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Möller, Cecilia, PhDORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1918-6701
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Örnebring, H. & Möller, C. (2018). In the Margins of Journalism: Gender and livelihood among local (ex-) journalists in Sweden. Journalism Practice, 12(8), 1051-1060
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In the Margins of Journalism: Gender and livelihood among local (ex-) journalists in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1051-1060Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research on journalists and journalistic work has focused on journalists with permanent, full-time employment. Given the rapid decrease of such employment opportunities, we argue that journalism research needs to pay more attention to those who those who have had to leave their jobs and either stopped doing journalism entirely, or who have switched to a freelance career (sometimes combining journalism with other work). This category of people is at once becoming more marginalized and “the new normal” within the occupation: In this paper, we furthermore focus on local (Swedish) journalists and ex-journalists. Based on a set of semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with ex-journalists who share the experience of having lost their permanent, full-time jobs, we use the concept of livelihood as an analytical tool. The concept of livelihood highlights the shift from journalism as a job practiced exclusive of other jobs to an activity conducted alongside other income-generating activities and makes it possible to analyse leaving the occupation from a context that incorporates the whole life situation of the respondents. This also contributes to the current wave of studies of journalism and job loss by adding qualitative data about individual experiences of job loss to the existing quantitative survey evidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
journalism, livelihood, gender, Sweden
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68838 (URN)10.1080/17512786.2018.1497455 (DOI)000444275400012 ()
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
Möller, C. & Örnebring, H. (2018). Liquid geographies of journalism: gender, place and identity among ex-journalists. In: : . Paper presented at American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting in New Orleans. 10-14 april, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Liquid geographies of journalism: gender, place and identity among ex-journalists
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research on journalistic work has traditionally tended to privilege the workplace and newsroom as the main scene for journalistic practice, while reproducing male norms of work and professionalism and a clear work/life separation. Following staff cuts throughout the newspaper and media sectors across Europe and North America, there has been a sharp rise in scholarly interest in journalists’ not working, i.e. the experiences and effects of job loss and job insecurity among journalists.

We argue that due to increased precarity and blurred boundaries in/of journalistic work, livelihood is a suitable concept for analyzing both change and continuity within the gendered occupation of journalism. In this paper, we examine the liquid geographies of journalistic livelihoods by studying how (ex)journalists negotiate the tensions between occupational identities (privileging professionalism, mobility and career) and place based identities (mobilizing a sense of community belonging) in the experience of job loss.

The study is based on exploratory interviews with Swedish journalists who have left the occupation, either voluntarily or involuntarily. The paper analyzes their whole life situation, both their work lives and their private lives, when transitioning to a new profession. The study shows how both female and male (ex)journalists’ livelihood strategies are strongly rooted in the local community, revealing a wish to stay and work locally, choosing alternative work and improving their work-life balance - rather than striving to maintaining a journalistic identity. This contradicts earlier findings, which indicate that the professional identities of journalists are strong, even in the face of professional adversity.

