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Starrin, Bengt
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 348) Show all publications
Larm, P., Aslund, C., Starrin, B. & Nilson, K. W. (2016). How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 44(5), 525-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How are social capital and sense of coherence associated with hazardous alcohol use?: Findings from a large population-based Swedish sample of adults
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 525-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study examined whether social capital and a sense of coherence are associated with hazardous alcohol use in a large population-based Swedish sample. In particular, the objectives were (a) to examine which of five subdimensions of social capital is associated with hazardous alcohol use, (b) to investigate the moderating role of sense of coherence and (c) to examine possible sex differences. Methods: A postal survey was distributed to a sample of respondents (aged 18-84 years) from five Swedish counties that was stratified by sex, age and city; 40,674 (59.2%) participants responded, of which 45.5% were men and 54.5% were women with a mean +/- SD age of 53.8 +/- 17.9 years. Results: Structural dimensions of social capital were associated with an increased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women, whereas the increased probability associated with cognitive dimensions occurred mostly among women. Sense of coherence was robustly associated with a decreased probability of hazardous alcohol use among both men and women. There were few moderating effects of sense of coherence and sex differences emerged mainly for the cognitive dimension of social capital. Conclusions: Associations between social capital dimensions and hazardous alcohol use were partly sex-specific, whereas the benefits of a sense of coherence accrued to both sexes. Social capital dimensions and sense of coherence were generally unrelated to each other. Only associations between the cognitive dimensions of social capital and hazardous alcohol use differed by sex.

