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Kallman, U., Kimberly, L. B. & Bååth, C. (2019). Swedish translation and validation of the international skin tear advisory panel skin tear classification system. International Wound Journal, 16(1), 13-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish translation and validation of the international skin tear advisory panel skin tear classification system
2019 (English)In: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 13-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aims of this study were to translate the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP) classification system for skin tears into Swedish and to validate the translated system. The research process consisted of two phases. Phase I involved the translation of the classification system, using the forward-back translation method, and a consensus survey. The survey dictated that the best Swedish translation for "skin tear" was "hudfliksskada." In Phase 2, the classification system was validated by health care professionals attending a wound care conference held in the spring of 2017 in Sweden. Thirty photographs representing three types of skin tear were presented to participants in random order. Participants were directed to classify the skin tear types in a data collection sheet. The results indicated a moderate level of agreement on classification of skin tears by type. Achieving moderate agreement for the ISTAP skin tear tool is an important milestone as it demonstrates the validity and reliability of the tool. Skin tear classification typing is a complex skill that requires training and time to develop. More education is required for all health care specialists on the classification of skin tears.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71083 (URN)10.1111/iwj.12975 (DOI)000455535100003 ()30191655 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Madsen, U. R., Bååth, C., Berthelsen, C. B. & Hommel, A. (2018). A prospective study of short-term functional outcome after dysvascular major lower limb amputation. International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 28, 22-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prospective study of short-term functional outcome after dysvascular major lower limb amputation
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 28, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates functional status on Day 21 after dysvascular major lower limb amputation compared with one month pre-amputation and evaluates factors potentially influencing outcome. Methods: A prospective cohort study design was used. Data were collected via in-person interviews using structured instruments and covered functional level (Barthel index 100) one month pre-amputation and on Day 21. Out of a consecutive sample of patients having major lower limb amputation (tibia, knee or femoral) (n = 105), 51 participated on Day 21 follow-up. Clinical, demographic, body function and environmental data were analysed as factors potentially influencing outcome. Results: From pre-amputation to Day 21, participants' functional level decreased significantly in all ten activities of daily living activities as measured by the Barthel Index. Almost 60% of participants were independent in bed-chair transfer on Day 21. Being independent in transfer on Day 21 was positively associated with younger age and attending physiotherapy after discharge. Conclusions: The findings indicate that short-term functional outcome is modifiable by quality of the postoperative care provided and thus highlights the need for increased focus on postoperative care to maintain basic function as well as establish and provide everyday rehabilitation in the general population of patients who have dysvascular lower limb amputations.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66780 (URN)10.1016/j.ijotn.2017.08.001 (DOI)000426345600005 ()28866377 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-22 Created: 2018-03-22 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Madsen, U. R., Bååth, C., Berthelsen, C. B. & Hommel, A. (2018). Age and health-related quality of life, general self-efficacy, and functional level 12 months following dysvascular major lower limb amputation: a prospective longitudinal study. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age and health-related quality of life, general self-efficacy, and functional level 12 months following dysvascular major lower limb amputation: a prospective longitudinal study
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study investigates the effect of time and age on health-related quality of life, general self-efficacy, and functional level 12 months following dysvascular major lower limb amputation (LLA). Methods: A prospective cohort study design with assessments at baseline and follow-up 3, 6, and 12 months post-amputation. Data were collected via in-person interviews using Short Form 36, the General Self-efficacy scale and Barthel Index 100. Out of a consecutive sample of 103 patients having dysvascular major LLA (tibia, knee, or femoral), 38 patients completed the study. Outcome at follow-up was compared with baseline and analyzed in age groups. Results: All SF36 subscale scores were below population norms at baseline. At 12 months, two out of eight scores—physical function and role-physical—had not improved. Different patterns of change over the 12 months were detected among the subscales, and psychosocial problems persisted and fluctuated throughout the 12 months in all age groups. Large differences were identified between age groups in physical function with the loss of physical function almost solely evident among the oldest (aged 75+ years) patients. Conclusions: Special attention should be given to the oldest patients need for rehabilitation so that they gain higher quality of life.Implications for rehabilitationPsychosocial problems persist and fluctuate throughout the first 12 months after major LLAs in all age groups and rehabilitation services should include psychosocial support throughout the first year to all patients independent of age.Waiting for an unnecessarily long period of time for a prosthesis can negatively impact both physical and psychosocial aspects of health-related QOL, and interventions to reduce waiting time are warranted.Differences between age groups in functional level after 12 months exist, with the loss of function almost solely evident among the oldest patients (aged 75+ years). A special focus should be given to the oldest patients’ need of everyday rehabilitation to regain basic physical functions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Dysvascular amputation, functional level, General Self-Efficacy, Health-Related QOL, lower limb amputation, non-traumatic amputation
