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Blomberg, A.-C., Lindwall, L. & Bisholt, B. (2019). Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study. Nursing Open
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operating theatre nurses' self-reported clinical competence in perioperative practice: A mixed method study
2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: During many years the operating theatre nurse's clinical competence has been describing in relation to patient safety, but the nursing care of the patient remains unclear. Therefore, we want in this study to investigate the relationship between background factors of operating theatre nurses self-rated clinical competence and describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence in perioperative nursing.Methods: A cross-sectional study with a mixed method approach was chosen. The instrument Professional Nurse Self-Assessment Scale of Clinical Core Competence was used for self-rating operating theatre nurses' clinical competence in perioperative nursing, and an open-ended question was added to describe factors of importance for development of clinical competence. In total, 1057 operating theatre nurses in Sweden were asked to participate, and 303 responded (28 %). They had different educational backgrounds and professional experiences, and were employed in universities or central/regional and district hospitals.Results: Academic degree, professional experience and place of employment were significant for the development of the operating theatre nurses' clinical competence. Academic degree appeared to affect operating theatre nurse leadership and cooperation, as well as how consultations took place with other professions about patient care. Being employed at a university hospital had a positive effect on professional development and critical thinking.Conclusions:  An academic degree influenced the operating theatre nurses' ability to act in complex situations, and along with professional experience strengthened the nurses' ability to use different problem-solving strategies and face the consequences of decisions made. Scientific knowledge and interprofessional learning and competence development in medical technologies should supplement nursing care for the development of clinical competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019
Keywords
mixed method, operating theatre nurse, perioperative nursing, clinical competence
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69842 (URN)10.1002/nop2.352 (DOI)000480822100001 ()
Note

Artikeln ingick som manuskript i Blombergs doktorsavhandling.

Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Bisholt, B. & Lindwall, L. (2019). Value conflicts in perioperative practice. Nursing Ethics, 26(7-8), 2213-2224, Article ID 969733018798169.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value conflicts in perioperative practice
2019 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 26, no 7-8, p. 2213-2224, article id 969733018798169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves.

OBJECTIVES:: This study describes operating theatre nurses' experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice.

RESEARCH DESIGN:: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATION:: The study followed ethical principles in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration and approval was granted by the local university ethics committee.

FINDINGS:: The result showed that value conflicts arose in perioperative practice when operating theatre nurses were prevented from being present in the perioperative nursing process, because of current habits in perioperative practice. The patient's care became uncaring when health professionals did not see and listen to each other and when collaboration in the surgical team was not available for the patient's best. This occurred when operating theatre nurses' competence was not taken seriously and was ignored in patient care.

