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Publications (10 of 167) Show all publications
Skarin, F., Olsson, L. E., Friman, M. & Wästlund, E. (2019). Importance of motives, self-efficacy, social support and satisfaction with travel for behavior change during travel intervention programs. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 62, 451-458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of motives, self-efficacy, social support and satisfaction with travel for behavior change during travel intervention programs
2019 (English)In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 62, p. 451-458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present field study investigates the reduction of car use through a voluntary travelbehavior intervention program that provides participants with temporary free publictransportation. Three factors – self-efficacy, social support and satisfaction – have previ-ously been shown to be important for behavior change during physical activity interven-tion programs. In travel behavior interventions, however, these factors have often beenstudied individually and less is known about their combined effects on travel behaviorchange. Furthermore, while motives for participating in travel behavior interventions havebeen frequently studied within travel behavior interventions research, there is a lack ofstudies investigating the influence of motives on travel behavior change. To better under-stand the importance of different motives as well as the importance of self-efficacy, socialsupport, and satisfaction with travel on behavior change, a series of surveys were admin-istered to 181 participants before, during, and after their participation in a voluntary travelbehavior intervention. The results show that greater self-efficacy and social support duringthe intervention led to greater travel behavior change. These results indicate that in orderto gain better results from travel behavior interventions, individuals should be helped toincrease their travel-related self-efficacy, and significant others should be involved to pro-vide social support. We discuss possible ways of accomplishing this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71179 (URN)10.1016/j.trf.2019.02.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Friman, M., Rosenbaum, M. & Otterbring, T. (2019). The relationship between exchanged resources and loyalty intentions. Service Industries Journal
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between exchanged resources and loyalty intentions
2019 (English)In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

his research aims to revive the applicability of the exchange concept in the marketing domain. The authors draw on current exchange theories to show how members of an aquatic center receive relational, social support, and restorative resources from other center members and employees. They then empirically demonstrate that members’ loyalty to the center is fueled by the resources they receive from others in the center and that their experience in the center mediates the relationship between exchanged resources and member loyalty. This research reveals that service organizations may foster person-place bonds by providing customers with resources over and above goods and services. Customers appreciate resources that transform their well-being, such as social support and natural, restorative resources, and they demonstrate loyalty to places where they can obtain therapeutic resources. From a theoretical standpoint, this work shows support for the notion that the exchange concept is a foundational aspect of a general theory of marketing and explains how the exchange and value concepts in marketing are linked together.

Keywords
Exchange concept, REPLACE framework, transformative sport service research, attention restoration theory, transformative service research
National Category
Business Administration Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Business Administration; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71181 (URN)10.1080/02642069.2018.1561875 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-21Bibliographically approved
Gärling, T., Bamberg, S. & Friman, M. (2019). The role of attitude in choice of travel, satisfaction with travel, and change to sustainable travel (2ed.). In: Albarracin, D Johnson, BT (Ed.), Handbook of attitudes: vol 2: applications (pp. 562-586). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of attitude in choice of travel, satisfaction with travel, and change to sustainable travel
2019 (English)In: Handbook of attitudes: vol 2: applications / [ed] Albarracin, D Johnson, BT, Routledge, 2019, 2, p. 562-586Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019 Edition: 2
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71730 (URN)000461334100018 ()9781138037052 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-05 Created: 2019-04-05 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Rosenbaum, M., Friman, M., Otterbring, T. & Contreras, G. (2019). The Wegman’s Effect: When a Service Organization Provides Customers with Restorative and Relational Resources. In: : . Paper presented at QUIS16 June 10-13, 2019 in Karlstad, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Wegman’s Effect: When a Service Organization Provides Customers with Restorative and Relational Resources
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71184 (URN)
Conference
QUIS16 June 10-13, 2019 in Karlstad, Sweden
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Olsson, L. E. & Friman, M. (2019). Vad avgör om man samåker eller inte?. In: : . Paper presented at Transportforum 2019, Linköping.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad avgör om man samåker eller inte?