Keywords
Sweden, social capital, sense of coherence, hazardous alcohol use, sex differences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Work
Research subject
Public Health Science; Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-44554 (URN)10.1177/1403494816645221 (DOI)000377349500010 ()27113963 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-05 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Randell, E., Jerden, L., Öhman, A., Starrin, B. & Flacking, R. (2016). Tough, sensitive and sincere: How adolescent boys manage masculinities and emotions. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, 21(4), 486-498
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tough, sensitive and sincere: How adolescent boys manage masculinities and emotions
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, ISSN 0267-3843, E-ISSN 2164-4527, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to explore adolescent boys’ views of masculinity and emotion management and their potential effects on well-being. Interviews with 33 adolescent boys aged 16 - €“17 years in Sweden were analysed using grounded theory. We found two main categories of masculine conceptions in adolescent boys: gender-normative masculinity with emphasis on group-based values, and non-gender-normative masculinity based on personal values. Gender-normative masculinity comprised two seemingly opposite emotional masculinity orientations, one towards toughness and the other towards sensitivity, both of which were highly influenced by contextual and situational group norms and demands, despite their expressions contrasting each other. Non-gender-normative masculinity included an orientation towards sincerity emphasising the personal values of the boys; emotions were expressed more independently of peer group norms. Our findings suggest that different masculinities and the expression of emotions are strongly intertwined and that managing emotions is vital for well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Adolescence; boys; emotion management; grounded theory; masculinity; wellbeing; qualitative study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42321 (URN)10.1080/02673843.2015.1106414 (DOI)000407698200007 ()2-s2.0-84947910382 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2017-11-02Bibliographically approved
Rantakeisu, U., Rystedt, I. & Starrin, B. (2014). Economic and social insjustice and its relationships to psychological wellbeing, happiness and shame.. In: : . Paper presented at The 4th European Conference of Social Work Research, 15-17 April, Bolzano, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Economic and social insjustice and its relationships to psychological wellbeing, happiness and shame.
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34378 (URN)
Conference
The 4th European Conference of Social Work Research, 15-17 April, Bolzano, Italy
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2014-11-07Bibliographically approved
Alvinius, A., Kylin, C., Starrin, B. & Larsson, G. (2014). Emotional smoothness and confidence building: Boundary spanners in a civil-military collaboration context. International Journal of Work Organisation and Emotion, 6(3), 223-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional smoothness and confidence building: Boundary spanners in a civil-military collaboration context
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Work Organisation and Emotion, ISSN 1740-8938, E-ISSN 1740-8946, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 223-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
InderScience Publishers, 2014
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-26442 (URN)10.1504/IJWOE.2014.065757 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-02-21 Created: 2013-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, A. C., Starrin, B., Gigante, B., Leander, K., Hellenius, M.-L. & de Faire, U. (2014). Financial stress in late adulthood and diverse risks of incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in women and men. BMC Public Health, 14, Article ID 17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Financial stress in late adulthood and diverse risks of incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in women and men
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2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Financial stress may have adverse health effects. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether having a cash margin and living alone or cohabiting is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Methods: Representative population-based prospective cohort study of 60-year-old women (n = 2065) and men (n = 1939) in Stockholm County, Sweden. National registers were used to identify cases of incident CVD (n = 375) and all-cause mortality (n = 385). The presence of a cash margin was determined in the questionnaire with the following question: Would you, if an unexpected situation occurred, be able to raise 10 000 SEK within a week? (This was equivalent to US$ 1250 in 1998). Results: Compared with cohabiting women with a cash margin, the risk of all-cause mortality was higher among cohabiting women without a cash margin, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.97 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-3.66). Using cohabiting men with cash margin as referent, single men without a cash margin were at an increased risk of both incident CVD and all-cause mortality: HR 2.84 (95% CI 1.61-4.99) and 2.78 (95% CI 1.69-4.56), respectively. Single men with cash margins still had an increased risk of all-cause mortality when compared with cohabiting men with a cash margin: HR 1.67 (95% CI 1.22-2.28). Conclusions: Financial stress may increase the risks of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, especially among men. Furthermore these risks are likely to be greater in men living in single households and in women without cash margins. Living with a partner seems to protect men, but not women, from ill-health associated with financial stress due to the lack of a cash margin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
Cash margin, Financial stress, Cohort study, All-cause mortality, Cardiovascular disease
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41555 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-14-17 (DOI)000332708000001 ()24406139 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Flacking, R., Jerden, L., Bergstrom, E. & Starrin, B. (2014). 'In or Out'-On the Dynamic between Acceptance and Rejection and its Influence on Health in Adolescent Girls. Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, 22(3), 291-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'In or Out'-On the Dynamic between Acceptance and Rejection and its Influence on Health in Adolescent Girls
2014 (English)In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 291-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adolescent girls' subjective health, or well-being, is of international concern as the frequency of psychological and psychosomatic complaints is continuously increasing in several countries world-wide. The causes of this development are still obscure. The aim of this study was to explore well-being and strategies for increased well-being among adolescent girls. Grounded Theory method was used, in which in-depth interviews were held with 18 adolescent girls, 17-18 years of age. Results showed that striving for acceptance and avoiding rejection were central for their well-being. When rejection was experienced, emotions of stress-shame were recognized, a phenomena we call the stress-shame cycle. In the struggle to prevent rejection and to become accepted, the girls strived to boost their social attractiveness by impression management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications India, 2014
Keywords
girls, Grounded Theory, health, qualitative, shame, status, stress, teenagers, well-being
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41508 (URN)10.1177/1103308814534043 (DOI)000342825600005 ()
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Åslund, C., Starrin, B. & Nilsson, K. W. (2014). Psychosomatic symptoms and low psychological well-being in relation to employment status: The influence of social capital in a large cross-sectional study in Sweden. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosomatic symptoms and low psychological well-being in relation to employment status: The influence of social capital in a large cross-sectional study in Sweden
2014 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Unemployment is associated with adverse effects on health. Social capital has been suggested as a promoter of health via several causal pathways that are associated with the known health risk factors of being unemployed. This cross-sectional study investigated possible additive-and interaction effects of unemployment and five different measures of social capital in relation to psychosomatic symptoms and low psychological well-being. Methods: A random population sample of 20,538 individuals aged 18-85 years from five counties in Sweden completed a postal survey questionnaire including questions of employment status, psychosomatic symptoms, psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12) and social capital. Results: Psychosomatic symptoms and reduced psychological well-being were more frequent among unemployed individuals compared with individuals who were employed. Moreover, low social capital and unemployment had additive effects on ill-health. Unemployed individuals with low social capital-specifically with low tangible social support-had increased ill-health compared with unemployed individuals with high social capital. Moreover, to have low social capital within several different areas magnified the negative effects on health. However, no significant interaction effects were found suggesting no moderating effect of social capital in this regard. Conclusions: Elements of social capital, particularly social support, might be important health-protective factors among individuals who are unemployed.