National Category
Human Geography Media and Communications
Research subject
Human Geography; Media and Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68767 (URN)
Conference
American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting in New Orleans. 10-14 april, 2018.
Projects
Geomedia In-Between Spaces Research Programme
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Möller, C., Wang, J. & Nguyen, H. T. (2018). #strongerthanwinston: Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following tropical cyclones in Fiji. Tourism Management, 69, 272-284
Open this publication in new window or tab >>#strongerthanwinston: Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following tropical cyclones in Fiji
2018 (English)In: Tourism Management, ISSN 0261-5177, E-ISSN 1879-3193, Vol. 69, p. 272-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because the tourism industry can be affected by various natural disasters, the media landscape with increasing social media, brings to tourism new possibilities and challenges in its preparing for, and handling, such disasters. The literature has paid little attention to social media's part in such phenomena. Therefore, this study explores how social media are used by hotels following Tropical Cyclone Winston in Fiji using mixed methods, based on interviews (n = 12) and hotels' real time Facebook posts (n = 1288). While we find that social media were underused in preparing for the disaster and response that followed, it played a crucial role in raising funds and donations during the recovery phase. We apply the social mediated disaster resilience (SMDR) model to allow this study to fill the knowledge gap in organizational disaster resilience literature. We show how social media are integrated in resilience-building and its potential for increasing hotel resilience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
social media, tourism, cyclone, disaster, hotel, Fiji, organisational resilience, resources
National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Turismvetenskap; Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68763 (URN)10.1016/j.tourman.2018.05.014 (DOI)000441681400023 ()
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Möller, C., Alfredsson-Olsson, E., Ericsson, B. & Overvåg, K. (2018). The border as an engine for mobility and spatial integration: A study of commuting in a Swedish-Norwegian context. Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, 72(4), 217-233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The border as an engine for mobility and spatial integration: A study of commuting in a Swedish-Norwegian context
2018 (English)In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 217-233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to analyse how cross-border commuting differed from intranational commuting in Sweden, and how cross-border mobilities affected spatial integration. The authors analysed patterns and spatial flows of cross-border commuting by comparing them with characteristics of intranational commuting. In the article, they explore the assumption that the border constitutes an ‘engine’ for work-related mobility, which affects processes of spatial integration in cross-border areas. The empirical material comprised data from surveys of commuting from the Swedish county of Värmland to Norway and commuting within Värmland. The findings showed that cross-border commuting shared common features with intranational commuting, including how the frequency of commuting was dependent on distance. The motives for commuting differed, and the reasons for working in Norway were economic rather than professional. In terms of spatial integration, cross-border commuting was mainly one-directional, from Sweden to Norway, while leisure mobility and migration tended to be in the opposite direction. The authors conclude that the border region is characterised by integration through specialisation, which involves a permanent state of ‘transient’ mobility. Thus, a win-win situation can be distinguished, in which the border serves as a resource and an ‘engine’ for cross-border integration, mobility and economic activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
commuting, mobility, spatial integration, Swedish-Norwegian border region
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68766 (URN)10.1080/00291951.2018.1497698 (DOI)000441663000002 ()
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Möller, C. (2017). Communicating Disaster Spaces of the In-Between: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji. In: : . Paper presented at Geomedia 2017 International Conference: Spaces of the In-Between. Karlstad, 9-12 maj..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicating Disaster Spaces of the In-Between: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters. In tourism studies, few studies have explored the use of social media in disaster situations. This paper puts focus on the tourists’ roles and participation in disasters and crisis communication, based on a case study from Fiji, following tropical cyclone Winston in February 2016. The study explores the spatial and virtual dimensions of how disasters are handled, communicated and (de)constructed by tourists through social media as “spaces of the in-between”. In this context, tourists become not merely ‘victims’ by disaster events, but also powerful mediators in how the tourism destination is reshaped during a disaster, reflecting complex geographies of (im)mobility, (dis)connectedness, (un)control and inequalities. Thus, crucial questions include for what/whose purpose tourists use social media and if social media provides an arena for self-reflexivity among tourists about their own roles and impact as (potential) visitors to the disaster area in relation to other actors, including the local community. The paper has a qualitative netnographic approach, which involves studying social and cultural dimensions of online activities and how they relate and intersect with people’s everyday life. The netnographic fieldwork includes analysis of social media content (Tripadvisor and Facebook), interviews with Australian tourists who visited Fiji during and after the cyclone, as well as with hotels, resorts and tourism organisations in Fiji.   

National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Turismvetenskap; Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68768 (URN)
Conference
Geomedia 2017 International Conference: Spaces of the In-Between. Karlstad, 9-12 maj.
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Möller, C. (2017). Communicating Tourism Riskscapes: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji. In: : . Paper presented at The 7th Nordic Geographers Meeting. Geographies of inequalities. Stockholm, 18-21 juni, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communicating Tourism Riskscapes: Tourists’ use of social media during Cyclone Winston, Fiji
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters. In the field of tourism geography, few studies have explored the use of social media in disaster situations. This paper puts focus on the tourists’ roles and participation in disasters and crisis communication, based on a case study from Fiji, following tropical cyclone Winston in February 2016. The study explores spatial and virtual dimensions of how disasters are handled, communicated and (de)constructed by tourists through social media by using the concept ‘tourism riskscapes’. In this context, tourists become not merely ‘victims’ by disaster events, but also powerful mediators in how the tourism destination is reshaped during a disaster, reflecting complex geographies of (im)mobility, (dis)connectedness, (un)control and inequalities. Thus, crucial questions include for what/whose purpose tourists use social media and if social media provides an arena for self-reflexivity among tourists, bringing ethical issues of tourists’ roles and impacts into focus in relation to other actors, including the local community. The paper has a qualitative netnographic approach, which involves studying social and cultural dimensions of online activities and how they relate and intersect with people’s everyday life. The netnographic fieldwork includes analysis of social media content (Tripadvisor and Facebook), interviews with Australian tourists who visited Fiji during and after the cyclone, as well as with hotels, resorts and tourism organisations in Fiji.  

