Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 157) Show all publications
Berglund, T., Gericke, N., Boeve-de Pauw, J., Olsson, D. & Chang, T. (2019). A cross-cultural comparative study of sustainability consciousness between students in Taiwan and Sweden. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 1-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-cultural comparative study of sustainability consciousness between students in Taiwan and Sweden
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Education for sustainable development (ESD) is promoted as one important component in the endeavor toward sustainable development. Goal 4 in the Sustainable Development Goals (UN in Sustainable development goals—17 goals to transform our world, 2017) in particular targets the role of ESD in this respect. The importance of cultural specificity in ESD is emphasized in numerous international policy documents, but there are few cross-cultural studies that focus on the broad context of sustainable development and ESD. The current study investigates the sustainability consciousness of grade 12 students (age 18–19) in Taiwan (N = 617) and Sweden (N = 583) and discusses the implications for ESD policy and practice. The findings indicate that significant differences exist between the two samples, both with respect to their sustainability consciousness and within the three sub-constructs of knowingness, attitudes and self-reported behaviors. The differences are considered in light of the cultural value orientations of the East Asian and Western European regions. Implications for ESD are discussed from the perspective of cultural specificity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Sustainable development, education, culture, sustainability consciousness, knowledge, attitudes, behavior
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Biology; Environmental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75228 (URN)10.1007/s10668-019-00478-2 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, B0589701
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-11-22Bibliographically approved
Olsson, D. & Gericke, N. (2019). Cross validation of a new scale covering student self-perceived action competence. In: : . Paper presented at Oral presentation within the symposium “Bringing Perspectives of Action Competence Together in Education for Sustainable Development”, held at the ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross validation of a new scale covering student self-perceived action competence
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This contribution aims to describe the development, cross validation and operationalization of a new scale developed to measure student self-perceived action competence. The underlying idea of education for sustainable development (ESD) is to empower young people to be sustainability action competent and thus, in the long run, contribute to transform the world into a more sustainable place (Lotz-Sitiska, Wals, Kronlid, & McGarry, 2015; Mogensen & Schnack, 2010, UNESCO, 2014). To be able to tune in and develop ESD processes and implementation strategies it is important to evaluate outcomes of ESD at the student level (Scott, 2013). Therefore, we set out to construct a reliable and valid instrument that covers action competence based on its definition in relation to sustainable development. The self-perceived action competence (SPAC) item battery was developed based on the definition of action competence by Danish researchers (Jensen & Schnack, 1997; Breiting & Mogensen, 1999). We built a higher order SEM model to validate the SPAC through confirmatory factor analysis. In our model, the student SPAC consists of three main parts (latent constructs): (KAP) knowledge of action possibilities, (COI) confidence in one’s own influence, and (WTA) a wish to act. The latent constructs KAP, COI and WTA are covered by four items respectively. 608 students aged 13-19 years old responded on a five-point Likert-scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree) to each of the twelve items. To cross validate the SPAC, the students also gave their answers to the short version (27 items) of the sustainability consciousness questionnaire (SCQs) (Gericke et al., 2018). The two scales were respectively validated with good model-fit. Moreover, the SPAC was translated into Dutch and cross validated with a group of Flemish students (n=403). The Flemish SPAC model was validated with good model fit. At the ECER conference in Hamburg, we will present the full 12-item scale and the full validation of the SPAC, including reliability measures of the scales and correlations between the Swedish and Flemish cohorts as well as the cross validation between the SPAC and SCQs for the Swedish data. We will invite the audience to share their thoughts on the relation between student self-perceived action competence and the action competence concept as an educational ideal. Feedback on strengths and shortcomings of our SPAC questionnaire will also be welcomed.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75277 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation within the symposium “Bringing Perspectives of Action Competence Together in Education for Sustainable Development”, held at the ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September.
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Per, S., Gericke, N. & Bladh, G. (2019). Different secondary school subject areas contributions to collaboration in environmental and sustainability teaching. In: : . Paper presented at Oral presentation at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different secondary school subject areas contributions to collaboration in environmental and sustainability teaching
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to the curricula in many countries, teachers in the subject areas of science, social science and language are expected to collaborate on cross-curricular issues such as sustainable development (SD). In Sweden this is the case in the nine-year compulsory school (Education, 2011). This study is based in Sweden and investigates the similarities and differences in the responses of ten teacher groups (forty-three teachers in total) to questions about their contributions in their own subject areas to environmental and sustainability education (ESE).