CONCLUSION:: Value conflicts arose when operating theatre nurses experienced that continuity of patient care was lacking. They experienced compassion with the patient but still had the will and ability to be there and take responsibility for the patient. This led to feelings of despair, powerlessness and of having a bad conscience which could lead to dissatisfaction, and even resignations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Care ethics, perioperative practice, theatre nurses, value conflicts
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70021 (URN)10.1177/0969733018798169 (DOI)000486024000029 ()30345880 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A., Lindwall, L., Suserud, B.-O. & Rystedt, I. (2018). Ambulance Nurses' Competence and Perception of Competence in Prehospital Trauma Care. Emergency Medicine International, Article ID 5910342.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ambulance Nurses' Competence and Perception of Competence in Prehospital Trauma Care
2018 (English)In: Emergency Medicine International, ISSN 2090-2840, E-ISSN 2090-2859, article id 5910342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. We focus on trauma care conducted in the context of a simulated traumatic event. This is in this study defined as a four-meter fall onto a hard surface, resulting in severe injuries to extremities in the form of bilateral open femur fractures, an open tibia fracture, and a closed pelvic fracture, all fractures bleeding extensively. Methods. The simulated trauma care competence of 63 ambulance nurses in prehospital emergency care was quantitatively evaluated along with their perception of their sufficiency. Data was collected by means of simulated trauma care and a questionnaire. Results. Life-saving interventions were not consistently performed. Time to perform interventions could be considered long due to the life-threatening situation. In comparison, the ambulance nurses' perception of the sufficiency of their theoretical and practical knowledge and skills for trauma care scored high. In contrast, the perception of having sufficient ethical training for trauma care scored low. Discussion. This study suggests there is no guarantee that the ambulance nurses' perception of theoretical and practical knowledge and skill level corresponds with their performed knowledge and skill. The ambulance nurses rated themselves having sufficient theoretical and practical knowledge and skills while the score of trauma care can be considered quite low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2018
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-67358 (URN)10.1155/2018/5910342 (DOI)000431616600001 ()
Available from: 2018-05-24 Created: 2018-05-24 Last updated: 2019-08-14Bibliographically approved
Lindwall, L., Råholm, M.-B., Lohne, V., Caspari, S., Heggestad, A. K., Sæteren, B., . . . Nåden, D. (2018). Clinical application research through reflection, interpretation and new understanding: A hermeneutic design. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(3), 1157-1167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical application research through reflection, interpretation and new understanding: A hermeneutic design
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 1157-1167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The implementation of theoretical knowledge in clinical practice and the implementation of good clinical practice into theory have been of interest in caring science for the last 30 years. The aim of this article was to elaborate and discuss a methodology named clinical application research. The method is grounded in a hermeneutical design inspired by Gadamer's philosophy. The methodology, clinical application research, has been used in a research project A life in dignity and experiences from the researchers forms the bases for the elaboration and discussion. The project was performed in collaboration with residents, family caregivers and healthcare providers at six nursing homes in Scandinavia. The material for this article is based on the previous research, that is the results from 10 different articles showing the meaning of dignity and indignity in daily life in nursing homes. Data were generated from 56 individual interviews and 18 focus-group interviews with a total of 40 staff members with five to eight participants at every interview session. By reflection, interpretation and new understanding our results provide knowledge about dignity and how to preserve dignity for older people in an appropriate ethical way. The methodology was relevant for the research project A life in dignity and relevant to caring practice in nursing homes as it opens new possibilities and new ways of thinking when performing dignified care to older people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
Caring science, Clinical application research, Healthcare providers, Hermeneutics, Human dignity, Older persons, adult, article, caregiver, clinical article, controlled study, female, human, human experiment, interview, male, nursing home, philosophy, resident, Scandinavia, scientist, staff, thinking
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-66550 (URN)10.1111/scs.12561 (DOI)000445450800018 ()2-s2.0-85042200193 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A., Rystedt, I., Suserud, B.-O. & Lindwall, L. (2018). Learning High-Energy Trauma Care Through Simulation. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 17, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning High-Energy Trauma Care Through Simulation
2018 (English)In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 17, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation provides the opportunity to learn how to care for patients in complexsituations, such as when patients are exposed to high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle accidents.The aim of the study was to describe nurses’ perceptions of high-energy trauma care through simulationin prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative design. Interviews were conductedwith 20 nurses after performing a simulated training series. Data were analyzed using a phenomenographicmethod. The result indicates that simulation establishes, corrects, and confirms knowledge andskills related to trauma care in prehosp ital emergency settings. Trauma knowledge is readily availablein memory and can be quickly retrieved in a future trauma situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
simulation, learning, experience, phenomenography, method, ambulance, prehospital emergency care, trauma
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65548 (URN)10.1016/j.ecns.2017.11.009 (DOI)2-s2.0-85039151313 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, A.-C., Bisholt, B. & Lindwall, L. (2018). Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice. Nursing Open, 5(3), 414-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responsibility for patient care in perioperative practice
