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Karlsson, M. & Clerwall, C. (2018). Cornerstones in Journalism: According to citizens. Journalism Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cornerstones in Journalism: According to citizens
2018 (English)In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Journalism's appeal to the public is in decline and the causes and remedies for this are debated in society and academia. One dimension that has garnered attention is that of journalistic norms and how they are performed; it has been proposed that a journalism based on a different, more transparent, normative base can better connect with citizens, compared with the current prevailing norm of journalistic objectivity. However, the opinions of citizens themselves have been remarkably absent and, in order to inform the debate, this study inductively investigates how citizens view and relate to the notion of good journalism. Drawing upon a theoretical framework of Bourdieu's concept of doxa, journalistic role performance, and social contract theory, this study is based on the results of 13 focus groups. The findings suggest that the respondents’ views about good journalism are quite in accordance with the traditional norms of the journalistic field; however, there is more emphasis on stylistic and linguistic qualities. Few calls are made for transparency. The results suggest that a remedy to the decreasing trust in news may not lay in the changing of norms, but rather in how already established norms and values of the journalistic field are performed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Doxa, focus group, journalistic norms, journalistic role performance, news consumers, social contract theory, transparency
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69076 (URN)10.1080/1461670X.2018.1499436 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050552117 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Clerwall, C. & Nord, L. (2018). The public doesn’t miss the public. Views from the people: Why news by the people?. Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, 19(5), 577-594
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The public doesn’t miss the public. Views from the people: Why news by the people?
2018 (English)In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 577-594Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the main debates within journalism research during the last decade has been the role of citizens as contributors or, conversely, as threats to the practice of journalism. While participation has been explored from many different theoretical, empirical, and methodological perspectives, one perspective remains noticeably underexplored – the perspective of the citizens themselves. Using social contract theory as a backdrop, this study draws on a representative survey (N = 2091) and focus groups (N = 82) in Sweden. The results show that although citizens do not bring up participation as an important element of journalism, they become more skeptical the more participation affects journalism. Furthermore, they expect journalists to moderate citizen contributions according to established journalistic standards. From the perspective of social contract theory, participation in journalism appears to be more of a problem than a benefit to citizens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Gatekeeping, online journalism, participatory journalism, social contract theory, user-generated content
National Category
Media Studies Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) Human Aspects of ICT Social Work
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67402 (URN)10.1177/1464884917694399 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046721685 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-29 Created: 2018-05-29 Last updated: 2018-06-12Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M. & Clerwall, C. (2018). Transparency to the Rescue?: Evaluating citizens’ views on transparency tools in journalism. Journalism Studies (13), 1923-1933
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transparency to the Rescue?: Evaluating citizens’ views on transparency tools in journalism
2018 (English)In: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, no 13, p. 1923-1933Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transparency has emerged as an ethical principle in contemporary journalism and is contended to improve accountability and credibility by journalists and scholars alike. However, to date, few attempts have been made to record the public’s views on transparency. This study enriches current knowledge by using data from an experiment, survey and focus groups in Sweden collected between 2013 and 2015. Overall, the results suggest that the respondents are not particularly moved by transparency in any form; it does not produce much effect in the experiments and is not brought up in the focus groups. While that is the key finding of this study, it should also be noted that various forms of user participation are evaluated negatively, while providing hyperlinks, explaining news selection and framing, and correcting errors are viewed positively. Implications for journalism practice and research are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
credibility, experiment, focus groups, norms, survey, transparency
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69053 (URN)10.1080/1461670X.2018.1492882 (DOI)000443902400008 ()2-s2.0-85049809949 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-20Bibliographically approved
Örnebring, H., Lindell, J., Clerwall, C. & Karlsson, M. (2015). Autonomy from the inside: Journalists’ perceptions of workplace autonomy in five European countries. In: : . Paper presented at ICA 65th ICA Annual Conference Communication across the life span 21-25 May San Juan.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomy from the inside: Journalists’ perceptions of workplace autonomy in five European countries
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-40375 (URN)
Conference
ICA 65th ICA Annual Conference Communication across the life span 21-25 May San Juan
Available from: 2016-02-15 Created: 2016-02-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Clerwall, C. (2015). Datorn i journalistiken: och datorn som journalist (1ed.). In: Karlsson, Michael & Strömbäck, Jesper (Ed.), Handbok i journalistikforskning: (pp. 445-462). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Datorn i journalistiken: och datorn som journalist
2015 (Swedish)In: Handbok i journalistikforskning / [ed] Karlsson, Michael & Strömbäck, Jesper, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 445-462Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015 Edition: 1
Keywords
datajournalistik, robotjournalistik
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38019 (URN)9789144100777 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2015-12-29Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M. & Clerwall, C. (2015). Do not stand corrected: Transparency and users’ attitudes on inaccurate news and corrections in online journalism. In: : . Paper presented at Nordmedia15 : Media Presence – Mobile Modernities, 13 - 15 aug 2015. Copenhagen.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do not stand corrected: Transparency and users’ attitudes on inaccurate news and corrections in online journalism
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The accelerating news cycle means there is a risk that errors become more common but digital media also allows for correcting errors continuously and being transparent about this. In this study we investigate Swedish citizens’ attitudes towards errors and corrections. The results demonstrate that citizens have strong expectations that news media publish correct information and they have little tolerance for errors. People’s background and media use does not affect attitudes towards errors and corrections to any large extent but media trust explains a small fraction of the results – it is only those who already trust the media that appreciate corrections.

