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Petzäll, Kerstin
Publications (10 of 65) Show all publications
Tosterud, R., Petzäll, K., Wangensteen, S. & Hall-Lord, M.-L. (2015). Cross-Cultural Validation and Psycometric Testing of the Questionnaire: Debriefing Experience Scale. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11(1), 27-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-Cultural Validation and Psycometric Testing of the Questionnaire: Debriefing Experience Scale
2015 (English)In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, ISSN 1876-1399, E-ISSN 1876-1402, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the use of human patient simulation, there is a need for standardized and validated instruments across both national boundaries and cultural conditions. The aim of the present study was to translate and validate the Debriefing Experience Scale in a Norwegian context. The study was conducted as a survey of 146 bachelor’s nursing undergraduates. An expert group, conventional content analysis, the known-group technique and psychometric testing were all being used. The scale seemed to hold a good potential for evaluating debriefing, but would also benefit from reducing the subscales. Due to testing for validity being an ongoing process, there is a need for more studies to draw conclusions about the properties of questionnaire.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Nursing education, Human patient simulation, Debriefing, Debriefing Experience Scale, Psychometric testing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34603 (URN)10.1016/j.ecns.2014.09.011 (DOI)000369821000005 ()
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Tosterud, R., Hall-Lord, M.-L., Petzäll, K. & Hedelin, B. (2014). Debriefing in simulation conducted in small and large groups: Nursing students’ experiences. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 4(9), 173-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Debriefing in simulation conducted in small and large groups: Nursing students’ experiences
2014 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The debriefing phase in human patient simulation is considered to be crucial for learning. To ensure good learning conditions, the use of small groups is recommended, which poses a major challenge when the student count is high. The use of large groups may provide an alternative for typical lecture-style education and contribute to a more frequently and repeated training which is considered to be important for achieving simulation competency. The purpose of the present study was to describe nursing students’ experiences obtained during the debriefing conducted in small and large groups with the use of a qualitative descriptive approach. The informants had participated in a human patient simulation situation either in large or small groups. Data was collected through the use of five focus-group interviews and analysed by content analysis. The findings showed that independent of group-size the informants experienced the learning strategies to be unfamiliar and intrusive, and in the large groups to such an extent that learning was hampered. Debriefing was perceived as offering excellent opportunities for transferable learning, and activity, predictability and preparedness were deemed essential. Small groups provided the best learning conditions in that safety and security were ensured, but were perceived as providing limited challenges to accommodate professional requirements as a nurse. Simulation competency as a prerequisite for learning was shown not to be developed isolated in conjunction with simulation, but depends on a systematic effort to build a learning community in the programme in general. The faculty needs to support the students to be conscious and accustomed to learning as a heightened experience of learning out of their comfort zone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press, 2014
Keywords
human patient simulation, simulation competency, nursing students’ experiences
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34604 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v4n9p173 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved
Eklund, A. J., Wilde-Larsson, B., Petzäll, K. & Sandin-Bojö, A.-K. (2014). Individual and organisational factors influencing registered nurses' attitudes towards patient advocacy in Swedish community health care of elders. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 28(3), 486-495
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual and organisational factors influencing registered nurses' attitudes towards patient advocacy in Swedish community health care of elders
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 486-495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe and explore individual and organisational factors potentially influencing registered nurses' (RNs) attitudes towards patient advocacy. Methods and Sample: In a quantitative cross-sectional study, data were collected from 226 RNs in community health care of elders. A questionnaire was used to measure a number of factors including attitudes towards patient advocacy, nursing competence, personality traits, individual preferences regarding the quality of health care and working climate. A multiple regression analysis was performed. Results: The results showed that individual factors of nursing competence and individual preferences of the quality of health care, as well as organisational factors of the working climate, explained 26.2% of the variance in the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. Conclusions: Although the mentioned individual factors may be intertwined, the conclusion is that both individual and organisational factors influenced RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The results do not verify that nursing experience, workplace experience, educational level or personality traits influence the RNs' attitudes towards patient advocacy. The proportion of explained variance indicates that additional factors also influence attitudes towards patient advocacy, and more research is needed to shed further light on these factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
Keywords
community health care, geriatric nursing, nursing comptence, patient advocacy, quality of health care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-29345 (URN)10.1111/scs.12073 (DOI)000340288100008 ()
External cooperation:
Note

The article was published in manuscript form at the time of the thesis defense. It was then titled: Individual and organizational factors influencing nurses’ attitudes towards patient advocacy in community healthcare of older people.

Available from: 2013-10-09 Created: 2013-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Tosterud, R., Petzäll, K., Hedelin, B. & Hall-Lord, M.-L. (2014). Psychometric testing of the Norwegian version of the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, used in simulation. Nurse Education in Practice, 14(6), 704-708
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric testing of the Norwegian version of the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, used in simulation
2014 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 704-708Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation is increasingly being used as an approach to learning in nurse education. There is a need for frameworks and valid evaluation tools to help guide educators in implementing the method. The questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, which consists of two subscales, has been developed by the National League for Nursing in the US for evaluating simulation used in nurse education.

