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Wagnsson, Stefan, DocentORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0311-7979
Biography [eng]

My research mainly focuses on child and youth sports, with a particular interest for young people's psychosoacial development, motivation for sport and parents' involvement in sport.

Biography [swe]

Min forskning riktar sig i huvudsak mot barn- och ungdomsidrott, med speciellt fokus på ungas psykosociala utveckling, motivation till idrott samt föräldrarnas engagemang inom idrotten.

Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Gustafsson, H., Hill, A., Stenling, A. & Wagnsson, S. (2016). Profiles of perfectionism, parental climate, and burnout among competitive junior athletes. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26(10), 1256-1264
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Profiles of perfectionism, parental climate, and burnout among competitive junior athletes
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1256-1264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research suggests that groups of athletes which differ in terms of perfectionism and perceptions of achievement climate can be identified. Moreover, these groups also differ in terms of burnout symptoms. The purpose of the current study was to extend this research by examining whether discernible groups can be identified based on scores of perfectionism and perceptions of parent-initiated climate and, then, whether these groups differ in terms of burnout. Two-hundred and thirty-seven Swedish junior athletes (124 males and 113 females aged 16-19) from a variety of sports completed measures of athlete burnout, multidimensional perfectionism, and parent-initiated motivational climate. Latent profile analysis identified four groups: non-perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, moderately perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, highly perfectionistic athletes in a task-involving climate, and highly perfectionistic athletes in a mixed climate. The latter two groups reported higher levels of burnout in comparison to other groups. The findings suggest that junior athletes high in perfectionism may be at comparatively greater risk to burnout and that this may especially be the case when they perceive their parents to emphasize concerns about failure and winning without trying one’s best.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Personality; motivation; performance; stress
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42460 (URN)10.1111/sms.12553 (DOI)000386937200015 ()26408202 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Wagnsson, S., Stenling, A., Gustafsson, H. & Augustsson, C. (2016). Swedish youth football players' attitudes towards moral decision in sport as predicted by the parent-initiated motivational climate. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 25, 110-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish youth football players' attitudes towards moral decision in sport as predicted by the parent-initiated motivational climate
2016 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 25, p. 110-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between late adolescent football players' perceptions of the motivational climate as initiated by mothers and fathers and attitudes towards moral decision making in sports. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Participants were 213 Swedish football players (144 males, 67 females) aged 16-19 years who completed measures assessing perceived parent-initiated motivational climate (i.e., success-without effort climate [SWEC]; worry conducive climate [WCC]; and learning/enjoyment climate [LEC]) and attitudes towards moral decision-making in sport (i.e., acceptance of cheating [AOC]; acceptance of gamesmanship [AOC.] and keeping winning in proportion [KWIP]). Results: Canonical correlations demonstrated moderate positive relations between parent initiated both mother and father performance climates (WCC and SWEC) and AOC and AOG. Moreover, the relationship between mother and father-initiated learning/enjoyment climate (LEC) were shown to be moderately and positively associated with the prosocial attitude dimension of KWIP. Results also showed that a mother-initiated LEC and a mother-initiated SWEC were stronger predictors of the criterion variables (AOC, AOG, and KWIP) than equivalent father-initiated climate dimensions. Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of considering the relationship between parent initiated climates especially initiated by mothers and the development of moral decision-making among youth football players.

Keywords
Youth sport, Parent, Motivational climate, Moral functioning, Attitudes
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-44656 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2016.05.003 (DOI)000379563600013 ()
Available from: 2016-08-12 Created: 2016-08-12 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Wagnsson, S. & Augustsson, C. (2015). Kommersiell idrott ger föräldrar huvudbry. Svensk idrottsforskning, 24(2), 22-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kommersiell idrott ger föräldrar huvudbry
2015 (Swedish)In: Svensk idrottsforskning, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2015
Keywords
Förädrar, barn, ungdomar, kommersialiserad, idrott
National Category
Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38168 (URN)
Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2016-06-02Bibliographically approved
Wagnsson, S., Lindwall, M. & Gustafsson, H. (2014). Participation in organized sport and self-esteem across adolescence: the mediating role of perceived sport competence. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), 36(6), 584-594
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation in organized sport and self-esteem across adolescence: the mediating role of perceived sport competence
2014 (English)In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 584-594Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to test longitudinal (2 years across three occasions) associations between sport participation (SP) and self-esteem (SE) across adolescence (10–18 years), addressing the mediating role of perceived sport competence (PSC) from a developmental perspective. Three waves of data were collected from three age cohorts (10–12, 13–15, and 16–18 years) of school-aged youth (N = 1358). The results demonstrate that SP and SE are related across time and that PSC has an important mediating role in this relationship, both from a skill development and a self-enhancement perspective. In the skill development model, the mediating role of PSC was significantly stronger in the youngest cohort whereas the effect of PSC on subsequent SP in the self-enhancement model was significantly stronger in the 13–15 age group compared with the youngest age group.