There are previously some barriers identified to the implementation of ESE in a cross-curricular way. In a large quantitative study including about 3300 Swedish upper secondary teachers, comparisons were made regarding teachers inclusion of ESE within different subject areas (Borg, Gericke, Höglund, & Bergman, 2012). In that study it was found that language teachers do not always feel at ease with ESE teaching, and more than 41% of language teachers stated that they did not include SD issues in their teaching, while 34% stated (the highest percentage of the three subject areas) that they lacked the necessary knowledge expertise. In contrast, especially the social science teachers and to somewhat less degree the science teachers included this perspective.

Regardless of the problems shown in previous studies the overall aim of this study is to understand what cross-curricular teaching in teacher teams can achieve in relation ESE. All teachers in compulsory school in Sweden are organized in cross-curricular teams of various subject teachers teaching the same student group, named lärarlag in Swedish and here denoted as teacher teams. Moreover, given that cross-curricular ESE teaching is stated as important in the Swedish curriculum, it is important to find out the potential possibilities for cross-curricular collaborations in ESE teaching. Are teachers already involved in collaborations, are they successful, and if so how? If not, how might they achieve this curricular aim to provide students with a holistic, yet diversified, perspective on ESE including many disciplinary dimensions? Teaching gaps for students may occur that no subject area can cover, while other issues or topics may be taught multiple times leading to poor progression.

The research question is: What are the specific curricular and pedagogical contributions of different subject areas, such as science, social science and language, in cross-curricular settings when teaching environmental and sustainability issues?

The theoretical framework of this study takes its departure from didactic analysis as an integrative model in which the structure of the subject matter is related to teachers and students through the processes of teaching and learning (Klafki, 1995). This study looks for differences and similarities in teachers’ argumentations about the didactical questions of what, how and why their subject area is important and how it contributes to cross-curricular ESE teaching. The main contribution of this study is to fill the gap in ESE research relating to teachers’ views of complex environmental and sustainability issues from different subject area perspectives.

Semi-structured group interviews were used to collect data about teachers’ apprehensions of and reflections on their teaching practices (Kvale & Brinkmann 2009). 10 groups (consisting of 3-10 teachers) of teachers of science (biology, chemistry and physics), social science (civics, history, geography and religion) and language (Swedish, English, German, French and Spanish) were interviewed. In this study the data is treated as a group voice from teachers teaching in a specific subject area. In order to identify a common teaching and curriculum approach in each subject area the teachers’ discussions and responses are analysed in relation to the main didactical questions of what, how and why. Phase 1 – What The aim was to gather data from the individual teachers in each group before the group discussion. This ensured that each teacher’s voice was heard individually. In group situations there is always a risk that some participants will dominate the discussion. Phase 2 – What The aim was to gather data from the teachers’ discussions without interference from the research leader. Phase 3 – How The aim was to gather data about curricular and pedagogical changes that had occurred in the teaching. Summary of the three phases – Why The teachers’ arguments about the long-term purposes of their teaching stem from the session on phases 1, 2 and 3 constitute the data for the why dimension. The common aspects and specific curricular contributions of the different subject areas are studied by analysis teachers’ responses to questions about the curricular and pedagogical qualities of what, how and why. What The analytical question posed to the data in interview phases 1 and 2 is: Which content and abilities relating to ESE are described by the teacher group? How – teaching aspects In interview phase 3, the teachers discuss how they conduct and change their teaching. This data is analysed using analytical questions relating to essential educational aspects of environmental and sustainability education (Sund, 2008; Sund & Wickman, 2011). Why – the object of responsibility In order to identify the teacher groups’ long-term purposes, all the data from interview phases 1, 2 and 3 are analysed using the analytical question (Sund & Wickman, 2008): What does this teacher group, in this specific subject area, really care about together when discussing their ESE teaching?