The aim of the present study was to test the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, for psychometric properties in a Norwegian nurse education context.

A sample consisting of 130 nursing students participated in a simulation situation, and 123 responded. When the questionnaire was tested in its entirety, psychometric testing conducted with a principal component analysis did not reveal a stable factor solution. The two subscales were then tested separately. The analysis for Satisfaction with Current Learning suggested a one-component solution, thereby explaining 62.8% of the variance, and the internal reliability was 0.84. With regard to Self-Confidence in Learning, no stable solution was achieved, and an alpha value of 0.64 was shown.

To further validate the questionnaire, Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning, more studies by various nursing programmes in different cultural contexts are recommended.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Exploratory factor analysis, Human patient simulation, Nursing students, Student satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34601 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2014.10.004 (DOI)000349568300020 ()25458231 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved
Eklund, A. J., Jossebo, M., Sandin-Bojö, A.-K., Wilde-Larsson, B. & Petzäll, K. (2014). Swedish nurses’ perceptions of influencers on patient advocacy – a phenomenographic study. Nursing Ethics, 21(6), 673-683
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish nurses’ perceptions of influencers on patient advocacy – a phenomenographic study
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2014 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 673-683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A limited number of studies have shown that patient advocacy can be influenced by both facilitators and barriers which can encourage and discourage nurses to act as patient advocates. Objective: This study’s aim was to describe Swedish nurses’ perceptions of influencers on patient advocacy.

Research design and context: Interviews with 18 registered nurses from different Swedish clinical contexts were analysed using the phenomenographic method.

Ethical considerations: Ethical revisions were made in accordance with national legislation and guidelines by committees for research ethics at Karlstad University. Findings: Three levels of hierarchically related influencers on patient advocacy were found in the descriptive categories. The fundamental influencer, the nurse’s character traits, was described in the perceptions that advocacy is influenced by nurse’s having a moral compass, having control over the care situation, being protective and feeling secure as a nurse. The second most vital influencer, the nurse’s bond with the patient, was expressed in the perceptions of knowing the patient and feeling empathy for the patient. The third level of influencers, the organisational conditions, was described in the perceptions that the organisational structures and organisational culture influence patient advocacy.

Discussion: The results correspond with findings from earlier research but add an understanding that influencers on patient advocacy exist at three hierarchically related levels. Conclusion: The nurse’s character traits are the fundamental influencer to patient advocacy, but in order to be comfortable and secure when advocating for patients, nurses also need to be familiar with both the patient and the situation. A supposition could be that all influencers interact, which needs to be further addressed in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Nurse–patient relationship, nursing qualities, organisation, patient advocacy, phenomenography
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-29346 (URN)10.1177/0969733013515488 (DOI)000341857900006 ()24477259 (PubMedID)
Note

Ingick i Anna Josse Eklunds avhandlingen som manuskript med titeln The three levels of influencers of patient advocacy. Swedish registered nurses’ perceptions of influencers to patient advocacy- a phenomenographic study.

Available from: 2013-10-09 Created: 2013-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Suserud, B. O., Jonsson, A., Johansson, A. & Petzäll, K. (2013). Caring for patients at high speed. Emergency Nurse, 21(7), 14-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring for patients at high speed
2013 (English)In: Emergency Nurse, ISSN 1354-5752, E-ISSN 2047-8984, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this article is to explore whether ambulance clinicians in Sweden perceive their working environment to be safe. Method: Twenty four ambulance nurses and nine paramedics at five ambulance stations in urban and rural areas of Sweden were interviewed. Findings: After transcripts of the interviews had been analysed, nine issues that affect how participants perceive the safety of patient care in ambulances emerged: planning before departure; use of safety belts; driving at high speeds; patient first, safety second; equipment design and placement; noise; driving styles; presence of relatives; documentation. Conclusion: Ambulance personnel should have greater involvement in the design of ambulance care spaces and drivers should be given more regular training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
RCNI, 2013
Keywords
Ambulance design; Driving skills; Patients and practitioner safety; Pre-hospital care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-43857 (URN)2-s2.0-84888630654 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-06-30 Created: 2016-06-30 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Tosterud, R., Hall-Lord, M.-L., Wangensteen, S. & Petzäll, K. (2013). Nursing students' perceptions of debriefing in simulation-based learning dependent on having participated in small or large groups. In: : . Paper presented at SESAM, June 12-15, PARIS.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' perceptions of debriefing in simulation-based learning dependent on having participated in small or large groups
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-28673 (URN)
Conference
SESAM, June 12-15, PARIS
Available from: 2013-08-20 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved
Eklund, A. J., Petzäll, K., Sandin-Bojö, A.-K. & Wilde-Larsson, B. (2013). Swedish registered nurses’ and nurse managers’ attitudes towards patient advocacy in community care of older patients. Journal of Nursing Management, 21(5), 753-761
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish registered nurses’ and nurse managers’ attitudes towards patient advocacy in community care of older patients
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 753-761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To describe and compare registered nurses’ (RNs) and nurse managers’ (NMs) attitudes towards patient advocacy in the community care of older patients.