National Category
Clinical Medicine Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69025 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2018.1480668 (DOI)2-s2.0-85049169082 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gunningberg, L., Bååth, C. & Sving, E. (2018). Staff's perceptions of a pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injuries in a hospital ward: A qualitative study. Journal of Nursing Management, 26(2), 140-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staff's perceptions of a pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injuries in a hospital ward: A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 140-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To describe staff's perceptions of a continuous pressure mapping system to prevent pressure injury in a hospital ward. Background: Pressure injury development is still a problem in hospitals. It is important to understand how new information and communication technologies can facilitate pressure injury prevention. Method: A descriptive design with qualitative focus group interviews was used. Results: Five categories were identified: “Need of information, training and coaching over a long period of time,” “Pressure mapping – a useful tool in the prevention of pressure injury in high risk patients,” “Easy to understand and use, but some practical issues were annoying,” “New way of working and thinking,” and “Future possibilities with the pressure mapping system.”. Conclusion: The pressure mapping system was an eye-opener for the importance of pressure injury prevention. Staff appreciated the real-time feedback on pressure points, which alerted them to the time for repositioning, facilitated repositioning and provided feedback on the repositioning performed. Implications for Nursing Management: A continuous pressure mapping system can be used as a catalyst, increasing staff's competence, focus and awareness of prevention. For successful implementation, the nurse managers should have a shared agenda with the clinical nurse leaders, supporting the sustaining and spread of the innovation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
hospital, pressure injury, pressure mapping, prevention, qualitative research, staff, accident prevention, adult, article, awareness, catalyst, disease course, high risk patient, human, interview, leadership, nurse manager, nursing management, perception, risk assessment, thinking, ward
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66910 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12526 (DOI)2-s2.0-85043698341 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Gunningberg, L., Sving, E., Hommel, A., Ålenius, C., Wiger, P. & Bååth, C. (2018). Tracking pressure injuries as adverse events: National use of the Global Trigger Tool over a 4-year period. Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, 25(1), 21-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracking pressure injuries as adverse events: National use of the Global Trigger Tool over a 4-year period
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To examine the frequency, preventability, and consequences of hospital acquired pressure injuries in acute care hospitals over a 4-year period. Method: A retrospective record review was performed using the Swedish version of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). A total of 64 917 hospital admissions were reviewed. Data were collected between 2013 and 2016 from all 63 Swedish acute care hospitals. Results: The prevalence of pressure injuries (category 2-4) was 1%. Older patients, "satellite patients", and patients with acute admissions had more pressure injuries. Most pressure injuries (91%) were determined to be preventable. The mean extended length of hospital stay was 15.8 days for patients who developed pressure injuries during hospitalization. Conclusion: The GTT provides a useful and complementary national perspective on hospital acquired pressure injuries across hospitals, informing health care providers on safety priorities to reduce patient harm. Clinical leaders can use information on the preventability and the consequences of pressure injuries, as well as evidence-based arguments for improving the health care organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Adverse events, Global Trigger Tool, Patient safety, Pressure injury
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69056 (URN)10.1111/jep.12996 (DOI)000455270400004 ()2-s2.0-85050364749 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Gesar, B., Bååth, C., Hedin, H. & Hommel, A. (2017). Hip fracture; an interruption that has consequences four months later: A qualitative study. International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 26, 43-48, Article ID S1878-1241(16)30100-9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hip fracture; an interruption that has consequences four months later: A qualitative study
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 26, p. 43-48, article id S1878-1241(16)30100-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Effects following a hip fracture often lead to functional disabilities and increased dependence on others. Although persons sustaining a hip fracture constitute a heterogeneous group in Swedish health care, they tend to be treated as a homogenous one.