In order to answer the research question, the teachers’ responses are analysed using the didactical questions what, how and why. The results show that teacher collaborations in different subject areas can be fruitful in that they stress different yet complimentary aspects of ESE teaching. The potential important role of language teachers in ESE teaching is one of the main contributions of this study indicates a need for further research on how to improve language teachers’ confidence to voluntarily join and experience ESE collaborations. Science and social science teachers call for more time to plan and work together, whereas language teachers are often asked to collaborate by the school management (Sund, Gericke, & Bladh, Submitted). Each subject area has a specific ESE focus, and thereby is a possibility to contribute and complement each other through content, methods, dimensions and purposes, as in a true collaborative teaching. Such cross-curricular settings are able to offer students facts, opportunities to develop abilities through knowledge in action and support personal empowerment. In the process of cross-curricular ESE teaching, students’ individual identity-making is important. According to Celce-Murcia (1991), the process of self-realisation and relating to and communicating with other people are two common teaching approaches amongst language teachers. This can be an important part of making ESE knowledge powerful for learners in their everyday use and in contributing towards a more sustainable future. This could be language teachers’ main contribution to a cross-curricular collaborative work on ESE. The overall aim of ESE is to create action competent citizens (Jensen & Schnack, 1997). In subject area collaborations where many cross-curricular and societal transformations of knowledge are involved (Gericke, Hudson, Olin-Scheller, & Stolare, 2018).

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75281 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September.
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Olsson, D., Gericke, N. & Chang, T. (2019). Effects of green schools in Taiwan on students’ sustainability consciousness. In: : . Paper presented at Oral presentation at the 13th ESERA (European Science Education Research Association) conference in Bologna, Italy, 26-30th August..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of green schools in Taiwan on students’ sustainability consciousness
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75283 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation at the 13th ESERA (European Science Education Research Association) conference in Bologna, Italy, 26-30th August.
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-28Bibliographically approved
Bladh, G., Salmenkivi, E., Tani, S., Gericke, N., Juuti, K. & Per, S. (2019). Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE): a comparative study between disciplinary and thematic perspectives in the Finnish and Swedish curricula. In: : . Paper presented at NOFA 7 –Conference, Stockholm University. 13-15 May 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE): a comparative study between disciplinary and thematic perspectives in the Finnish and Swedish curricula
Show others...
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Pedagogical Work Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75251 (URN)
Conference
NOFA 7 –Conference, Stockholm University. 13-15 May 2019
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Per, S., Gericke, N. & Bladh, G. (2019). Environmental sustainability education - pedagogical and curriculum challenges in elementary & secondary schools. In: : . Paper presented at Roundtable presentation at CIES (Comparative and International Education Society) conference, 14th – 18th April, 2019, San Francisco, USA..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental sustainability education - pedagogical and curriculum challenges in elementary & secondary schools
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75285 (URN)
Conference
Roundtable presentation at CIES (Comparative and International Education Society) conference, 14th – 18th April, 2019, San Francisco, USA.
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Walan, S. & Gericke, N. (2019). Factors from informal learning contributing to the children's interest in STEM: experiences from the out-of-school activity called Children's University. Research in Science & Technological Education, 1-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors from informal learning contributing to the children's interest in STEM: experiences from the out-of-school activity called Children's University
2019 (English)In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have investigated effects of out-of-school STEM activities aimed at stimulating children's interest in science with positive results. However, research has not discussed the reasons why such activities are successful. Purpose: In this study, we address this gap by investigating which factors children themselves identified as interesting when they visited events at an out-of-school activity named The Children's University. Sample: Children aged 8-12 participated in the study. Altogether, there were 353 children involved in the data collection. Design and methods: A mixed method design was used, including a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews in which children's self-reported experiences were collected. Likert scale questions in the questionnaire were analysed based on descriptive statistics. The open-ended questions and data from the interviews were categorized by content analysis and analytically interpreted through 'the Ecological framework for understanding learning across places and pursuits'. Results: The children were positive about their visit, and these utterances could mainly be related to the development of the individuals' interest and knowledge according to the Ecological framework. We identified two new factors influencing student's interest in STEM in out-of-school activities: appreciating the spectacular and learning; verifying two factors of importance previously suggested in the literature: appreciating the content and the learning environment. Conclusions: The study highlights the specific factors the children actually appreciated from their visits to out-of-school activities, which could be of interest for stakeholders arranging different kinds of STEM events promoting informal learning. The content in the activities is important as well as spectacular features. To have the opportunity to learn something new in an environment that is conducive to learning is also of importance for children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Interest in STEM, content, spectacular, learning, informal learning environment
National Category
Natural Sciences Pedagogical Work
Research subject
Educational Work; Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75200 (URN)10.1080/02635143.2019.1667321 (DOI)000487549400001 ()
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Olsson, D., Gericke, N., Boeve-de Pauw, J., Berglund, T. & Chang, T. (2019). Green Schools in Taiwan: Effects on Student Sustainability Consciousness. Global Environmental Change, 54, 184-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Green Schools in Taiwan: Effects on Student Sustainability Consciousness
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 54, p. 184-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent decades, the Taiwanese government has worked actively to implement the concept of a sustainable Taiwan. As an important step in their strategy, the Ministry of Education has decided to promote the Green School Partnership Project in Taiwan (GPPT). However, academic research and critical reflection on the effects of this environmental and sustainability education initiative are lacking. Therefore, this study focuses on filling this gap by means of a nationwide generalizable effect study. The sampling allowed comparisons between the sixth, ninth, and twelfth grades in GPPT and non-GPPT schools and considered the geographic location (north, center, and south of Taiwan) as well as socio-economic area of the schools. A total of 1,741 students participated, answering a questionnaire that focused on student sustainability consciousness (SC) and its components (i.e., knowingness, attitudes, and behaviors in relation to sustainability). Data were analyzed through structural equation modeling. Our findings make an important empirical contribution, indicating that GPPT schools and non-GPPT schools have a similar effect on the SC of students, i.e. schools engaged in the GPPT do not enhance student SC. In addition, the gender gap regarding SC increased consistently with each increasing grade level, yielding higher mean values for the girls than for the boys. Furthermore, an adolescent dip occurred in the student SC, especially with regard to student sustainability behavior. Given these findings, implications for developing GPPT are discussed; this research could provide valuable informationabout the educational transformation process to enhance environmental and sustainability behavior among students in Taiwan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent dip, education for sustainable development, gender gap, green schools, sustainability consciousness
National Category
Other Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-70818 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2018.11.011 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2019-07-10Bibliographically approved
Thörne, K., Gericke, N. & Mc Ewen, B. (2019). Learning epigenetic mechanisms with analogies. In: : . Paper presented at ESERA, European Science Education Research Association 26-30 Aug Bologna Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning epigenetic mechanisms with analogies
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-74743 (URN)
Conference
ESERA, European Science Education Research Association 26-30 Aug Bologna Italy
Available from: 2019-09-13 Created: 2019-09-13 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Samuelsson, J., Gericke, N. & Olin-Scheller, C. (2019). Progressive education and grammar schools in Sweden: Mother tongue, History and Biology teaching in the 1940s. In: : . Paper presented at Oral presentation at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Progressive education and grammar schools in Sweden: Mother tongue, History and Biology teaching in the 1940s
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The first half of the 20th century saw the breakthrough of the idea of democratic education with an emphasis on accessibility of education for all citizens. Also John Dewey's ideas that the content and form of instruction should be based on democratic principles influenced many school systems. In Sweden, these ideas had an impact not least on the school reform initiated in Sweden during the 1940s, as manifested in the School Commission report (SOU 1948:27)