2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-71185 (URN)
Conference
Transportforum 2019, Linköping
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Lättman, K., Olsson, L. E. & Friman, M. (2018). A new approach to accessibility – Examining perceived accessibility in contrast to objectively measured accessibility in daily travel. Research in Transportation Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new approach to accessibility – Examining perceived accessibility in contrast to objectively measured accessibility in daily travel
2018 (English)In: Research in Transportation Economics, ISSN 0739-8859, E-ISSN 1875-7979Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Accessibility has conventionally been measured and evaluated ignoring user perceptions in favor of focusing on travel time and distance to a number of pre-determined destinations. Acknowledging this gap, we recently developed a scale for perceived accessibility PAC (Lättman, Friman, & Olsson 2016b) aimed at capturing the individual perspective of accessibility with a certain travel mode. In this paper, we 1) further develop the PAC measure of perceived accessibility in order to capture how easy it is to live a satisfactory life with the help of the transport system, 2) compare levels of perceived accessibility between residential areas and main travel modes, and 3) compare residents’ perceived accessibility to the objective accessibility level for the same residential area. Data from 2711 residents of Malmö, Sweden show that perceived accessibility is consistently different from objective accessibility across 13 residential areas, with minor differences in levels of perceived accessibility between areas. Surprisingly, bicycle users rate their accessibility significantly higher than those who mainly use the car or public transport for daily travel, contrary to objective accessibility assumptions. These differences point at the importance of including perceived accessibility as a complementary tool when planning for and evaluating transport systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Perceived accessibility;Accessibility; Accessibility measure; Transport planning; Sustainable transport
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68045 (URN)10.1016/j.retrec.2018.06.002 (DOI)000454975000058 ()
Projects
MistraSAMS
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2019-02-14Bibliographically approved
Friman, M., Westman, J. & Olsson, L. E. (2018). Children’s Life Satisfaction and Satisfaction with School Travel. Child Indicators Research, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children’s Life Satisfaction and Satisfaction with School Travel
2018 (English)In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

To understand children’s experiences of their daily travel, and the consequences of these experiences, it is essential that we directly address children. The Satisfaction with Travel Scale (STS) is a self-report instrument consisting of nine items divided into three subscales – two reflecting affective travel experiences and one reflecting cognitive travel experiences. The present study has two aims: (i) to examine the psychometric properties of a child version of the STS (referred to as the STS-C), and (ii) to test a potentially positive relationship between travel satisfaction and life satisfaction among children, something which has been found among adults. Three hundred and forty-five children completed the STS-C, life satisfaction scales, and sociodemographic variables. Analyses using Partial Least Square structural equation modelling revealed that the STS-C was internally reliable, had a sound construct validity, and confirmed a one-factor second-order measurement model with three first-order constructs (subscales). Furthermore, children’s satisfaction with school travel was also significantly related to their life satisfaction as measured by their satisfaction with: themselves, school experiences, friendships, family, and living environment. The relationship between travel satisfaction and life satisfaction varied between modes, whereby it was stronger among those who traveled by active modes than those who traveled by school bus or car. Younger children and boys were more satisfied with their travel to school, something which also had an indirect effect on their life satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Satisfaction with travel scale, Children’s travel, Children’s life satisfaction, Affect, School travel
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70225 (URN)10.1007/s12187-018-9584-x (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-21 Created: 2018-11-21 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved
Waygood, E. O., Friman, M., Taniguchi, A. & Olsson, L. E. (2018). Children's life satisfaction and travel satisfaction: Evidence from Canada, Japan, and Sweden. Travel Behaviour & Society, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's life satisfaction and travel satisfaction: Evidence from Canada, Japan, and Sweden
2018 (English)In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Travel satisfaction has been linked to life satisfaction for adults, but no evidence exists currently for children's travel. Children's travel differs from adult's in numerous ways including limitations related to independent travel and available transport options. Children's travel is often more local and their desire to explore and learn about their environment may be higher than for adults. The importance of social interaction during travel or at locations may also be a greater consideration for children. Further, many of their destinations are pre-determined such as going to school (not all adults work, but nearly all children of school age attend school). This paper analyzes the relationship between travel satisfaction and life satisfaction for children aged 9–12 in Canada, Japan, and Sweden (n = 425) using partial least squares structural equation modeling. In line with previous findings among adults, the analyses show a significant path from travel satisfaction to life satisfaction among children, suggesting a moderate relationship. Unexpectedly, negative relationships for increased frequency of nearly all mode uses (walking, bus, and car) on travel satisfaction (directly) and life satisfaction (indirectly) were found, which may suggest that children do not enjoy frequent travel. These results suggest a relationship that is likely important, but not necessarily in the ways anticipated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Children, Everyday travel, Life satisfaction, Satisfaction with travel