Keywords
youth sport, adolescence, skill development, self-enhancement
National Category
Other Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38163 (URN)10.1123/jsep.2013-0137 (DOI)000348491000004 ()25602141 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Wagnsson, S., Patriksson, G. & Carlman, P. (2014). The longitudinal changes of  participation and drop-out patterns inchildren and youth sports.. In: : . Paper presented at Congress of the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP). Auckland, New Zealand, 10-13 February, 2014..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The longitudinal changes of  participation and drop-out patterns inchildren and youth sports.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Since there is a widespread belief that sports contributes to a healthy development, coaches, parents and other representatives acting in the sport environment are often expressing a concern about the high drop-out rate in organized youth sports. However, drop-out decisions made by youths are not a static phenomenon (Patriksson, 1988). In order to be able to capture the mobility, the aim of the study was to examine longitudinal (2 years, 3 waves) changes of participation and drop-out patterns based on self-reports of 920 youth (10-18 years) from Sweden. Results showed that a vast majority (93%) of participants had, to some extent been involved in organized sports when entering the last wave. The participation rate decreased with 7% (75-68%) between 10-12 years, with 13% (66-53%) between 13-15 years and with 8% (42-34%) between 16-18 years. The attrition rate was highest between the ages of 14-16 (19%). Every year, a significant proportion (19%) of those who dropped out of sports returned. Almost a fifth of those who have dropped out of sports returned, but once again withdraw in the same year. A higher proportion of girls than boys (46% vs 37%) withdraw from sports. Further analyses revealed that it is primarily girls with foreign background who drops out. Results also showed that those who drop-out of sports to a larger extent are physical more active (twice a week or more) when compared with those who never have been involved in organized sports (64-66% vs 45-50%). The results are discussed in relation to longitudinal trends shown in previous research (e.g., Findlay, Garner & Kohen, 2009; Patriksson, 1988; Seippel, 2005) but also in relation to studies that have only used cross-sectional or retrospective designs (e.g., Butcher, Lindner & Johns, 2002).

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33857 (URN)
Conference
Congress of the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP). Auckland, New Zealand, 10-13 February, 2014.
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2014-09-29 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2015-12-28Bibliographically approved
Rolandsson, M., Wagnsson, S. & Hugoson, A. (2014). Tobacco use habits among Swedish female youth athletes and the influence of the social environment. International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 12(3), 219-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tobacco use habits among Swedish female youth athletes and the influence of the social environment
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study examined the prevalence of tobacco habits and the influence of the social environment among Swedish female athletes representing both individual and team sports in Sweden. Material and method: A self-reported cross-sectional survey was performed with 791 female athletes 15-24 years old representing ten of the most common sports in Sweden. The questions related to the participants' involvement in sports and their tobacco habits. Results: Findings revealed that a large proportion of the female athletes had never smoked (65%) or used snus (74%). However, a considerable portion of the participants had tried smoking (27%) or using snus (20%), especially those involved in team sports. Results also showed statistically significant associations between female athletes' smoking habits and those of both their mothers and their peers, but not with the tobacco habits of their coaches, indicating that coaches do not influence the female athletes' use of tobacco. Conclusion: In conclusion, this study indicated that the vast majority of female athletes did not use tobacco. A significant portion had sometimes tried tobacco, especially members of team sports, but this behaviour did not seem to be influenced by the tobacco habits of their coaches.