Keywords
Employment, Public health, Self-rated health, Social capital, Unemployment
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41545 (URN)10.1186/1475-9276-13-22 (DOI)000332942300001 ()24593256 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Åslund, C., Larm, P., Starrin, B. & Nilsson, K. W. (2014). The buffering effect of tangible social support on financial stress: Influence on psychological well-being and psychosomatic symptoms in a large sample of the adult general population. International Journal for Equity in Health, 13, Article ID 85.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The buffering effect of tangible social support on financial stress: Influence on psychological well-being and psychosomatic symptoms in a large sample of the adult general population
2014 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 13, article id 85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Financial stress is an important source of distress and is related to poor mental and physical health outcomes. The present study investigated whether tangible social support could buffer the effect of financial stress on psychological and psychosomatic health. Methods: Two separate postal surveys were sent to random samples in five counties in Sweden in 2004 and 2008, with a total of 84 263 respondents. The questionnaires included questions about financial stress, tangible social support, psychosomatic symptoms, and psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12). Results: Individuals with high financial stress and low tangible social support had six to seven times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and many psychosomatic symptoms. By contrast, individuals with high financial stress and high tangible social support had only two to three times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and three to four times increased odds ratios for many psychosomatic symptoms, suggesting a buffering effect of tangible social support. Consistent with the buffering hypothesis, there were significant interactions between financial stress and social support, particularly in relation to low psychological well-being. Conclusions: Social support had its strongest effect at high levels of financial stress. The question whether the altering of our social networks may improve physical health is important for the prevention of ill health in people experiencing financial stress. Strengthening social networks may have the potential to influence health-care costs and improve quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: , 2014
Keywords
Buffering effect, Economic stress, Public health, Self-rated health, Social support, Psychological well-being
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-41500 (URN)10.1186/s12939-014-0085-3 (DOI)000345537100001 ()25260355 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ede, L. & Starrin, B. (2014). Unresolved conflicts and shaming processes: risk factors for long-term sick leave for mental-health reasons. Nordic Journal of Social Research, 5, 39-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unresolved conflicts and shaming processes: risk factors for long-term sick leave for mental-health reasons
2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Social Research, ISSN 1892-2783, E-ISSN 1892-2783, Vol. 5, p. 39-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mental illness is the most common diagnosis resulting in long-term sick leave in Sweden today, especially stress-related syndromes and mood disorders. The aim of this article is to analyse the relational and emotional processes in the workplace that may contribute to the understanding of long-term sick leave for mental-health reasons. We conducted interviews with twenty-six people who were on sick-leave because of diagnoses of mental ill-health. The empirical material was analysed using Classic Grounded Theory. We suggest that the risk of being afflicted with mental illness, and forced into long-term sick leave, increases when there are conflicts at work that remain unresolved and which lead to malignant shaming processes that jeopardize personal dignity. In their struggle to maintain self-esteem, the afflicted escalate their work efforts by increasing work intensity, putting in overtime, and working when ill. Eventually, this behaviour affects their health and results in sick-listing. The strengths and weaknesses of the study are discussed along with the need for further research.

Keywords
mental illness, long-term sick leave, shaming processes
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34373 (URN)
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Brandheim, S., Starrin, B. & Rantakeisu, U. (2013). BMI and psychological distress in 68, 000 Swedish adults: A weak association when controlling for an age-gender combination. BMC Public Health, 13, 68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BMI and psychological distress in 68, 000 Swedish adults: A weak association when controlling for an age-gender combination
2013 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, p. 68-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Study results concerning associations between body mass index (BMI) and psychological distress are conflicting. The purpose of this study was to describe the shape of the association between BMI and psychological distress in a large sample of Swedish adults.

 

Methods

Data was measured with the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), in 68,311 adults aged 18–74. Self-reported data was derived from a merger of the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Life and Health (Liv och Hälsa) questionnaires focusing general health and living conditions. Logistic regression analysis was used to describe the association between BMI and psychological distress when controlled for age and gender in combination.

 

Results

Women reported an overall higher psychological distress than men. A significant pattern of decreasing psychological distress with increasing age emerged among women in all BMI categories. Trends of this same pattern showed for men. Small or no differences were seen in psychological distress between those in normal weight, overweight, and obesity I categories (among women: 20.4 %, 18.4 %, 20.5 %; among men: 12.8 %, 11.2 %, 12.9 %). For both genders, any notable increase in psychological distress appeared first in the obesity II category (among women: 27.2 %. Among men: 17.8 %).

 

Conclusions

Our results raise questions concerning cultural norms regarding body norms. Does aging increase norm resistance while youth increases norm sensitivity, especially among women? The finding that psychological distress indifference between normal weight and overweight also included the obesity I category should be a point of departure in a search for important cut-off points in the BMI/ psychological distress association.

 

Results

Women reported an overall higher psychological distress than men. A significant pattern of decreasing psychological distress with increasing age emerged among women in all BMI categories. Trends of this same pattern showed for men. Small or no differences were seen in psychological distress between those in normal weight, overweight, and obesity I categories. For both genders, any notable increase in psychological distress appeared first in the obesity II category.

 

Conclusions

Our results raise questions concerning cultural norms regarding body norms. Does aging increase norm resistance while youth increases norm sensitivity, especially among women? The finding that psychological distress indifference between normal weight and overweight also included the obesity I category should be a point of departure in a search for important cut-off points in the BMI/ psychological distress association.

Keywords
BMI, Psychological distress, GHQ-12, Gender, Age
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-16009 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-13-68 (DOI)000314766500001 ()23347701 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-11-30 Created: 2012-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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