National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Turismvetenskap; Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68769 (URN)
Conference
The 7th Nordic Geographers Meeting. Geographies of inequalities. Stockholm, 18-21 juni, 2017.
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Möller, C., Wang, J. & Nguyen, H. T. (2017). Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following cyclone Winston in Fiji. In: : . Paper presented at 26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research. Falun, 4-6 oktober, 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tourism and crisis communication through Facebook following cyclone Winston in Fiji
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

During the last few years, several tourism destinations have faced different natural disasters, including cyclones, tsunamis and earthquakes. The transforming media landscape, including the use of social media and mobile technology, brings new possibilities and challenges of preparing and handling disasters for tourism stakeholders. On the one hand, the participatory nature of social media such as Twitter and Facebook may involve new and faster ways of sharing and responding to urgent crises, while triggering formal response efforts. On the other hand, the use of social media may also give rise to false information, lack of accountability and control of the information flows. This paper is based on the results of a case study of how Facebook was used for crisis communication by hotels and tourists following tropical cyclone Winston in Fiji in 2016. The aim of the study is to analyse the communication activity and digital engagement between stakeholders through social media during different phases of the crisis. The project is based on (1) Qualitative and quantitative Facebook data (posts, comments, likes etc.) from selected hotels in areas affected by the cyclone, based on location, size, operation and Facebook fans (2) An interview study with hotel managers in Fiji, conducted in June 2016.

National Category
Human Geography Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Turismvetenskap; Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-68770 (URN)
Conference
26th Nordic Symposium of Tourism and Hospitality Research. Falun, 4-6 oktober, 2017.
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Möller, C. & Eide, T. (2015). Culture of Learning. In: : . Paper presented at RSA-conference Global Growth Agendas: Regions, Institutions and Sustainability. Piacenze, Italy, May 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Culture of Learning
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-36880 (URN)
Conference
RSA-conference Global Growth Agendas: Regions, Institutions and Sustainability. Piacenze, Italy, May 2015.
Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Möller, C. & Olsson, E. (2015). Gender and cross-border commuting: the case of the Swedish-Norwegian border region. In: : . Paper presented at RSA-conference Global Growth Agendas: Regions, Institutions and Sustainability. Piacenza, Italy, May 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and cross-border commuting: the case of the Swedish-Norwegian border region
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Research subject
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-36879 (URN)
Conference
RSA-conference Global Growth Agendas: Regions, Institutions and Sustainability. Piacenza, Italy, May 2015.
Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Grip, L., Örnebring, H. & Möller, C. (2015). Journalism as Livelihood: gender, space and mobility. In: : . Paper presented at GeoMedia 2015 : Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, Karlstad, 5-8 May 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Journalism as Livelihood: gender, space and mobility
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite a large body of research on how journalistic work has changed in the past few decades, very little attention has been paid to what journalists do outside work (e.g. their lifestyles, personal networks, family situations, overall work and life situation), nor to how journalists negotiate their work lives and their private lives, despite the fact that such factors also may have an impact on the ability of journalists to fulfil some kind of public/democratic function. Such questions are arguably becoming more and more salient as journalistic work is becoming more mobile, more contingent, and more insecure.

In this paper we propose a multi-disciplinary approach to analyzing the interplay between journalistic work and lifestyles/life situation that combines intersectional feminist theories and methods in human geography with media studies through the concept of livelihood (rather than paid work, profession, occupation, etc.) at the center. We argue that this concept better captures aspects of mobility, place restraints, contingency and mutual interrelation between the public and private spheres in relation to journalistic work. The livelihood concept provides a tool for critically analyzing the gendered spaces and mobilities of journalism and the consequences for men’s and women’s daily life.

Keywords
Journalism, work, livelihood, gender, mobility, work-life balance
National Category
Media and Communications Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-38780 (URN)
Conference
GeoMedia 2015 : Spaces and Mobilities in Mediatized Worlds, Karlstad, 5-8 May 2015
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1918-6701

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