2018 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 414-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To obtain an understanding of operating theatre nurses' experiences of responsibility for patient care and safety in perioperative practice. Design: A hermeneutic design were used. Method: Data were collected during 2012 from 15 operating theatre nurses who participated in individual interviews. The text was analyzed by hermeneutical text interpretation. Findings: The texts revealed two main themes: A formal external responsibility and personal ethical value. Responsibility that the patient was not exposed to risks, protecting the patient's body, systematically planning and organizing work in the surgical team. The personal ethical value meant confirming the patient as a person, caring for the patient and preserving the patient's dignity. A new understanding emerged that the operating theatre nurse always have the patient in mind.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
ethic, hermeneutic text interpretation, operating theatre nurse, perioperative nursing, responsibility
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68748 (URN)10.1002/nop2.153 (DOI)000439858900022 ()30062035 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2019-07-09
Caspari, S., Raholm, M.-B., Saeteren, B., Rehnsfeldt, A., Lillesto, B., Lohne, V., . . . Naden, D. (2018). Tension between freedom and dependence: A challenge for residents who live in nursing homes. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(21-22), 4119-4127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tension between freedom and dependence: A challenge for residents who live in nursing homes
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4119-4127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives To present results from interviews of older people living in nursing homes, on how they experience freedom. Background We know that freedom is an existential human matter, and research shows that freedom remains important throughout life. Freedom is also important for older people, but further research is needed to determine how these people experience their freedom. The background for this article was a Scandinavian study that occurred in nursing homes; the purpose of the study was to gain knowledge about whether the residents felt that their dignity was maintained and respected. Design The design was hermeneutic, with qualitative research interviews. MethodTwenty-eight residents living in nursing homes in Denmark, Sweden and Norway were interviewed. Collecting tools used were an interview guide and also a tape recorder. Researchers in the three countries performed the interviews. The data were transcribed and analysed on three levels of hermeneutic interpretation. Results To have their freedom was emphasised as very important according to their experience of having their dignity taken care of. The following main themes emerged: (a) Autonomy or paternalism; (b) Inner and outer freedom; and (c) Dependence as an extra burden. ConclusionsResidents in a nursing home may experience the feeling of having lost their freedom. This conclusion has implications for healthcare professionals and researchers, as it is important for residents in nursing homes to feel that they still have their freedom. Relevance to clinical practiceIn clinical practice, it is important and valuable for the staff to consider how they can help older people feel that they still have their freedom.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70263 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14561 (DOI)000446561500029 ()29897638 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, M., From, I. & Lindwall, L. (2018). The significance of patient participation in nursing care: A concept analysis. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 33(1), 244-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The significance of patient participation in nursing care: A concept analysis
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to report on a concept analysis of the meaning of patients’ participation. Participation is commonplace in many areas of health care and has become an important issue in healthcare services. Participation is essential when giving nursing care. Challenges exist throughout clinical practice to make the patient a participant in their own care. The study had a caring science perspective. Method: A literature study based on Walker and Avant's method was used with eight steps. Data were collected using several databases covering the years 1995–2017. The analysis covered fifteen articles, dissertations, reports and textbooks. Findings: Patients’ participation may be defined as a concept that relates to and includes the three caring science concepts: learning, caring relationship and reciprocity (defining attributes). Conclusion: Participation is a concept with vague meaning that is prevalent in nursing practice. Patients’ participation is a complex concept. By using the attributes, it could be more visible in nursing care. The next question for research in this area is how these three attributes can best practically be achieved in a clinical context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2018
Keywords
caring science, concept analysis, consumer participation, healthcare practice, patients’ participation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-69453 (URN)10.1111/scs.12609 (DOI)000462154100025 ()
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Abelsson, A., Lindwall, L., Suserud, B.-O. & Rystedt, I. (2017). Effect of Repeated Simulation on the Quality of Trauma Care. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 13(12), 601-608
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Repeated Simulation on the Quality of Trauma Care
2017 (English)In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Simulation participants are not dependent on learning during an actual clinical situation. This allows for a learning environment that can be constructed to meet the knowledge and experience needs of the participant. Simulations in a prehospital emergency are an ideal way to address these needs without risking patient safety. Method: Nurses in prehospital emergency care (n = 63) participated in simulation interventions. During the simulation, the performed trauma care was assessed in two groups of participants with different frequency of simulation. Results: Several statistically significant differences and clinical improvements were found within and between the groups. Differences were noted in specific assessments, examinations, care actions, and time from assessment to action. Conclusion: The result suggested that repeated simulation may contribute to a clinical improvement in trauma care, and more frequent simulation may led to even greater improvements. (c) 2017 International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-65918 (URN)10.1016/j.ecns.2017.07.006 (DOI)000415717300002 ()
Note

Ingick som manuskript i avhandlingen med titeln Simulering som lärande inom prehospital akutsjukvård.

Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-04-17Bibliographically approved
Lohne, V. & Lindwall, L. (2017). Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring. Nursing Ethics, 24(7), 778-788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring
2017 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 778-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Dignity; fostering; healthcare personnel; nursing home; slow caring
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-42003 (URN)10.1177/0969733015627297 (DOI)000414712200002 ()26850071 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9363-5667

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