27/6-4/7-2009
Available from: 2012-02-08 Created: 2012-02-08 Last updated: 2015-08-03Bibliographically approved
Olsson, C., Larsson, M. & Berglund, A.-L. (2008). Nurses perceptions of talking about sexuality with cancer patients (POSTER). In: : . Paper presented at 6th EONS Spring Convention, Genève, 27-29 mars, 2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses perceptions of talking about sexuality with cancer patients (POSTER)
2008 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sexuality is a part of every human beings identity and it has a varying meaning for the individual person. The ability to love and feel loved is an important part of good health. People suffering from cancer often experience sexual problems due to several reasons.

The purpose of this study was to describe nurses’ perception of talking to cancer patients about sexuality and their experiences of what sexuality means for cancer patients.

A qualitative method with a phenomenographic approach was used. Ten nurses from different clinics, who met patients in various places during the trajectory of care were interviewed.

The nurses’ perceptions are captured in two main categories and six descriptive categories. The first of the two main categories Obstacles and possibilities for the conversation describe the necessary conditions for the dialog together with three descriptive categories: Nurse’s professionalism and individual maturity, Interaction and relationship between the nurse and the patient, and The meaning of the surrounding structure. The second of the two main categories was The cancer patients’ need for support and information. It describes the nurses’ perceptions of how the patients’ need for support and information about sexuality varies during the trajectory of care. Descriptive categories to this main category were: The situation of life, The position in the trajectory of care and its meaning, and Consequences of the illness and its treatment.

Conclusions: Alteration in cancer patients sexuality is a recognised problem related to the disease and its treatment. Sexuality is also a neglected aspect of cancer care. This study highlights that nurses have varied perceptions of talking about sexuality with cancer patients. Therefore knowledge in this area and competence are needed. 

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-12556 (URN)
Conference
6th EONS Spring Convention, Genève, 27-29 mars, 2008
Available from: 2012-03-27 Created: 2012-03-27 Last updated: 2015-12-28Bibliographically approved
Henricson, M., Berglund, A.-L., Määttä, S., Ekman, R. & Segesten, K. (2008). The outcome of tactile touch on oxytocin in intensive care patients: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17(19), 2624-2633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The outcome of tactile touch on oxytocin in intensive care patients: a randomized controlled trial
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 19, p. 2624-2633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To explore the effects of five-day tactile touch intervention on oxytocin in intensive care patients. The hypotheses were that tactile touch increases the levels of oxytocin after intervention and over a six-day period. Background. Research on both humans and animals shows a correlation between touch and increased levels of oxytocin which inspired us to measure the levels of oxytocin in arterial blood to obtain information about the physiological effect of tactile touch. Design. Randomised controlled trial. Method. Forty-four patients from two general intensive care units, were randomly assigned to either tactile touch ( n = 21) or standard treatment – an hour of rest ( n = 23). Arterial blood was drawn for measurement of oxytocin, before and after both treatments. Results. No significant mean changes in oxytocin levels were found from day 1 to day 6 in the intervention group (mean −3·0 pM, SD 16·8). In the control group, there was a significant ( p = 0·01) decrease in oxytocin levels from day 1 to day 6, mean 26·4 pM (SD 74·1). There were no significant differences in changes between day 1 and day 6 when comparing the intervention group and control group, mean 23·4 pM (95% CI −20·2–67·0). Conclusion. Our hypothesis that tactile touch increases the levels of oxytocin in patients at intensive care units was not confirmed. An interesting observation was the decrease levels of oxytocin over the six-day period in the control group, which was not observed in the intervention group. Relevance to clinical practice. Tactile touch seemed to reduce the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Further and larger studies are needed in intensive care units to confirm/evaluate tactile touch as a complementary caring act for critically ill patients.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2047 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02324.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-27 Created: 2008-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Henricson, M., Berglund, A.-L., Määttä, S., Ekman, R. & Segesten, K. (2008). The outcome of tactile touch on oxytocin in intensive care patients: a randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Nursing 2008;17:2624-2633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The outcome of tactile touch on oxytocin in intensive care patients: a randomized trial
Show others...
2008 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing 2008;17:2624-2633Article in journal (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-24653 (URN)
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2013-01-22
Henricson, M., Ersson, A., Määttä, S., Segesten, K. & Berglund, A.-L. (2008). The outcome of tactile touch on stress parameters in intensive care: A randomized controlled trial. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 2008;14:244-254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The outcome of tactile touch on stress parameters in intensive care: A randomized controlled trial
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2008 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 2008;14:244-254Article in journal (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-24654 (URN)
Available from: 2013-01-22 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2013-01-22
Henricson, M., Ersson, A., Määttä, S., Segesten, K. & Berglund, A.-L. (2008). The outcome of tactile touch on stress parameters in intensive care: a randomized controlled trial. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 14(4), 244-254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The outcome of tactile touch on stress parameters in intensive care: a randomized controlled trial
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2008 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 244-254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aimed to investigate the effects of a five-day tactile touch intervention in order to find new and unconventional measures to moderate the detrimental influence of patients’ stressors during intensive care. The hypothesis was that tactile touch would decrease stress indicators such as anxiety, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, heart rate and requirements of sedative drugs and noradrenalin. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken with 44 patients, which were assigned either to tactile touch or standard treatment (a rest hour). Observations of the stress indicators were made before, during and after the intervention or standard treatment. The study showed that tactile touch led to significantly lower levels of anxiety. The circulatory parameters suggested increased circulatory stability indicated by a reduction in noradrenalin requirement. The results need to be further validated through studies with larger sample sizes.

Keywords
Tactile touch, Nursing, Stress, Intensive care, Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-2048 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2008.03.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-05-27 Created: 2008-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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