Keywords
accuracy, errors, corrections, immediacy, credibility, transparency
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38089 (URN)
Conference
Nordmedia15 : Media Presence – Mobile Modernities, 13 - 15 aug 2015. Copenhagen
Projects
Transparens och journalistisk trovärdighet
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 4396
Available from: 2015-10-01 Created: 2015-10-01 Last updated: 2016-07-06Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Clerwall, C. & Örnebring, H. (2015). Hyperlinking practices in Swedishonline news 2007–2013: the rise, fall,and stagnation of hyperlinking as ajournalistic tool. Information, Communication and Society, 18(7), 847-863
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperlinking practices in Swedishonline news 2007–2013: the rise, fall,and stagnation of hyperlinking as ajournalistic tool
2015 (English)In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 847-863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hyperlinks are considered vital to both the Web and to digital journalism. This study utilizes alongitudinal content analysis of hyperlinking practices in Swedish online news from 2007 to2013 to see how hyperlinking evolves over time. It also compares if and to what extentpublishing tradition shapes journalistic practice. The findings primarily show that the overallimpact of hyperlinks remains largely unchanged over time but that internal links, while stillbeing most common, decrease in relative importance while external links increase. Thegeneral conclusion is that hyperlinks, so far, are not an important aspect of onlinejournalism practice.

Keywords
hyperlinks, online journalism, digital news, publishing tradition
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-37946 (URN)10.1080/1369118X.2014.984743 (DOI)000351885000008 ()
Available from: 2015-09-15 Created: 2015-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Clerwall, C. & Nord, L. (2015). Please guard the gates: Users on user involvement in news. In: : . Paper presented at Future of journalism 2015 : Risks, Threats and Opportunities, Cardiff, 10-11/9 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Please guard the gates: Users on user involvement in news
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the main debates within journalism research the last decade has been the role of citizens as contributors or, conversely, threats to journalism practice. While participation has been explored from many different theoretical, empirical and methodological perspectives, one is eye-catching by its almost complete absence – the perspectives from the citizens themselves. The study situated in a Swedish context, draws from focus groups (N=82) and a representative survey (N=2091). The results show that citizens, firstly, do not bring forth participation as an important element of journalism and, secondly, expects journalists to moderate such contributions according to established journalistic standards. Consequently, the results suggest that the focus from previous research on various forms of participation in journalism is somewhat misguided as it has little appeal to citizens.

Keywords
Participatory journalism, user generated content, gatekeeping, online journalism, social contract
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38090 (URN)
Conference
Future of journalism 2015 : Risks, Threats and Opportunities, Cardiff, 10-11/9 2015
Projects
Transparens och journalistisk trovärdighet
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 4396
Available from: 2015-10-01 Created: 2015-10-01 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved
Clerwall, C. (2015). Robot journalism in Swedish newsrooms. In: : . Paper presented at NordMedia 2015 : Media Presence – Mobile Modernities, Köpenhamn, 13–15 augusti 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Robot journalism in Swedish newsrooms
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
robot journalism, journalism practice, robotjournalistik, journalistiskt arbete
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38025 (URN)
Conference
NordMedia 2015 : Media Presence – Mobile Modernities, Köpenhamn, 13–15 augusti 2015
Projects
News and opinion in a digital era (NODE), Karlstads universitet
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2016-07-04Bibliographically approved
Clerwall, C. (2014). Enter the Robot Journalist: Users' perceptions of automated content. Journalism Practice, 8(5), 519-531
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enter the Robot Journalist: Users' perceptions of automated content
2014 (English)In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 519-531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The advent of new technologies has always spurred questions about changes in journalism—its content, its means of production, and its consumption. A quite recent development in the realm of digital journalism is software-generated content, i.e. automatically produced content. This paper seeks to investigate how readers perceive software-generated content in relation to similar content written by a journalist. The study utilizes an experimental methodology where respondents were subjected to different news articles that were written either by a journalist or were software-generated. The respondents were then asked to answer questions about how they perceived the article—its overall quality, credibility, objectivity, etc. The paper presents the results from an initial small-scale study with findings suggesting that while the software-generated content is perceived as descriptive and boring, it is also considered to be objective although not necessarily discernible from content written by journalists. The paper discusses the results of the study and its implication for journalism practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-31596 (URN)10.1080/17512786.2014.883116 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-02-28 Created: 2014-02-28 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0101-9152

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