AIM: The aim of this study was to reveal how previously healthy people, aged 65 years and older, described how they had adapted to daily life four months after a hip fracture.

METHOD: The follow-up interviews were performed by the first author four months after the hip fracture. Data were analysed using conventional inductive content analysis.

FINDINGS: The results from the interviews highlight that sustaining a hip fracture - even four months later - was seen by the participants as an interruption leading to lasting consequences for everyday life. The recovery process during this period was complex and consisted of both physical and psychological strain. Some were resigned, some strived in order to regain independence and some handled the situation by means of self-confidence and self-efficacy.

CONCLUSION: Previous healthy and independently-living participants described, in different ways that the hip fracture was an interruption that still affected everyday life. The absence of psychological support may be one of the reasons for dependency after four months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Content analysis, Healthy individuals, Hip fractures, Patients personal experiences, Recovery of function
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-56730 (URN)10.1016/j.ijotn.2017.04.002 (DOI)000418121300008 ()28527900 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-07-03 Created: 2017-07-03 Last updated: 2019-08-02Bibliographically approved
Gesar, B., Hommel, A., Hedin, H. & Bååth, C. (2017). Older patients' perception of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function after hip fracture surgery: an explorative qualitative study. International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, 24, 50-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older patients' perception of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function after hip fracture surgery: an explorative qualitative study
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 24, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore healthy older patients' perceptions of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function in the acute phase following hip fracture surgery.

BACKGROUND: The incidence of hip fractures is expected to increase. In Sweden, of the patients who sustain a hip fracture, 40 per cent are healthy and lived independently pre fracture. However, a hip fracture often results in declined functional outcomes for 40 per cent of these patients.

DESIGN: The study had an explorative inductive qualitative design.

METHODS: Semi-structured interviews (n = 30) were conducted two to five days after hip fracture surgery. Data were analysed using manifest inductive content analysis.

RESULTS: As a description of patients' perception of their own capacity to regain pre-fracture function after a hip fracture, one main category emerged: To end up in a new situation with or without control. Patients expressed that they believed in recovery and thought nothing would be altered. However, since they had to adapt to the ward culture at the acute hospital, they became passive and became insecure about their future life situation.

CONCLUSION: The attitudes of staff at the acute hospital can influence the outcome for hip fracture patients. Patients believe in recovery but do not receive psychological support to regain physical capacity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Acute care; Content analysis; Healthy patients; Hip fracture; Hospital care; Patient-centred care; Patient experiences
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-45783 (URN)10.1016/j.ijotn.2016.04.005 (DOI)000390590700007 ()27554953 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-06 Created: 2016-09-06 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Hommel, A., Gunningberg, L., Idvall, E. & Bååth, C. (2017). Successful factors to prevent pressure ulcers - an interview study.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(1-2), 182-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Successful factors to prevent pressure ulcers - an interview study.
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 1-2, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore successful factors to prevent pressure ulcers in hospital settings.

BACKGROUND: Pressure ulcer prevalence has been recognised as a quality indicator for both patient safety and quality of care in hospital and community settings. Most pressure ulcer can be prevented if effective measures are implemented and evaluated. The Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions initiated nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence studies in 2011. In 2014, after four years of measurement, the prevalence was still unacceptably high on a national level. The mean prevalence of pressure ulcer in the spring of 2014 was 14% in hospital settings with a range from 2·7-36·4%.

DESIGN: Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted.

METHODS: A qualitative content analysis, in addition to Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services frameworks, was used in the analysis of the data text. Individual interviews and focus groups were used to create opportunities for both individual responses and group interactions. The study was conducted at six hospitals during the fall of 2014.

RESULTS: Three main categories were identified as successful factors to prevent pressure ulcer in hospitals: creating a good organisation, maintaining persistent awareness and realising the benefits for patients.