Research into this period has primarily focused on two educational levels. The first level deals to a large extent with policy and the character of curricula (Labaree, 2005; Popkewitz, 2006), while the second level concerns teaching in general with a special focus on how reform pedagogy has been implemented, for example, in studies of student influence and interaction (Cuban, 1993). In Sweden only the curricular level has been studied (Englund, 1996) leaving a knowledge gap regarding the reform pedagogics on the enacted curricula. In this study we fill this gap by investigating previously unexplored historical documents of teachers reports on their practice collected by the Swedish school commission from 1930s to the 1940s.  

In addition, in this study we also focus on how different subject teachers handled the expectations of student-centred teaching in their subjects. Admittedly, we are inspired by the approaches above, but apply a comparative subject-specific perspective on reform pedagogical teaching by using the perspective of didactic transposition (Chevallard, 2007).

The general approach of this study (and the project) is based on the education research tradition in which the voices and experiences of the members of the profession serve as a basis for generating new knowledge of specific professional issues (Schön, 1983; Lortie, 1992; Ball & Goodson, 1985)

The overarching aim of this paper is to study how secondary education teachers in mother tongue(MT), history (HI) and biology (BI) conducted their teaching inspired by reform pedagogy. The following questions guide our study:

What similarities and differences are there between the three subjects regarding

-          Students' opportunities to study on their own (StudentPart)

-          Student interaction (StundInter)

-          Using the surrounding community as a resource (SCPR)

A comparative perspective allows for more nuanced knowledge of the facets of reform pedagogy. It also adds to the field of history of education as it enables a better understanding of how different subject traditions influence how reforms are interpreted. The results presented here are part of a major project recently launched and are so far tentative. 