Keywords
athletes, gender, smokeless tobacco, smoking, snuff, snus, sports
National Category
Dentistry
Research subject
Dental Hygiene
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41513 (URN)10.1111/idh.12065 (DOI)000339432600011 ()24382360 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-08-16Bibliographically approved
Wagnsson, S., Augustsson, C. & Patriksson, G. (2013). Associations between sport involvement and youth psychosocial development in Sweden: a longitudinal study. Journal of Sport for Development, 1(1), 37-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between sport involvement and youth psychosocial development in Sweden: a longitudinal study
2013 (English)In: Journal of Sport for Development, ISSN 2330-0574, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a widespread belief that organized sport can be used as a tool for positive youth development. However, phenomena such as parental pressure, binge drinking, doping, bullying and marginalization are also present within the sport milieu, with potential risks for negative outcomes to occur. The aim of the present study was to examine the longitudinal effects of organized sport involvement on indicators of youth psychosocial development over 24 months. Surveys assessing reported sport involvement and psychosocial development indicators were carried out at baseline (T1), 12 months (T2), and 24 months (T3). The results, based on self-reports of 920 youth, ages 10-18 years from Sweden, showed strong evidence of an association between baseline sports involvement and end line selfesteem (SE) (r=.15; p<.001), perceived physical competence (PPC) (r=.47; p<.001), and social competence (PSC) (r=.21; p<.001), reported grades (GRAD) (r=.13; p<.001) and alcohol use (ALC) (r=.10; p=.016). After adjusting for selection effects (i.e. dropping out of sport) and prior level outcomes, the effects of sport involvement on indicators of youths’ psychosocial development used in this study, were in general negligible (SE=.05, p=.20;PSC=.05, p=.20;GRAD=.04, p=.60;ALC=.03, p=.49) except for PPC (PPC=.14, p<.001). The results of this study highlight the importance of using longitudinal studies that account for variances explained by prior level outcomes, sociodemographic variables and dropouts from sports.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
United States: Vera Solutions, Benefit LLC, 2013
Keywords
Children, Adolescents, Psychosocial Development, Organized Sport, Involvement
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-29494 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-15 Created: 2013-10-15 Last updated: 2015-01-29Bibliographically approved
Carlman, P., Wagnsson, S. & Patriksson, G. (2013). Causes and consequences of dropping out from organized youth sports. Swedish Journal of Sport Research, 2(1), 26-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Causes and consequences of dropping out from organized youth sports
2013 (English)In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 26-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to examine dropout reasons and various types ofdropouts in relation to demographic variables, various types of sports, physicalactivity, and underlying motivational processes. Retrospective data was collected fromthree cohorts including 1,176 participants, of which 712 stated that they hadsometimes dropped out of organized sport. Findings showed that time-related reasonswere the primary causes for dropping out. It was also revealed that athletes with lowversus high levels of perceived physical competence dropped out to a higher extentbecause of experiencing too much pressure, and athletes reporting low versus highsocial competence withdrew to a higher extent because they did not like theirteammates. Results also showed that girls with a foreign background had a higher rateof dropouts compared to boys with the same background. Girls with foreignbackgrounds were also found to be less physically active after dropping out fromorganized sports.

Keywords
Dropout, surface, underlying reasons, competence, physical activity
National Category
Health Sciences Social Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33855 (URN)
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2014-09-29 Created: 2014-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, H., Skoog, T., Podlog, L., Lundqvist, C. & Wagnsson, S. (2013). Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators. Psychology of Sport And Exercise, 14(5), 640-649
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hope and athlete burnout: Stress and affect as mediators
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 640-649Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

Methods

Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15–19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

Results

Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

Conclusion

The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome.

Keywords
Coaching, Elite athletes, Emotions, Overtraining, Stress management, Positive
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-13204 (URN)10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.03.008 (DOI)000324454500006 ()
Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, H., Hill, A., Stenling, A. & Wagnsson, S. (2013). The interaction betweenperfectionism and parent-initiated climate when predicting burnout among juniorcompetitive athletes. In: The 13th ISSP World congress in sport psychology, Beijing, China, June, 2013.: . Paper presented at The 13th ISSP World congress in sport psychology, Beijing, China, June, 2013..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The interaction betweenperfectionism and parent-initiated climate when predicting burnout among juniorcompetitive athletes
2013 (English)In: The 13th ISSP World congress in sport psychology, Beijing, China, June, 2013., 2013Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-29500 (URN)
Conference
The 13th ISSP World congress in sport psychology, Beijing, China, June, 2013.
Available from: 2013-10-15 Created: 2013-10-15 Last updated: 2015-01-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0311-7979

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