Background RNs may act as patients’ advocates in the care of older patients. NMs should support patient advocacy in order to make the best care available to patients.

Method A modified Attitudes towards Patient Advocacy Scale was used to collect data from 207 RNs and 23 NMs in the Swedish community care of older patients. The response rate was 52%. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used.

Results Both RNs and NMs showed positive attitudes towards patient advocacy. They were more positive towards patient advocacy for patients unable to help themselves than for competent patients.

Conclusions This study showed that RNs and NMs did not differ in their attitudes towards patient advocacy. This result is consistent with the idea of giving the neediest and vulnerable patients greater care.

Implications for Nursing Management It is important for NMs to clarify their own and RNs attitudes towards patient advocacy as disparities may affect cooperation between the groups. Any effects on cooperation may, by extension, affect the quality of care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
community care, nurse managers, older patients, patient advocacy
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-15281 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2834.2012.01453.x (DOI)000321981800006 ()23409794 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-10-23 Created: 2012-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Willman, A., Petzäll, K., Östberg, A.-L. & Hall-Lord, M. L. (2013). The psycho-social dimension of pain and health-related quality of life in the oldest old. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 27(3), 534-540
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The psycho-social dimension of pain and health-related quality of life in the oldest old
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 534-540Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The psycho-social dimension of pain and health-related quality of life in the oldest old Background:  Chronic pain has an impact on the physical and social functioning of older people which in turn may worsen their health-related quality of life. Research with focus on prolonged extensive pain in the most elderly and how pain may interfere with their life situation is scarce. Aims:  The aims were to describe and investigate pain from a multidimensional point of view (duration, location, psycho-social) and health-related quality of life as well as to compare sex and age groups in people aged 80 years and over. Methods:  In this cross-sectional study, a total of 225 of 282 people responded to a questionnaire consisting of two instruments and background questions. The psycho-social dimension of pain was measured using the Multidimensional Pain Inventory-Swedish language version (MPI-S) with five scales: Pain Severity, Interference, Life Control, Affective Distress and Social Support. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Short Form Health Survey-12 (SF-12). Results:  Median duration of pain was 9.0 years, and the mean number of pain locations was 2.04. The MPI-S scale Interference with a negative orientation had the highest mean score, while the mean score for Social Support was the highest for the scales with a positive orientation. The duration of pain was significantly greater for women, and those aged 80-85 years had higher pain severity than those aged >86. Participants with a lower health-related quality of life experienced significantly more severe pain, were more troubled with pain and had less control of their life. Conclusions:  Older people with prolonged pain suffered from a low health-related quality of life. Pain interfered with their lives and contributed to diminished control in their daily lives. Nurses are essential for the identification and prevention of pain and should be aware of how pain affects older people's physical, mental and social health.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-14572 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01062.x (DOI)000321625800006 ()22862547 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-08-27 Created: 2012-08-27 Last updated: 2017-08-15Bibliographically approved
Eklund, A. J., Petzäll, K., Sandin-Bojö, A.-K. & Wilde-Larsson, B. (2012). Cross-cultural validation and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the microsocial section of the Attitudes toward Patient Advocacy Scale. The International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, 2(3), 473-481
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-cultural validation and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the microsocial section of the Attitudes toward Patient Advocacy Scale
2012 (English)In: The International Journal of Person Centered Medicine, ISSN 2043-7730, E-ISSN 2043-7749, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 473-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rationale, aims and objectives: Patient advocacy can be defined as a process for maintaining and monitoring patients’ rights, values and best interests. To measure attitudes toward patient advocacy, Bu and Wu (2008) developed the Attitudes toward Patient Advocacy Scale (APAS), which required further testing and refining in different contexts. This two-phased study aimed to: (1) translate and cross-culturally validate the APAS section for microsocial patient advocacy (AMIA) in accordance with the Swedish context and (2) test the instrument’s psychometric properties in the community care of older patients.

Methods and results: The first phase consisted of back-translation and cultural validation of the APAS-AMIA in accordance with the Swedish context and resulted in a 39-item Swedish version of the APAS-AMIA. In the second phase, data were collected using the 39-item APAS-AMIA in 2009 from a sample of 230 registered nurses and nurse managers covering 16 communities. Subsequently, psychometric testing was conducted with exploratory factor analysis and reliability analysis in a final sample of 201 RNs. The exploratory factor analysis revealed a 4-factor structure, explaining 52.1% of the total scale variance in a 33-item instrument called the APAS-AMIA/SE. The Cronbach’s alpha for the APAS-AMIA/SE was 0.92 and varied between 0.82 and 0.88 for the factors.

Conclusion: When the APAS-AMIA/SE semantic and conceptual equivalence to the APAS-AMIA, its distinct factor structure, internal consistency values and theoretical attachment are all added together, the conclusion is that the APAS-AMIA/SE is an acceptably reliable and valid instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Open Journal Systems, 2012
Keywords
Community care, exploratory factor analysis, nursing, older patients, patient advocacy, person-centered medicine, psychometric testing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-15276 (URN)10.5750/ijpcm.v2i3.269 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-10-23 Created: 2012-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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