CONCLUSION: The goal for all healthcare personnel must be delivering high-quality, sustainable care to patients. Prevention of pressure ulcer is crucial in this work. It seems to be easier for small hospitals (with a low number of units/beds) to develop and sustain an effective organisation in prevention work.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The nurse managers' attitude and engagement are crucial to enable the personnel to work actively with pressure ulcer prevention. Strategies are proposed to advance clinical leadership, knowledge, skills and abilities for the crucial implementation of pressure ulcer prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
Keywords
evidence-based practice, leadership, nurse's responsibilities, pressure ulcer, qualitative study, quality and safety, work organisation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-48080 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13465 (DOI)000396472700017 ()27378536 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-06 Created: 2017-03-06 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Madsen, U. R., Hommel, A., Berthelsen, C. B. & Bååth, C. (2017). Systematic review describing the effect of early mobilisation after dysvascular major lower limb amputations. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 26(21-22), 3286-3297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic review describing the effect of early mobilisation after dysvascular major lower limb amputations
2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 21-22, p. 3286-3297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives. To assess the effect of early mobilisation of patients after dysvascular lower limb amputation and to compare the effectiveness of different mobilisation regimens. Background. Patients who have undergone dysvascular major lower limb amputations are at high risk of postoperative complications, which include loss of basic functions, and early mobilisation interventions might prevent these complications. Design. Systematic review. Methods. Systematic searches were performed on PubMed (including MEDLINE), CINAHL and EMBASE databases to identify studies investigating the effects of (early) mobilisation interventions in dysvascular lower limb-amputated patients. Data collection and quality assessment were performed using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care Review Group data collection checklist and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, respectively. Results. Five studies were included in the review: four pre- to post-case studies and one randomised controlled study. However, none of these studies were of high quality. Four studies investigated early mobilisation promoted by immediate postoperative prosthesis. One study investigated whether reorganizing care increases mobilisation and thereby functional outcome. Conclusions. This systematic review reveals a lack of evidence to determine whether early mobilisation interventions are beneficial to this vulnerable patient group. Nevertheless, ambulation from the first postoperative day with temporary prosthesis is possible among the heterogeneous population of dysvascular lower limb-amputated patients if the necessary interdisciplinary team is dedicated to the task. Relevance to clinical practice. Mobilisation is a fundamental care task often missed for several reasons. Moreover, mobilisation of the newly amputated patient is complex, and knowledge of effective strategies to promote postoperative mobilisation in this vulnerable population is desired. Nurses are urged to take responsibility for this fundamental care task and to engage the necessary collaborative interdisciplinary team to develop, implement and evaluate ambitious early mobilisation interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65934 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13716 (DOI)000417389400004 ()28042882 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsen Grøndahl, V., Persenius, M., Bååth, C. & Helgesen, A. K. (2017). The use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia, their relatives and staff: A systematic mixed studies review. BMC Nursing, 16(28), Article ID 28.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia, their relatives and staff: A systematic mixed studies review
2017 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, no 28, article id 28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Dementia is an important predictor of nursing home admissions. Due to progressive dementia symptoms, over time it becomes difficult for persons with dementia to communicate their wishes and participate in decisions concerning their everyday lives. Their well-being, sense of dignity, integrity and personhood are at risk. The persons' life stories have been highlighted as particularly important in dementia care and are referred to as seeing the person beyond the dementia. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the use of life stories and its influence on persons with dementia living in nursing homes, their relatives and staff.

METHODS: A systematic mixed studies review was conducted. The literature searches were performed in the following databases: CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO and the Cochrane library, as well as by hand searching references in the studies included. An updated search was performed eight months after the first search. Data was synthesised inspired by integrative analysis.

RESULTS: Three studies using quantitative design and two studies (presented in three papers) using qualitative design representing research from 2006 to 2015 were included in the review. Life stories generally had a positive influence on the persons with dementia, their relatives, and staff. The use of life stories might contribute to 'Maintenance of the person with dementia as a whole person rather than a demented patient'. On the other hand, enabling persons with dementia to tell their own story could be a challenge. For the staff it could be challenging when sensitive information emerged uninvited. Involving relatives could also be difficult as to whose story were uncovered.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of person's life story might be of significance, but there is not enough evidence to make any statement about its importance as the research is scarce. Studies, including randomised controlled trials, are needed to measure the impact of life story work on the physiological and psychological aspects of persons with dementia, and also how it influences their relatives and staff.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Dementia, Life stories, Nursing home, Systematic mixed studies review
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-62672 (URN)10.1186/s12912-017-0223-5 (DOI)000403288500002 ()28588424 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-02Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9608-336X

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