National Category
Sociology Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67404 (URN)10.1016/j.tbs.2018.04.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046661396 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-07-26Bibliographically approved
Gärling, T. & Friman, M. (2018). Economic and psychological determinants of ownership, use and changes in use of private cars (2ed.). In: Alan Lewis (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour: (pp. 567-594). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Economic and psychological determinants of ownership, use and changes in use of private cars
2018 (English)In: The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour / [ed] Alan Lewis, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, 2, p. 567-594Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we first address two questions: why are automobiles purchased, and why are automobiles, after being purchased, used to such a large extent? We argue that instrumental and economic factors (including time savings) play important roles. Yet, psychological factors appear to also play a decisive role. Following a brief overview of factors accounting for the unprecedented historical increase in automobile ownership (Section 19.2), determinants of private car use will be analysed in the following section, 19.3. Substantial environmental and societal costs of private car use such as congestion, noise, air pollution, excessive land use crowding out other uses and depletion of material and energy resources are expected future consequences of the worldwide increasing trend in automobile ownership and use (Goodwin, 1996; Greene and Wegener, 1997; van Wee, 2012, 2014). In many urban areas, these consequences are already being felt, leading to various policy measures for reducing or changing private car use being placed high on the political agendas. In Section 19.4, we describe and classify a number of such policy measures. Following this classification, we review in the same section evidence of the policy measures’ effectiveness, public acceptability and political feasibility. Historical Trends in Private Car Ownership and Use The automobile has drastically altered the development of the world like few other human inventions. In the developed countries, and now in developing countries, its versatility strongly contributes to why it is chosen for urban, suburban and rural travel (Jakobsson, 2007). Versatility (in this chapter, referred to as instrumental motives) is, however, not a sufficient explanation. As will be argued, the automobile is also chosen because it is fun to drive and ride, provides privacy and security and signals social status (Gatersleben, 2007, 2014; Stradling, 2002). Even though cars were available at the beginning of the twentieth century, it was only in the years after World War II with the subsequent spread of affluence and the acceleration of automobile mass production that ownership was brought within the reach of a majority of households in the industrialised world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018 Edition: 2
Keywords
Applied Psychology, Economics
National Category
Applied Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Economic History
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68077 (URN)10.1017/9781316676349.020 (DOI)2-s2.0-85048161445 (Scopus ID)9781316676349 (ISBN)9781107161399 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-06-26 Created: 2018-06-26 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Friman, M., Gärling, T. & Ettema, D. (2018). Improvement of public transport services for non-cycling travelers. Travel Behaviour & Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of public transport services for non-cycling travelers
2018 (English)In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we argue that the current focus on cycling must not neglect the need to improve public transport services for the large number of people who do not want to or are unable to cycle. An attractive public transport service is currently therefore the most important component of a sustainable transportation system. The question we address is what measures are needed to improve public transport to make people who do not cycle satisfied with the services such that their well-being increases. Based on research studies of satisfaction with public transport, measures at three levels of public transport services (use, access/egress, and overall) are identified and discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Public transport, Satisfaction with travel, Service quality, Well-being
National Category
Public Administration Studies Information Systems, Social aspects Economic Geography Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
Sociology; Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66943 (URN)10.1016/j.tbs.2018.03.004 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044112879 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-07-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7475-680X

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