 The study particularly highlight the importance of professional practitioners’ own reflections on their work. Such reflections are assumed to generate new concepts and theories. Ball & Goodson, (1985), Goodson & Hargreaves (1996) and Ball et al (2012) are central regarding teachers’ work in general and the changes made in a reform context. They work on the assumption that teachers’ accounts and experiences contribute to understanding key aspects of the profession. This also applies to the historical development and current challenges.

In 1946, the School Commission started collecting teachers' experiences of teaching. The Swedish schools received a circular requesting teachers to submit their accounts, and this request was also made in teaching magazines. A total of 850 accounts written by teachers were submitted to the commission (SOU 1948:27). The material consists of written accounts by elementary school teachers and grammar school teachers. These reports are now stored in the The Swedish National Archives (RA). The texts are divided into all the school subject blocks. In a pilot study, we went through all the reports that all have a narrative or story character in which the teachers describe how they enact the reform pedagogy in the classrooms. The “stories” can be categorised as related to history (N=83 stories), mother tongue (N=130 stories) and biology (N=38 stories) in grammar schools. Altogether, there are over 251 stories available in these categories in the archive. Note that this number represents about 10 per cent of the entire teaching staff in 1946, i.e. making up a substantial representation of the teachers at that time. The stories mostly includes detailed accounts of the teaching practised and its relation to the pedagogical approach of the reform. Recurring elements are perspectives on the role of the pupil, the organisation of instruction etc. The stories cover between one page to 100 pages and often include lesson plans, and student responses. There are descriptions of their own teaching, often in a historical perspective. In this proposal, we present our first initial comparison of the teaching reported in the stories of history, mother tongue and biology reports. The comparative aspects are developed in a forthcoming in-depth analysis. The basis of a comparison is that the “cases” should be different but at the same time similar enough to be interesting to compare in terms of similarities and variations. Using more than one case (e.g. only history teachers) increases the chances to theorise and generalise. In this case the variable was the context of reform, as all teachers and subjects were under pressure to make changes in preparation of reform implementation. In identifying subject-specific teaching perspectives in relation to democratisation of instruction, the analytical frames from Cuban (1993) to describe reform pedagogy were used. In this particular study we analyse three specific criteria of reform pedagogy as defined by Cuban: student participation, student interaction and surrounding community as pedagogical resource.

Below, we present some general descriptive results based on the first quantitative analyses of the material, which focused on how teachers in different subjects relate to Cuban’s teaching criteria as mentioned in the method section. We present the results as frequencies as well as their relative distribution in per cent (%) of the three subjects of the three group of school subject reports of history, mother tongue and biology, see Table 1. If an instance of the specific criteria could be identified in a teacher story of their teaching it was included. Tabel 1 Distribution of reform pedagogical activities in the different school subjects. Frequency (per cent) StudPart Studinter SCPR Total HI 27 (33) 28 (34) 29 (35) 84 (34) MT 65 (50) 61 (47) 14 (11) 140 (36) BI 20 (53) 14 (37) 29 (76) 63 (55) T 112 (45) 103 (41) 72 (29) (Source Swedish National Archives) As can be seen in Table 1 the total results including all the three criteria of progressive teaching shows that the Biology teachers in average report far more reform pedagogic activities (55%) than Mother Tongue teachers (36%) and history teachers (34%). All in all, the first analysis shows that progressively oriented teaching occurred in upper secondary schools early in Sweden. It is also clear that there were variations between subjects. The differences should be understood as a result of various subject traditions that are enacted differently, which should be studied further by using qualitative in depth studies of the various didactic transpositions taking place in the different subjects. Further, studies will reveal whether these activities are an expression of a more close connection to the academic discipline, or a true influence of reform pedagogics

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-75280 (URN)
Conference
Oral presentation at ECER (European Conference on Educational Research) held by EERA (European Educational Research Association) in Hamburg, Germany 2-6th of September.
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8735-2102

Search in DiVA

Show all publications